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I'm looking to implement a few nicer ways to use List in a couple of apps I'm working on. My current implementation looks like this.

MyPage.aspx.cs

protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    BLL.PostCollection oPost = new BLL.PostCollection();
    oPost.OpenRecent();
    rptPosts.DataSource = oArt;
    rptPosts.DataBind();
}

BLL Class(s)

public class Post
{
    public int PostId { get; set; }
    public string PostTitle { get; set; }
    public string PostContent { get; set; }
    public string PostCreatedDate { get; set; }

    public void OpenRecentInitFromRow(DataRow row)
    {
        this.PostId = (int) row["id"];
        this.PostTitle = (string) row["title"];
        this.PostContent = (string) row["content"];
        this.PostCreatedDate = (DateTime) row["createddate"];
    }
}
public class PostCollection : List<Post>
{
    public void OpenRecent()
    {
        DataSet ds = DbProvider.Instance().Post_ListRecent();
        foreach (DataRow row in ds.Tables[0].Rows)
        {
            Post oPost = new Post();
            oPost.OpenRecentInitFromRow(row);
            Add(oPost);
        }
    }
}

Now while this is working all well and good, I'm just wondering if there is any way to improve it, and just make it cleaner that having to use the two different classes do to something I think can happen in just one class or using an interface.

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Is there any way of having your DB layer return something other than a table (e.g. using a datareader to populate your list of objects there)? –  Paddy May 25 '10 at 13:36
2  
This might be personal preference, but I'd also ditch the hungarian notation from your page code. –  Paddy May 25 '10 at 13:37
    
@Paddy - I'm working on it! I only use it for some things like repeaters where it helps me remember. But it's all slowly being weeded out of the code. –  Tim Meers May 25 '10 at 14:32
    
well that's ok then :) –  Paddy May 25 '10 at 15:25

5 Answers 5

up vote 17 down vote accepted

For one thing, I wouldn't derive from List<T> - you aren't really specializing the behaviour.

I'd also suggest that you could make Post immutable (at least externally), and write a static method (or constructor) to create one based on a DataRow:

public static Post FromDataRow(DataRow row)

Likewise you can have a list method:

public static List<Post> RecentPosts()

which returns them. Admittedly that might be better as an instance method in some sort of DAL class, which will allow mocking etc. Alternatively, in Post:

public static List<Post> ListFromDataSet(DataSet ds)

Now, as for the use of List<T> itself - are you using .NET 3.5? If so, you could make this considerably neater using LINQ:

public static List<Post> ListFromDataSet(DataSet ds)
{
    return ds.Tables[0].AsEnumerable()
                       .Select(row => Post.FromDataRow(row))
                       .ToList();
}
share|improve this answer
7  
+1 for "Don't derive from List" - very rarely, if ever, do you want to do that. Favor composition to inheritance! (Effective Java, item 16) –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft May 25 '10 at 13:49
    
There's not even need for composition in this case. –  Khnle - Kevin Le May 25 '10 at 13:54
2  
Also, specifically don't derive from List<T>. It's generally better to inherit Collection<T> because it gives you the Add, Remove etc methods you can override –  RichK May 25 '10 at 13:54
    
Hmm it looks like I'm going to really have to do some work trying to figure out how to implement this. I am using 3.5 currently for this so I will for sure be using that LINQ method, I just need to figure out how to get it all working together. –  Tim Meers May 25 '10 at 15:05
    
Got it! Thanks for the push in the right direction!! –  Tim Meers May 26 '10 at 17:53

Are you deriving from List<T> because you want to offer other consumers of PostCollection the ability to Add and Remove items? I'm guessing not, and that you actually just want a way to expose a collection you can bind to. If so, you could consider an iterator, perhaps:

class BLL {
    ...

    public IEnumerable<Post> RecentPosts {
        get {
            DataSet ds = DbProvider.Instance().Post_ListRecent(); 
            foreach (DataRow row in ds.Tables[0].Rows) 
            { 
                Post oPost = new Post(); 
                oPost.OpenRecentInitFromRow(row); 
                yield return oPost;
            } 
        }
    }    

    ...
}

Notwithstanding the fact that this might be considered poor form (in that we have a property getter that might be making a network call), this iterator approach will do away with the overhead of calling OpenRecentInitFromRow for Posts that are never enumerated.

You also become agnostic as to how potential consumers of your Posts might want to consume them. Code that absolutely, positively has to have every Post can do ToList(), but other code might want to use a LINQ query that short-circuits the enumeration after the right Post is found.

share|improve this answer
    
After working with another IEnumerable<> using the yield return xxx I really like how it works. At this time I'm still needing to work with all the posts to set up some caching and paging, but I'll be revisiting it for some other datasets in the near future. –  Tim Meers Jul 20 '10 at 12:48

Edit: John Skeet's answer is probably a better option. But if you want to make just a few simple changes, read on:

Place the database access code, OpenRecentInitFromRow into the PostCollection and treat that as a Post manager class. That way the Post class is a plain old Data Transfer Object.

public class Post
{
    public int PostId { get; set; }
    public string PostTitle { get; set; }
    public string PostContent { get; set; }
    public string PostCreatedDate { get; set; }
}

public class PostCollection : List<Post>
{
    public void OpenRecent()
    {
        DataSet ds = DbProvider.Instance().Post_ListRecent();
        foreach (DataRow row in ds.Tables[0].Rows)
        {
            Add(LoadPostFromRow(row));
        }
    }

    private Post LoadPostFromRow(DataRow row)
    {
        Post post = new Post();
        post.PostId = (int) row["id"];
        post.PostTitle = (string) row["title"];
        post.PostContent = (string) row["content"];
        post.PostCreatedDate = (DateTime) row["createddate"];
        return post;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I like the idea of this. But in the end I'm trying to do away with having these two classes where in one would do the trick. Also I've never liked the PostCollection class that I"m using I think it looks ugly not to mention I'm sure there are performance overheads to this approach....well maybe, it works well enough and I have lots of memory and clock cycles to spare!! –  Tim Meers May 25 '10 at 15:02

I'm looking to implement a few nicer ways to use List

That seems like an odd request. The "List" type is a means, rarely an end. With that in mind, one nicer way to accomplish your real end is to use IEnumerable rather than List, because that List forces you to keep your entire collection in memory while IEnumerable only requires one object at a time. The trick is just that you have to wire everything in your processing stream, from the data layer all the way up through presentation, to use it.

I have a good example in the link below about how to do this in a very clean way:
http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2862428/fastest-method-for-sql-server-inserts-updates-selects/2862490#2862490

Depending on your existing data layer code you may be able to skim much of the first half of the (long) post - the main point is that you use an iterator block to turn an SqlDataReader into an IEnumerable<IDataRecord>. Once you have that, it's pretty straightforward the rest of the way through.

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Thanks for the tips, I'll be looking at this as well for another app thats just starting out and I want to be sure to make to as good as possible, the first time! –  Tim Meers May 26 '10 at 17:55

You could do this:

protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    BLL.PostCollection oPost = new BLL.PostCollection();
    rptPosts.DataSource = Post.OpenRecent();
    rptPosts.DataBind();
}
public class Post
{
    public int PostId { get; set; }
    public string PostTitle { get; set; }
    public string PostContent { get; set; }
    public string PostCreatedDate { get; set; }

    public void OpenRecentInitFromRow(DataRow row)
    {
        this.PostId = (int) row["id"];
        this.PostTitle = (string) row["title"];
        this.PostContent = (string) row["content"];
        this.PostCreatedDate = (DateTime) row["createddate"];
    }

    public static List<Post> OpenRecent()
    {
        DataSet ds = DbProvider.Instance().Post_ListRecent();
        foreach (DataRow row in ds.Tables[0].Rows)
        {
            Post oPost = new Post();
            oPost.OpenRecentInitFromRow(row);
            Add(oPost); //Not sure what this is doing
        }
        //need to return a List<Post>
    }
}
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