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Why do you need to place columns you create yourself (for example select 1 as "number") after HAVING and not WHERE in MySQL?

And are there any downsides instead of doing WHERE 1 (writing the whole definition instead of a column name)?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 129 down vote accepted

Why is it that you need to place columns you create yourself (for example "select 1 as number") after HAVING and not WHERE in MySQL?

WHERE is applied before GROUP BY, HAVING is applied after (and can filter on aggregates).

In general, you can reference aliases in neither of these clauses, but MySQL allows referencing SELECT level aliases in GROUP BY, ORDER BY and HAVING.

And are there any downsides instead of doing "WHERE 1" (writing the whole definition instead of a column name)

If your calculated expression does not contain any aggregates, putting it into the WHERE clause will most probably be more efficient.

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23  
you saved my career. :) –  Marko Aleksić Nov 26 '13 at 21:28

All answers upon didn't hit the key point.

Assume we have a table:

CREATE TABLE `table` (
 `id` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
 `value` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL,
 PRIMARY KEY (`id`),
 KEY `value` (`value`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8

And have 10 columns with both id and value from 1 to 10:

INSERT INTO `table`(`id`, `value`) VALUES (1, 1),(2, 2),(3, 3),(4, 4),(5, 5),(6, 6),(7, 7),(8, 8),(9, 9),(10, 10);

Try the following 2 queries:

SELECT `value` v FROM `table` WHERE `value`>5; -- Get 5 rows
SELECT `value` v FROM `table` HAVING `value`>5; -- Get 5 rows

You will get exactly the same results, you can see the HAVING clause can work without GROUP BY clause.

Here's the difference:

SELECT `value` v FROM `table` WHERE `v`>5;

Error #1054 - Unknown column 'v' in 'where clause'

SELECT `value` v FROM `table` HAVING `v`>5; -- Get 5 rows

WHERE clause requires a condition to be a column in a table, but HAVING clause can use both column and alias.

This is because WHERE clause filters data before select, but HAVING clause filters data after select.

So put the conditions in WHERE clause will be more effective if you have many many rows in a table.

Try EXPLAIN to see the key difference:

EXPLAIN SELECT `value` v FROM `table` WHERE `value`>5;
+----+-------------+-------+-------+---------------+-------+---------+------+------+--------------------------+
| id | select_type | table | type  | possible_keys | key   | key_len | ref  | rows | Extra                    |
+----+-------------+-------+-------+---------------+-------+---------+------+------+--------------------------+
|  1 | SIMPLE      | table | range | value         | value | 4       | NULL |    5 | Using where; Using index |
+----+-------------+-------+-------+---------------+-------+---------+------+------+--------------------------+

EXPLAIN SELECT `value` v FROM `table` having `value`>5;
+----+-------------+-------+-------+---------------+-------+---------+------+------+-------------+
| id | select_type | table | type  | possible_keys | key   | key_len | ref  | rows | Extra       |
+----+-------------+-------+-------+---------------+-------+---------+------+------+-------------+
|  1 | SIMPLE      | table | index | NULL          | value | 4       | NULL |   10 | Using index |
+----+-------------+-------+-------+---------------+-------+---------+------+------+-------------+

You can see either WHERE or HAVING uses index, but the rows are different.

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3  
I appreciate that you mentioned EXPLAIN! –  paiego Dec 6 '13 at 23:14

The main difference is that WHERE cannot be used on grouped item (such as SUM(number)) whereas HAVING can.

The reason is the WHERE is done before the grouping and HAVING is done after the grouping is done.

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HAVING is used to filter on aggregations in your GROUP BY.

For example, to check for duplicate names:

SELECT Name FROM Usernames
GROUP BY Name
HAVING COUNT(*) > 1
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It's true to some extant. You can still put your whole 'Where' in the having clause. –  David Brunelle May 25 '10 at 14:28

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