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By default Xdebug will dump any exception regardless of whether it is caught or not:

try {
    throw new Exception();
}
catch (Exception $e) {
}
echo 'life goes on';

With XDebug enabled and the default settings this piece of code will actually output something like the following (nicely formatted):

( ! ) Exception: in /test.php on line 3 Call Stack
#   Time    Memory  Function    Location 1  0.0003  52596   {main}( )   ../test.php:0
life goes on

Is it possible to disable this behaviour and have it dumping only the uncaught exceptions?

Thanks in advance.

UPDATE: I'm about to conclude that this is a bug, since xdebug.show_exception_trace is disabled by default yet it doesn't behave as expected (using Xdebug v2.0.5 with PHP 5.2.10 on Ubuntu 9.10).

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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Change the xdebug.show_exception_trace option (note it's not enabled by default).

xdebug.show_exception_trace

Type: integer, Default value: 0

When this setting is set to 1, Xdebug will show a stack trace whenever an exception is raised - even if this exception is actually caught.

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I agree this has something to do with xdebug.show_exception_trace. I think that when set to 0 it should ignore caught exceptions, but somehow this doesn't work even when disabling it explicitly. –  nuqqsa May 25 '10 at 12:06
    
Talk to Derick on #php.pecl @ EFNet or use the bug tracker at bugs.xdebug.org –  Artefacto May 25 '10 at 12:48
    
This last comment makes your answer complete :) I'm definitely going to report this bug in case I can still reproduce it in 2.1.0RCx. Thanks. –  nuqqsa May 28 '10 at 11:36
    
having the same problem here. Did you report the bug? –  Quamis Aug 20 '13 at 7:36

If your code is namespaced, the catch block should reference \Exception -- with the backslash -- if there's no backslash then PHP will look for Exception in your current namespace. This usually fails and the uncaught exception is passed to Xdebug.

The following code passes the exception to Xdebug:

namespace foo;

try {
    new \PDO(0);
} catch (Exception $e) {
    echo "Caught!";
}
// Fatal error: Uncaught exception...

Adding a backslash before Exception will look for (and find) Exception in the global namespace:

namespace foo;

try {
    new \PDO(0);
} catch (\Exception $e) {
    echo "Caught!";
}
// Exception caught correctly

Manually throwing exceptions can be confusing (which is why I used PDO above). If we try to throw an Exception from the current namespace, PHP tells us Exception doesn't exist there:

namespace foo;

try {
    throw new Exception();
} catch (Exception $e) {
    echo "Caught!";
}
// Fatal error: Class 'foo\Exception' not found

Throwing a global exception without a global reference in the catch block fails differently:

namespace foo;

try {
    throw new \Exception();  // global Exception
} catch (Exception $e) {
    echo "Caught!";
}
// Fatal error: Uncaught exception 'Exception' in...

In light of all this, it's probably a good idea to always prefix the catch's Exception with a backslash.

namespace foo;

try {
    throw new \Exception();
} catch (\Exception $e) {
    echo "Caught!";
}
// Exception caught correctly
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