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How to detect ctrl+v ,Ctrl+c using Javascript?

i need to restrict pasting in my textareas,end user should not copy and paste the content, user should only type text in text area. how to achive this.

Thanks in advance.

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2  
What is the purpose of this? The only two legitimate scenarios I can think of are password fields (which you can't copy out of anyway) and a typing speed test. I'm sure you can detect suspiciously fast typing. –  Paul Butcher May 25 '10 at 11:15
4  
@Paul Butcher, @Propeng: There are scenarios, where you need this. Very simple example: A site for learning foreign languages. The learning effect is enhanced, if you type the words by hand instead of using copy & paste. –  back2dos May 25 '10 at 13:55
1  
Good point, but in a learning situation, this restriction needn't be enforced, because the user will want to type it in. It is only when testing, that you should ensure that the answers they are giving are actually entered by them, and even then, if they have access to an answer to copy & paste, they can equally well copy it in manually, so it doesn't help. –  Paul Butcher May 25 '10 at 15:01
1  
Another legitimate situation might be where double entry is required to detect mistakes (e.g. type your email in twice, so that we know it hasn't got a typo in it). Still, such a user might keep a list of randomly generated email addresses (e.g. sneakemail), and would probably want to paste it for accuracy. –  Paul Butcher May 25 '10 at 15:08
10  
@Paul Butcher - that is not a legitimate situation at all, I hate sites that do that and I always copy/paste my (long) email address from one input to the other. Breaking copy/paste is a major usability problem. It really throws the user off, because it's so fundamental to their mental model that they expect it to "just work". It's as if you tried to pull a door and it swung away from you instead of towards you! –  EMP Jun 15 '10 at 5:21
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13 Answers

up vote 64 down vote accepted

I just did this out of interest. I agree it's not the right thing to do, but I think it should be the op's decision... Also the code could easily be extended to add functionality, rather than take it away (like a more advanced clipboard, or Ctrl+s triggering a server-side save).

$(document).ready(function()
{
    var ctrlDown = false;
    var ctrlKey = 17, vKey = 86, cKey = 67;

    $(document).keydown(function(e)
    {
        if (e.keyCode == ctrlKey) ctrlDown = true;
    }).keyup(function(e)
    {
        if (e.keyCode == ctrlKey) ctrlDown = false;
    });

    $(".no-copy-paste").keydown(function(e)
    {
        if (ctrlDown && (e.keyCode == vKey || e.keyCode == cKey)) return false;
    });
});

Also just to clarify, this script requires the jQuery library.

EDIT: removed 3 redundant lines (involving e.which) thanks to Tim Down's suggestion (see comments)

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2  
Why the keydown and keyup handlers on document? You can test for the Ctrl key in the $(".no-copy-paste").keydown handler. Also, there's no need for the e.keyCode || e.which bit: e.keyCode works in all browsers that e.which works in, so e.which will never be used. Perhaps you were thinking of how you get a character code from a keypress event? Finally, this will do nothing about pastes from the context or edit menus, but I suppose the OP didn't ask directly about that. –  Tim Down May 25 '10 at 13:34
    
@Tim: Ctrl key handlers on document to be general - as they may not want the ctrlDown variable to be exclusively linked to the no-copy-paste input(s). This is perhaps OTT. Thanks for the e.which tip - I've since spent half an hour researching the different use cases of e.keyCode and e.which with keydown() and keypress(), and what a mess (especially in firefox)! –  jackocnr May 25 '10 at 17:49
    
although this answers the question on how to detect ctrl-c and ctrl-v, other ways of pasting (rightclick-paste) are not (yet) detected this way. –  Konerak May 25 '10 at 18:04
1  
jackocnr: I recommend Jan Wolter's JavaScript key handling article: unixpapa.com/js/key.html I've used it for reference many times and not found an error. –  Tim Down May 25 '10 at 18:30
3  
Dude! Thanks! This is exactly what I needed to enable users to select an "element" (calendar entry) in a web app I'm writing, hit ctrl + c to "copy" it, then ctrl+v to "paste" it, all without actually interacting with the allmighty blessed clipboard. ctrl+c I remember what they're clicked on, ctrl+v I duplicate it, everyone wins. –  Dan F May 2 '12 at 11:26
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With jquery you can easy detect copy, paste, etc by binding the function:

$("#textA").bind('copy', function() {
    $('span').text('copy behaviour detected!')
}); 
$("#textA").bind('paste', function() {
    $('span').text('paste behaviour detected!')
}); 
$("#textA").bind('cut', function() {
    $('span').text('cut behaviour detected!')
});

More information here: http://www.mkyong.com/jquery/how-to-detect-copy-paste-and-cut-behavior-with-jquery/

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Working awesome, thanks! –  fnkr May 14 '13 at 17:16
    
unaware of these killer handlers. cheers. –  Jordan Arseno Jul 26 '13 at 11:40
    
awesome, thanks. –  Mota Chuha Oct 8 '13 at 6:40
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While it can be annoying when used as an anti-piracy measure, I can see there might be some instances where it'd be legitimate, so:

function disableCopyPaste(elm) {
    // Disable cut/copy/paste key events
    elm.onkeydown = interceptKeys

    // Disable right click events
    elm.oncontextmenu = function() {
        return false
    }
}

function interceptKeys(evt) {
    evt = evt||window.event // IE support
    var c = evt.keyCode
    var ctrlDown = evt.ctrlKey||evt.metaKey // Mac support

    // Check for Alt+Gr (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AltGr_key)
    if (ctrlDown && evt.altKey) return true

    // Check for ctrl+c, v and x
    else if (ctrlDown && c==67) return false // c
    else if (ctrlDown && c==86) return false // v
    else if (ctrlDown && c==88) return false // x

    // Otherwise allow
    return true
}

I've used event.ctrlKey rather than checking for the key code as on most browsers on Mac OS X ctrl/alt "down" and "up" events are never triggered, so the only way to detect is to use event.ctrlKey in the e.g. c event after the ctrl key is held down. I've also substituted ctrlKey with metaKey for macs.

Limitations of this method:

  • Opera doesn't allow disabling right click events

  • Drag and drop between browser windows can't be prevented as far as I know.

  • The edit->copy menu item in e.g. Firefox can still allow copy/pasting.

  • There's also no guarantee that for people with different keyboard layouts/locales that copy/paste/cut are the same key codes (though layouts often just follow the same standard as English), but blanket "disable all control keys" mean that select all etc will also be disabled so I think that's a compromise which needs to be made.
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There's another way of doing this: onpaste, oncopy and oncut events can be registered and cancelled in IE, Firefox, Chrome, Safari (with some minor problems), the only major browser that doesn't allow cancelling these events is Opera.

As you can see in my other answer intercepting ctrl+v and ctrl+c comes with many side effects, and it still doesn't prevent users from pasting using the Firefox Edit menu etc.

function disable_cutcopypaste(e) {
    var fn = function(evt) {
        // IE-specific lines
        evt = evt||window.event
        evt.returnValue = false

        // Other browser support
        if (evt.preventDefault) 
            evt.preventDefault()
        return false
    }
    e.onbeforepaste = e.onbeforecopy = e.onbeforecut = fn
    e.onpaste = e.oncopy = e.oncut = fn
}

Safari still has some minor problems with this method (it clears the clipboard in place of cut/copy when preventing default) but that bug appears to have been fixed in Chrome now.

See also: http://www.quirksmode.org/dom/events/cutcopypaste.html and the associated test page http://www.quirksmode.org/dom/events/tests/cutcopypaste.html for more information.

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Live Demo : http://jsfiddle.net/abdennour/ba54W/

$(document).ready(function() {

    $("#textA").bind({
        copy : function(){
            $('span').text('copy behaviour detected!');
        },
        paste : function(){
            $('span').text('paste behaviour detected!');
        },
        cut : function(){
            $('span').text('cut behaviour detected!');
        }
    });

}); 
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I wrote a jQuery plugin, which catches keystrokes. It can be used to enable multiple language script input in html forms without the OS (except the fonts). Its about 300 lines of code, maybe you like to take a look:

Generally, be careful with such kind of alterations. I wrote the plugin for a client because other solutions weren't available.

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Why is everyone so down on this question? It's a good question. Most of the people that are inputting are not programmers. They are likely to paste absurd things into fields when they can. Of course it is ultimately up to the client and server code to handle this.

People will continue to paste from Word documents into WYSWYG editors like CKeditor (which has a Paste from Word option that most people don't even use) and continue to wonder why their page looks terrible. So in some cases you might need to prevent a user from pasting.

By the way, I pasted this here from Word ;)

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instead of onkeypress, use onkeydown.

<input type=text name=Txt
     onkeydown="if(event.ctrlKey && event.keyCode==86){return false;}">
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You can listen to the keypress event, and halt the default event (entering the text) if it matches the specific keycodes

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i already have your problem and i solved it by the following code .. that accept only numbers

$('#<%= mobileTextBox.ClientID %>').keydown(function(e) {
            ///// e.which Values
            // 8  : BackSpace , 46 : Delete , 37 : Left , 39 : Rigth , 144: Num Lock 
            if (e.which != 8 && e.which != 46 && e.which != 37 && e.which != 39 && e.which != 144
                && (e.which < 96 || e.which > 105 )) {
                return false;
            }
        });

you can detect ctrl id e.which == 17

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Don't forget that, while you might be able to detect and block Ctrl+C/V, you can still alter the value of a certain field.
Best example for this is Chrome's Inspect Element function, this allows you to change the value-property of a field.

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function noCopyMouse(e) {
    if (event.button == 2 || event.button == 3) {
        alert('You are prompted to type this twice for a reason!');
        return false;
    }
    return true;
}

function noCopyKey(e) {
    var forbiddenKeys = new Array('c','x','v');
    var isCtrl;

        if(window.event) {
        if(window.event.ctrlKey)
            isCtrl = true;
        else
            isCtrl = false;
        }
        else {
                if(e.ctrlKey)
                    isCtrl = true;
                else
                    isCtrl = false;
        }

    if(isCtrl) {
        for(i=0; iif(forbiddenKeys[i] == String.fromCharCode(window.event.keyCode).toLowerCase()) {
                alert('You are prompted to type this twice for a reason!');
                return false;
            }
            }
    }
    return true;
}

And now to reference those methods in the textboxes that you wish to restrict:

<input name="txtTest" id="txtTest" type="textbox" onmousedown="javascript:return noCopyMouse(event);" onkeykown="javascript:return noCopyKey(event);"  />
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4  
Don't put javascript: at the start of event handler attributes. It serves no purpose and only works by coincidence. More importantly, this solution will not work: in keydown events, the keyCode property of the event is a key code rather than a character code, and they are not generally the same. Passing a key code to String.fromCharCode will have no meaning and will not do what you want. –  Tim Down May 25 '10 at 11:19
1  
Also, it almost goes without saying that this is a really bad thing to do, as mentioned by others here. –  Tim Down May 25 '10 at 11:20
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There is some ways to prevent it.

However the user will be always able to turn the javascript off or just look on the source code of the page.

Some examples (require jQuery)

/**
* Stop every keystroke with ctrl key pressed
*/
$(".textbox").keydown(function(){
    if (event.ctrlKey==true) {
        return false;
    }
});

/**
* Clear all data of clipboard on focus
*/
$(".textbox").focus(function(){
    if ( window.clipboardData ) {
        window.clipboardData.setData('text','');
    }
});

/**
* Block the paste event
*/
$(".textbox").bind('paste',function(e){return false;});

Edit: How Tim Down said, this functions are all browser dependents.

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1  
This has a number of problems: first, it won't work in browsers that don't have a paste event, which includes all versions of Firefox prior to version 3. Second, window.clipboardData is IE only and I believe is now disabled by default in IE. Third, disabling all keydown events where the Ctrl key is pressed is excessive: you prevent useful keyboard shortcuts such as Ctrl-A (select all) and Ctrl-Z (undo). Fourth, as mentioned by others, this is a really bad thing to do. –  Tim Down May 25 '10 at 11:25
    
You are right about that don't working on every browser. Nobody The ctrl block is annoying indeed. It was handy once when a client wanted to block the "Confirmation Email and Password" field. –  Gustavo Cardoso May 25 '10 at 11:38
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