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How to create a file in Windows that would have attributes FILE_ATTRIBUTE_TEMPORARY and FILE_FLAG_DELETE_ON_CLOSE set using Java?

I do want my file to be just in-memory file.

To precise: delete-on-exit mechanism does not satisfy me, because I want to avoid situation, when some data is left on disk in case of, for example, application crash.

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5 Answers 5

Use something like this. It won't be in-memory though, but a temporary file that is deleted when the app exits.

try { 
   // Create temp file. 
   File temp = File.createTempFile("pattern", ".suffix"); 

   // Delete temp file when program exits.
   temp.deleteOnExit();

   // Write to temp file
   BufferedWriter out = new BufferedWriter(new FileWriter(temp));    
   out.write("aString");     
   out.close();
} catch (IOException e) { 
// (..)
} 
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Well, I want to pass some data to external Windows (not Java) application using the file. Reading from a file is an only option for that application. And I want to avoid situation, when some data leaves on disk in case, for example, application crash. That's why I think, the temporary Windows file would be the best solution. Delete-on-exit mechanism may leave data on disk in some cases, I think. –  Przemysław Różycki May 25 '10 at 10:48
    
@Przemysław, if the app crashes, you don't have control on what can be executed. What about doing a temp file clean up right after the app starts up? –  b.roth May 25 '10 at 10:53
    
FILE_ATTRIBUTE_TEMPORARY + FILE_FLAG_DELETE_ON_CLOSE has a chance of leaving a file on disk too. If you use deleteOnExit as well, you reduce the chance because the system memory would have to be under pressure and then the application crash as well. tmpfs only offers a slightly better option, the file would remain available after an application crash until the next reboot. –  mjaggard Nov 25 '13 at 14:54

Why not just use a memory block i.e. datastructure ? What's the incentive behind creating a file ? If you want a scratch file then temp file and delete on exit will help.

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Well, I want to pass some data to external Windows (not Java) application using the file. Reading from a file is an only option for that application. And I want to avoid situation, when some data leaves on disk in case, for example, application crash. That's why I think, the temporary Windows file would be the best solution. Delete-on-exit mechanism may leave data on disk in some cases, I think. –  Przemysław Różycki May 25 '10 at 10:48
    
@PrzemysławRóżycki - the problem is that the contents of files (including temporary ones) are typically still on disc after the file has been deleted! You've heard of "Norton Utilities"? –  Stephen C Nov 26 '13 at 13:44

Even with both the flags set your files might end up in the filesystem. If the system cache becomes too small, the file is written to the disk, and if the system crashes, no afterprocess cleanup is performed.

However, I like your idea and wonder why the JVM implementation on Windows doesn't use the flags by default. At least deleteOnExit() should be implemented like this as a fallback.

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I do want my file to be just in-memory file.

Marking a file as temporary and delete-on-close on Windows won't guarantee that it is not written to the file system.

With UNIX / Linux you could create the file in TmpFS or RamFS file system; i.e. a file system that stores files in RAM memory. TmpFS is backed by virtual memory, so some or all of a file in RamFS may end up on the swap disc. RamFS is not backed by virtual memory, and should only ever reside in RAM.

An overview of RamFS and TmpFS can be found here.

Note however that it is possible (at least in theory) for RamFS contents to end up on disc.

  • If the system is put into hibernate state, the entire contents of RAM is saved to disc before the system is powered down.

  • If the kernel can be induced to crash and kernel crash dumps are enabled, the contents of kernel memory (probably including the RamFS) will be written to the dump.

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It seems to me that both Windows and non-Windows supply a system of temporary files where they are written to disk iff the system is low on memory. This functionality should be accessible to Java programmers via a standard API. –  mjaggard Nov 25 '13 at 14:51
    
You are talking about paging / virtual memory I think. 1) They are not temporary files. 2) Data is not only written to the paging area when space is low. 3) There is no such standard API in Java ... or in any other language ... that allows application programs to treat paging space as a file system. 4) I don't see how such a (hypothetical) API would help the OP. –  Stephen C Nov 25 '13 at 16:06
    
No, I am talking about temporary files. By which I mean tmpfs on non-Windows operating systems and FILE_ATTRIBUTE_TEMPORARY+FILE_FLAG_DELETE_ON_CLOSE on Windows. Both allow files to be written into memory and only written to disk when memory pressure dictates. There is no standard API in Java - that is correct but there ARE APIs in C++ for this. It helps the OP because it's EXACTLY what he was asking for. blogs.msdn.com/b/larryosterman/archive/2004/04/19/116084.aspx –  mjaggard Nov 26 '13 at 11:34
    
Well in that case, 1) your comment about "a system of temporary files that are written to disk iff system memory is low" is incorrect for non-Windows operating systems. 2) Linux / UNIX systems typically support memory file systems, but they don't have precisely the properties you claim. 3) AFAIK Java provides no I/O APIs that are aware of this special property ... when the OS supports it. 4) This doesn't address the OP's requirements anyway. He wants "files" that are NEVER written to disk. –  Stephen C Nov 26 '13 at 13:40
    
He said "How to create a file in Windows that would have attributes FILE_ATTRIBUTE_TEMPORARY and FILE_FLAG_DELETE_ON_CLOSE set using Java?" I know those APIs don't exist in Java at present, I just think that they should do. I don't think I'm wrong about writing the files to disk iff there's not much memory - it's just that on Windows it's an accessible file and on tmpfs it's in the swap space. –  mjaggard Nov 26 '13 at 16:08

You are after a windows specific solution, so why not create files using wndows commands execed via Processbuilder.

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Whilst this is true from the question, the solution to this could be generic because tmpfs does exactly the same job in Linux. –  mjaggard Nov 25 '13 at 14:49

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