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Static asserts are very convenient for checking things in compile time. A simple static assert idiom looks like this:

template<bool> struct StaticAssert;
template<> struct StaticAssert<true> {};

#define STATIC_ASSERT(condition) do { StaticAssert<(condition)>(); } while(0)

This is good for stuff like

STATIC_ASSERT(sizeof(float) == 4)

and:

#define THIS_LIMIT (1000)
...
STATIC_ASSERT(THIS_LIMIT > OTHER_LIMIT);

But using #define is not the "C++" way of defining constants. C++ would have you use an anonymous namespace:

namespace {
    const int THIS_LIMIT = 1000;
}

or even:

static const int THIS_LIMIT = 1000;

The trouble with this is that with a const int you can't use STATIC_ASSERT() and you must resort to a run-time check which is silly.

Is there a way to properly solve this in current C++?
I think I've read C++0x has some facility to do this...


EDIT

Ok so this

static const int THIS_LIMIT = 1000;
...
STATIC_ASSERT(THIS_LIMIT > 0);

compiles fine
But this:

static const float THIS_LIMIT = 1000.0f;
...
STATIC_ASSERT(THIS_LIMIT > 0.0f);

does not.
(in Visual Studio 2008)

How come?

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Why are you using NIH static assert, instead of BOOST_STATIC_ASSERT? boost.org/doc/libs/1_43_0/doc/html/boost_staticassert.html –  Pavel Radzivilovsky May 25 '10 at 7:58
    
I can't use boost (yet) for some silly corporate reason –  shoosh May 25 '10 at 8:03
1  
What makes you think you can't use integral constants in this case? The above should work just fine. –  Georg Fritzsche May 25 '10 at 8:06
    
Floating-point values have a few static restrictions over integral ones. Note, for example, that you cannot pass them as template arguments. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 21 '12 at 22:03
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6 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Why, you can still static assert with const int:

#define static_assert(e) extern char (*ct_assert(void)) [sizeof(char[1 - 2*!(e)])]
static_assert( THIS_LIMIT > OTHER_LIMIT )

Also, use boost!

BOOST_STATIC_ASSERT( THIS_LIMIT > OTHER_LIMIT )

... you'll get a lot nicer error messages...

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Well, there's a lesson for me. don't say something isn't possible before trying it... –  shoosh May 25 '10 at 8:11
    
I still wonder what problem that is supposed to fix? –  Georg Fritzsche May 25 '10 at 8:13
    
@shoosh: You original code should compile fine. See my reply. –  sbi May 25 '10 at 8:16
    
@Georg, I just posted the one I use in lack of boost -- it's advantage is that it doesn't have to be in function scope. As for error readability -- depends on the compiler. –  Kornel Kisielewicz May 25 '10 at 8:59
1  
@sbi: Ah, no problem. @Kornel: Maybe its only me, but i read it as "use this instead, otherwise it won't work", you don't mention that the OPs original approach already worked. –  Georg Fritzsche May 25 '10 at 9:05
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static_assert is a compiler feature in C++0x so as long as you've got a relatively up-to-date compiler you can use that. Watch out for doing #define static_assert(x) ..., because it's a real keyword in C++0x so you'd be permanently hiding the compiler feature. Also, C++0x static_assert takes two parameters (eg. static_assert(sizeof(int) == 4, "Expecting int to be 4 bytes")), so you could cause yourself problems trying to switch in future if you use that #define.

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Perhaps you're confusing C++'s behavior with C, where const int does not represent a true compile-time constant. Or perhaps your C++ compiler is broken. If it's truly the latter, use enum instead.

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you got +1, i got -1 for the same solution =/ –  Viktor Sehr Sep 9 '10 at 8:27
    
@Viktor Sehr: To be fair, my answer provides mores explanation than yours, and using enum should not be necessary in C++ for this case. –  jamesdlin Sep 9 '10 at 9:05
    
@ViktorSehr: This place is not about chucking out "solutions" in snippets of code like they were pieces of meat; it's about writing answers to explain, teach and inform. Often, good answers include code illustrations, but that does not mean that an answer which consists solely of code is a good one. Indeed, it's rare that that's the case. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 21 '12 at 22:06
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This:

namespace {
    const int THIS_LIMIT = 1000;
}

template<bool> struct StaticAssert;
template<> struct StaticAssert<true> {};

#define STATIC_ASSERT(condition) do { StaticAssert<(condition)>(); } while(0)

int main()
{
    STATIC_ASSERT(THIS_LIMIT > 5);

    return (0);
}

compiles fine with VC and Comeau.

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It seems that you're really asking why the following is the case (and I can confirm that in both GCC 4.3.4 and Visual C++ 2008 Express):

template<bool> struct StaticAssert;
template<> struct StaticAssert<true> {};

#define STATIC_ASSERT(condition) do { StaticAssert<(condition)>(); } while(0)


static const int   AN_INT  = 1000;
static const float A_FLOAT = 1000.0f;

int main()
{
   STATIC_ASSERT(AN_INT > 0);     // OK
   STATIC_ASSERT(A_FLOAT > 0.0f); // Error: A_FLOAT may not appear in a constant expression
}

There are number of restrictions on using floating-point values statically. Note, for example, that you cannot pass them as template arguments. That is because:

[C++11: 5.19/2]: A conditional-expression is a core constant expression unless it involves one of the following as a potentially evaluated subexpression (3.2), but subexpressions of logical AND (5.14), logical OR (5.15), and conditional (5.16) operations that are not evaluated are not considered [ Note: An overloaded operator invokes a function. —end note ]:

  • [..]
  • an lvalue-to-rvalue conversion (4.1) unless it is applied to
    • a glvalue of integral or enumeration type that refers to a non-volatile const object with a preceding initialization, initialized with a constant expression, or
    • a glvalue of literal type that refers to a non-volatile object defined with constexpr, or that refers to a sub-object of such an object, or
    • a glvalue of literal type that refers to a non-volatile temporary object whose lifetime has not ended, initialized with a constant expression;
  • [..]

(i.e. only integral and enumeration types are allowed; no floating-point types.)

As for the reason for this rule, I'm not entirely sure, but the following sort of rationale may well have something to do with it:

[C++11: 5.19/4]: [..] Since this International Standard imposes no restrictions on the accuracy of floating-point operations, it is unspecified whether the evaluation of a floating-point expression during translation yields the same result as the evaluation of the same expression (or the same operations on the same values) during program execution. [..]

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enum{THIS_LIMIT = 1000};

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Why the -1 vote? –  Viktor Sehr Jun 17 '10 at 14:24
    
I didn't downvote you, but this is hardly an answer to the given question. It's a valid workaround, and it's valid code, but you provided zero description, zero explanation and zero analysis of (a) what it does, (b) how it differs from the OP's code and (c) why it should be used (and, in fact, it doesn't need to be). Consequently it comes across as a little lazy, and that's probably why it was downvoted. In fact, come to think of it, I'm going to downvote it too for that reason. Sorry. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 21 '12 at 22:05
    
Dont worry, I think you provided quite a good explanation :) –  Viktor Sehr May 16 '13 at 8:09
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