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(Using Oracle)

I have a table with key/value pairs like this:

create table MESSAGE_INDEX
(
  KEY               VARCHAR2(256) not null,
  VALUE             VARCHAR2(4000) not null,
  MESSAGE_ID        NUMBER not null
)

I now want to find all the messages where key = 'someKey' and value is 'val1', 'val2' or 'val3' - OR value is null in which case there will be no entry in the table at all. This is to save space; there would be a large number of keys with null values if I stored them all.

I think this works:

SELECT message_id
FROM message_index idx
WHERE ((key = 'someKey' AND value IN ('val1', 'val2', 'val3'))
      OR NOT EXISTS (SELECT 1 FROM message_index WHERE key = 'someKey'
      AND idx.message_id = message_id))

But is is extremely slow. Takes 8 seconds with 700K records in message_index and there will be many more records and more search criteria when moving outside of my test environment.

Primary key is key, value, message_id:

  add constraint PK_KEY_VALUE primary key (KEY, VALUE, MESSAGE_ID)

And I added another index for message_id, to speed up searching for missing keys:

create index IDX_MESSAGE_ID on MESSAGE_INDEX (MESSAGE_ID)

I will be doing several of these key/value lookups in every search, not just one as shown above. So far I am doing them nested, where output id's of one level is the input to the next. E.g.:

SELECT message_id from message_index
WHERE (key/value compare)
AND message_id IN
  (
    SELECT ... and so on
  )

What can I do to speed this up?

share|improve this question
    
What do you mean by "value is null in which case there will be no entry in the table at all"? There's no row when VALUE would be null? If so then your query doesn't appear to work –  CodeByMoonlight May 25 '10 at 14:12
    
Why does your PRIMARY KEY include value? Is it a valid situation that a message has two different values for one key? –  Quassnoi May 25 '10 at 14:13
    
Value is in the index to quickly find a specific value for a key. It is my understanding that a scan through all values for a given key would be needed if it wasn't included in the index. Is this wrong? –  Rabbit May 25 '10 at 14:37
    
You are right that an index on (KEY, VALUE) is useful for searching for specific key/value pairs. But you can create any indexes you want independently of the primary key. Logically, I would guess that your real primary key -- i.e. the unique identifier of a row in the table -- is (MESSAGE_ID, KEY). –  Dave Costa May 25 '10 at 14:48
    
@user: this is right, but this imposes a flaw in you model: you can insert two different values of the same key. You need to create a plain, non-unique index on (message_id, key, value) and then create a UNIQUE constraint (or a PRIMARY KEY) on (message_id, key). The index will be reused to police the constraint. –  Quassnoi May 25 '10 at 14:52

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

If you have a key that all messages are guaranteed to have:

SELECT  message_id
FROM    message_index mi
WHERE   mi.key = 'GuaranteedKey'
        AND mi.message_id IN
        (
        SELECT  message_id
        FROM    message_index mk
        WHERE   mk.key = 'someKey'
                AND mk.value IN (1, 2, 3)
        )
UNION ALL
SELECT  message_id
FROM    message_index mi
WHERE   mi.key = 'GuaranteedKey'
        AND mi.message_id NOT IN
        (
        SELECT  message_id
        FROM    message_index mk
        WHERE   mk.key = 'someKey'
        )

If you don't:

WITH    mi AS
        (
        SELECT  DISTINCT message_id
        FROM    message_index
        )
SELECT  message_id
FROM    mi
WHERE   mi.message_id IN
        (
        SELECT  message_id
        FROM    message_index mk
        WHERE   mk.key = 'someKey'
                AND mk.value IN (1, 2, 3)
        )
UNION ALL
SELECT  message_id
FROM    mi
WHERE   mi.message_id NOT IN
        (
        SELECT  message_id
        FROM    message_index mk
        WHERE   mk.key = 'someKey'
        )
share|improve this answer
    
I don't see how your second sample would include records where key is not present at all. mi.Key = 'GuarenteedKey' (did you mean NonGuarenteedKey?) will never match. –  Rabbit May 25 '10 at 14:45
    
@user: sorry, just forgot to remove the condition. –  Quassnoi May 25 '10 at 14:47
    
Could you show me how to combine multiple criteria? Like also having 'someKey2' matching value (4, 5, 6). –  Rabbit May 25 '10 at 15:50
    
@user: just add another IN predicate into the WHERE clause. –  Quassnoi May 25 '10 at 15:57

"What can I do to speed this up?"

Use a normalized data model rather than a key-value store. Reconstructing the (especially optional) attributes of a message is going to be a continual performance bugbear.

share|improve this answer
    
New keys will be added while the system is in production, so normalizing would mean adding new columns to a large table at runtime. But maybe this isn't a problem? I'm beginning to consider this since it is so much simpler. –  Rabbit May 26 '10 at 6:55
    
ALTER TABLE ... ADD COLUMN is pretty trivial if the existing rows are 'happy' with the new value being null. 11g can even cope with assigning a default to the existing columns without a hassle. Only takes a few seconds, though would need an exclusive lock for that time. If you need to be running 24x7 99.999%, then you may need some of the enterprise options for reorganisation. –  Gary Myers May 26 '10 at 23:04

To speed this up you convert subselects into joins, so your query would become something like this:

SELECT idx.message_id
FROM message_index idx
LEFT JOIN message_index idx2 ON idx2.message_id = idx.message_id AND idx2.key = 'someKey'
WHERE (idx.key = 'someKey' AND idx.value IN ('val1', 'val2', 'val3'))
   OR idx2.message_id IS NULL
share|improve this answer
    
In Oracle, NOT IN and LEFT JOIN / IS NULL perform the same: explainextended.com/2009/09/17/… –  Quassnoi May 25 '10 at 15:56
    
Thanks for the link. –  Imre L May 26 '10 at 7:26

I'm not sure your second filter is what you are looking for. Basically the subquery:

(SELECT 1
   FROM message_index
  WHERE key = 'someKey'
    AND idx.message_id = message_id)

won't contain rows only if there is no key 'someKey' for that message_id in the table.

If this is really what you want, and since all columns are NOT NULL, you could rewrite the query with a NOT IN (that will probably be optimized into an HASH ANTI-JOIN):

SELECT message_id
  FROM message_index idx
 WHERE (key = 'someKey' AND VALUE IN ('val1', 'val2', 'val3'))
UNION ALL
SELECT message_id
  FROM message_index    
 WHERE message_id NOT IN (SELECT message_id 
                            FROM message_index 
                           WHERE key = 'someKey');
share|improve this answer

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