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How can I validate a username and password against Active Directory? I simply want to check if a username and password are correct.

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2  
Several solutions presented here lack the ability to differentiate between a wrong user / password, and a password that needs to be changed. That can be done in the following way: –  Søren Mors Jun 14 '12 at 12:49
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11 Answers

If you work on .NET 3.5 or newer, you can use the System.DirectoryServices.AccountManagement namespace and easily verify your credentials:

// create a "principal context" - e.g. your domain (could be machine, too)
using(PrincipalContext pc = new PrincipalContext(ContextType.Domain, "YOURDOMAIN"))
{
    // validate the credentials
    bool isValid = pc.ValidateCredentials("myuser", "mypassword");
}

It's simple, it's reliable, it's 100% C# managed code on your end - what more can you ask for? :-)

Read all about it here:

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3  
Are you sure??? I got a PrincipalServerdownException when I tried this... –  Christian Payne May 29 '09 at 4:59
5  
FYI, PrincipalContext implements IDisposable, so better remember to wrap this in a using clause. –  Jeremy McGee Jul 22 '10 at 10:51
21  
In my domain, I had to specify pc.ValidateCredentials("myuser", "mypassword", ContextOptions.Negotiate) or I would get System.DirectoryServices.Protocols.DirectoryOperationException: The server cannot handle directory requests. –  Alex Peck Jun 29 '11 at 14:14
4  
If a password's expired or the accounts disabled, then ValidateCredentials will return false. Unfortuantly, it doesn't tell you why it's returned false (which is a pity as it means I can't do something sensible like redirect the user to change their password). –  Chris J Sep 8 '11 at 15:10
32  
Also beware the 'Guest' account -- if the domain-level Guest account is enabled, ValidateCredentials returns true if you give it a non-existant user. As a result, you may want to call UserPrinciple.FindByIdentity to see if the passed in user ID exists first. –  Chris J Sep 8 '11 at 15:17
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We do this on our Intranet

You have to use System.DirectoryServices;

Here are the guts of the code

DirectoryEntry adsEntry = new DirectoryEntry(path, strAccountId, strPassword);
DirectorySearcher adsSearcher = new DirectorySearcher(adsEntry);
//adsSearcher.Filter = "(&(objectClass=user)(objectCategory=person))";
adsSearcher.Filter = "(sAMAccountName=" + strAccountId + ")";

try 
{
    SearchResult adsSearchResult = adsSearcher.FindOne();
    bSucceeded = true;

    strAuthenticatedBy = "Active Directory";
    strError = "User has been authenticated by Active Directory.";
    adsEntry.Close();
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
    // Failed to authenticate. Most likely it is caused by unknown user
    // id or bad strPassword.
    strError = ex.Message;
    adsEntry.Close();
}
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Does this code not need to run as an AD user itself? –  bzlm Nov 14 '08 at 16:13
3  
What do you put in "path"? The name of the domain? The name of the server? The LDAP path to the domain? The LDAP path to the server? –  Ian Boyd Dec 1 '08 at 15:00
1  
Answer1: No we run it as a web service so it can be called from multiple locations in the main web app. Answer2: Path contains LDAP info... LDAP://DC=domainname1,DC=domainname2,DC=com –  Dining Philanderer Dec 1 '08 at 18:21
    
All I was missing was the DirectoryEntry wrapper around DirectorySearcher. I've been looking for this all day, thanks! –  Mohgeroth May 4 '12 at 19:15
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very simple solution using DirectoryServices:

using System.DirectoryServices;

//srvr = ldap server, e.g. LDAP://domain.com
//usr = user name
//pwd = user password
public bool IsAuthenticated(string srvr, string usr, string pwd)
{
    bool authenticated = false;

    try
    {
        DirectoryEntry entry = new DirectoryEntry(srvr, usr, pwd);
        object nativeObject = entry.NativeObject;
        authenticated = true;
    }
    catch (DirectoryServicesCOMException cex)
    {
        //not authenticated; reason why is in cex
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        //not authenticated due to some other exception [this is optional]
    }

    return authenticated;
}

the NativeObject access is required to detect a bad user/password

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This code doesn't work. Constructing a DirectoryEntry() object with invalid credentials does not throw an exception. –  Ian Boyd Dec 1 '08 at 14:56
    
@[anonymousstackoverflowuser.openid.org]: eek! good catch! I accidentally posted the wrong code. Code corrected now. Thank you very much! –  Steven A. Lowe Dec 1 '08 at 15:11
1  
This worked create thanks! –  corymathews May 28 '09 at 19:52
2  
This code is bad because it's also doing an authorization check (check if the user is allowed to read active directory information). The username and password can be valid, but the user not allowed to read info - and get an exception. In other words you can have a valid username&password, but still get an exception. –  Ian Boyd Aug 18 '11 at 13:49
1  
i am actually in the process of asking for the native equivalent of PrincipleContext - which only exists in .NET 3.5. But if you are using .NET 3.5 or newer you should use PrincipleContext –  Ian Boyd Aug 18 '11 at 16:57
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Unfortunately there is no "simple" way to check a users credentials on AD.

With every method presented so far, you may get a false-negative: A user's creds will be valid, however AD will return false under certain circumstances:

  • User is required to Change Password at Next Logon.
  • User's password has expired.

ActiveDirectory will not allow you to use LDAP to determine if a password is invalid due to the fact that a user must change password or if their password has expired.

To determine password change or password expired, you may call Win32:LogonUser(), and check the windows error code for the following 2 constants:

  • ERROR_PASSWORD_MUST_CHANGE = 1907
  • ERROR_PASSWORD_EXPIRED = 1330
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May I ask where you got the devinitions for Expired and Must_Change... Found them nowhere but here :) –  mabstrei Nov 19 '12 at 10:13
1  
From an MSDN article: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/… –  Alan Nov 19 '12 at 16:38
    
Thank you very much... –  mabstrei Nov 20 '12 at 8:59
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Probably easiest way is to PInvoke LogonUser Win32 API.e.g.

http://www.pinvoke.net/default.aspx/advapi32/LogonUser.html

MSDN Reference here...

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa378184.aspx

Definitely want to use logon type

LOGON32_LOGON_NETWORK (3)

This creates a lightweight token only - perfect for AuthN checks. (other types can be used to build interactive sessions etc.)

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1  
There are simpler ways of doing this in pure .net code. See answers below. –  cciotti Dec 1 '08 at 15:25
    
As @Alan points out, LogonUser API has many useful traits beyond a System.DirectoryServices call. –  stephbu Dec 1 '08 at 17:48
3  
@cciotti: No, that's wrong. The BEST way to correctly authenticate someone is to use LogonUserAPI as @stephbu write. All other methods described in this post will NOT WORK 100%. Just a note however, I do believe you have to be domain joined inorder to call LogonUser. –  Alan Apr 20 '09 at 18:28
1  
The LogonUser API requires the user to have the Act as a part of the operating system privelage; which isn't something that users get - and not something you want to be granting to every user in the organization. (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa378184(v=vs.85).aspx) –  Ian Boyd Aug 18 '11 at 13:52
1  
LogonUser only needs Act as part of the operating system for Windows 2000 and below according to support.microsoft.com/kb/180548 ... It looks clean for Server 2003 and higher. –  Chris J Sep 8 '11 at 15:14
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A full .Net solution is to use the classes from the System.DirectoryServices namespace. They allow to query an AD server directly. Here is a small sample that would do this:

using (DirectoryEntry entry = new DirectoryEntry())
{
    entry.Username = "here goes the username you want to validate";
    entry.Password = "here goes the password";

    DirectorySearcher searcher = new DirectorySearcher(entry);

    searcher.Filter = "(objectclass=user)";

    try
    {
        searcher.FindOne();
    }
    catch (COMException ex)
    {
        if (ex.ErrorCode == -2147023570)
        {
            // Login or password is incorrect
        }
    }
}

// FindOne() didn't throw, the credentials are correct

This code directly connects to the AD server, using the credentials provided. If the credentials are invalid, searcher.FindOne() will throw an exception. The ErrorCode is the one corresponding to the "invalid username/password" COM error.

You don't need to run the code as an AD user. In fact, I succesfully use it to query informations on an AD server, from a client outside the domain !

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how about authentication types? i think you forgot it in your code above. :-) by default DirectoryEntry.AuthenticationType is set to Secured right? that code is not going to work on LDAPs that are not secured (Anonymous or None perhaps). am i correct with this? –  jerbersoft Nov 12 '10 at 3:47
    
Are you sure you don't miss something ? Maybe you forgot to specify the Domain. –  Joe.wang Aug 22 '12 at 7:39
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Several solutions presented here lack the ability to differentiate between a wrong user / password, and a password that needs to be changed. That can be done in the following way:

using System;
using System.DirectoryServices.Protocols;
using System.Net;

namespace ProtocolTest
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            try
            {
                LdapConnection connection = new LdapConnection("ldap.fabrikam.com");
                NetworkCredential credential = new NetworkCredential("user", "password");
                connection.Credential = credential;
                connection.Bind();
                Console.WriteLine("logged in");
            }
            catch (LdapException lexc)
            {
                String error = lexc.ServerErrorMessage;
                Console.WriteLine(lexc);
            }
            catch (Exception exc)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(exc);
            }
        }
    }
}

If the users password is wrong, or the user doesn't exists, error will contain

"8009030C: LdapErr: DSID-0C0904DC, comment: AcceptSecurityContext error, data 52e, v1db1",

if the users password needs to be changed, it will contain

"8009030C: LdapErr: DSID-0C0904DC, comment: AcceptSecurityContext error, data 773, v1db1"

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Unfortunately, some AD installations doesn't return the LDAP sub error code, which means that this solution won't work. –  Søren Mors Jun 18 '12 at 9:33
1  
Don't forget to add some references to the project: System.DirectoryServices and System.DirectoryServices.Protocols –  TomXP411 Apr 4 '13 at 22:46
1  
My question, though, is this: how do you get the LDAP server name? If you're writing a portable application, you can't expect the user to know or need to supply the names of AD servers on every network. –  TomXP411 Apr 4 '13 at 22:52
    
I have users which are restricted to logging in to specific workstations; how do I specify the workstation that I am trying the login for? (workstation1 would fail with data 531, workstation2 would work fine, for example) –  akohlsmith Jun 3 at 21:10
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Try this code (NOTE: Reported to not work on windows server 2000)

#region NTLogonUser
#region Direct OS LogonUser Code
[DllImport( "advapi32.dll")]
private static extern bool LogonUser(String lpszUsername, 
    String lpszDomain, String lpszPassword, int dwLogonType, 
    int dwLogonProvider, out int phToken);

[DllImport("Kernel32.dll")]
private static extern int GetLastError();

public static bool LogOnXP(String sDomain, String sUser, String sPassword)
{
   int token1, ret;
   int attmpts = 0;

   bool LoggedOn = false;

   while (!LoggedOn && attmpts < 2)
   {
      LoggedOn= LogonUser(sUser, sDomain, sPassword, 3, 0, out token1);
      if (LoggedOn) return (true);
      else
      {
         switch (ret = GetLastError())
         {
            case (126): ; 
               if (attmpts++ > 2)
                  throw new LogonException(
                      "Specified module could not be found. error code: " + 
                      ret.ToString());
               break;

            case (1314): 
               throw new LogonException(
                  "Specified module could not be found. error code: " + 
                      ret.ToString());

            case (1326): 
               // edited out based on comment
               //  throw new LogonException(
               //   "Unknown user name or bad password.");
            return false;

            default: 
               throw new LogonException(
                  "Unexpected Logon Failure. Contact Administrator");
              }
          }
       }
   return(false);
}
#endregion Direct Logon Code
#endregion NTLogonUser

except you'll need to create your own custom exception for "LogonException"

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Don't use exception handling for returning information from a method. "Unknown user name or bad password" is not exceptional, it is standard behaviour for LogonUser. Just return false. –  Treb Nov 14 '08 at 16:20
    
ahh you're right! old code... Thanks! –  Charles Bretana Nov 14 '08 at 17:47
    
'old code' - sounds very familiar to me ;-) –  Treb Nov 17 '08 at 13:58
    
yes... this was a port from an old VB6 library... written 2003 or so... (when .Net first came out) –  Charles Bretana Nov 17 '08 at 15:18
    
If running on Windows 2000 this code will not work (support.microsoft.com/kb/180548) –  Ian Boyd Dec 1 '08 at 14:58
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If you are stuck with .NET 2.0 and managed code, here is another way that works whith local and domain accounts:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Text;
using System.Security;
using System.Diagnostics;

static public bool Validate(string domain, string username, string password)
{
    try
    {
        Process proc = new Process();
        proc.StartInfo = new ProcessStartInfo()
        {
            FileName = "no_matter.xyz",
            CreateNoWindow = true,
            WindowStyle = ProcessWindowStyle.Hidden,
            WorkingDirectory = Environment.GetFolderPath(Environment.SpecialFolder.CommonApplicationData),
            UseShellExecute = false,
            RedirectStandardError = true,
            RedirectStandardOutput = true,
            RedirectStandardInput = true,
            LoadUserProfile = true,
            Domain = String.IsNullOrEmpty(domain) ? "" : domain,
            UserName = username,
            Password = Credentials.ToSecureString(password)
        };
        proc.Start();
        proc.WaitForExit();
    }
    catch (System.ComponentModel.Win32Exception ex)
    {
        switch (ex.NativeErrorCode)
        {
            case 1326: return false;
            case 2: return true;
            default: throw ex;
        }
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        throw ex;
    }

    return false;
}   
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Works well with local accounts of the machine he launch the script –  eka808 Nov 29 '11 at 10:15
    
BTW, this method is needed to make this works public static SecureString ToSecureString(string PwString) { char[] PasswordChars = PwString.ToCharArray(); SecureString Password = new SecureString(); foreach (char c in PasswordChars) Password.AppendChar(c); ProcessStartInfo foo = new ProcessStartInfo(); foo.Password = Password; return foo.Password; } –  eka808 Nov 29 '11 at 10:19
    
On the contrary, one should use SecureString for passwords anyway. WPF PasswordBox supports it. –  Stephen Drew Apr 9 '12 at 21:07
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Yet another .NET call to quickly authenticate LDAP credentials:

using System.DirectoryServices;

using(var DE = new DirectoryEntry(path, username, password)
{
    try
    {
        DE.RefreshCache(); // This will force credentials validation
    }
    catch (COMException ex)
    {
        // Validation failed - handle how you want
    }
}
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www.c-sharpcorner.com has a nice article on how to do this.

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protected by Community May 17 '11 at 21:08

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