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I am having some trouble getting this simple code to work:

#pragma once
#include <iostream>
#include <string>
using std::string;

class UserController;
#include "UserController.h"
class CreateUserView
{
public:
 CreateUserView(void);
 ~CreateUserView(void);
 UserController* controller;
 void showView();

 string name;
 string lastname;
 string address;
 string email;
 string dateOfBirth;
};

All i need is to set these attributes in the implementation with getline().

CreateUserView::CreateUserView(void)
{

}
void CreateUserView::showView()
{

 cout << endl << "  New User" << endl;
 cout << "--------------------------" << endl;
 cout << "  Name\t\t: ";
 getline(cin, name);

 cout <<  "  Lastname\t: ";
 getline(cin, lastname);

 cout << "  Email\t\t: ";
 getline(cin, email);


 cout << "  ===============================" << endl;
 cout << "   1. SAVE   2.CHANGE   3.CANCEL" << endl;
 cout << "  ===============================" << endl;
 cout << "  choice: ";
 int choice;
 cin >> choice;
 cin.ignore();

 controller->createUser_choice(choice);
}

I keep getting this "Access violation reading location" error at this line:

getline(cin, name);

what's the best way of assigning a value to an std::string attribute of a class? even name = "whatever" is throwing that error!!

thanks

EDIT: a UserController is instantiating the CreateUserView:

CreateUserView *_createUserView;

This how the CreateUserView is being instantiated:

void UserController::createUser()
{
    //Init the Create User View
    if(_createUserView == NULL)
    {
        _createUserView = new CreateUserView();
        _createUserView->controller = this;
    }
    _createUserView->showView();
}
share|improve this question
3  
Could you show us the code where you instantiate CreateUserView and call showView ? –  Péter Török May 25 '10 at 14:33
    
The identifier CreateUserView describes an algorithm, not a type, and should therefor be a function, not a class. –  sbi May 25 '10 at 14:35
1  
Oh yeah, and the only way I can see for this to to blow is to either have string something else than std::string or to work on an invalid CreateUserView object. Unfortunately you are not showing either code. Please post complete, concise, compilable code. –  sbi May 25 '10 at 14:38
1  
@sbi: I thought that at first too, but then thought that perhaps I was parsing it wrong -- I think it's intended as "a view in which you create a user", not "create a view of a user". OTOH, having "ShowView" actually doing modifications seems more problematic. –  Jerry Coffin May 25 '10 at 14:38
    
@Jerry: Ah, I see. Well, nevermind. –  sbi May 25 '10 at 14:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You don't seem the initialize your variable properly:

CreateUserView *_createUserView;

Therefore it is a dangling pointer, not NULL (in C++, with a few exceptions, variables are not initialized automatically to 0). So here

if(_createUserView == NULL)
{
    _createUserView = new CreateUserView();
    _createUserView->controller = this;
}

the if block is not executed, and here

_createUserView->showView();

you get access violation. Initialize your pointer properly to NULL:

CreateUserView *_createUserView = NULL;
share|improve this answer
    
How come it broke on getline() and not the cout calls? or even when calling '_createUserView->showView();' ? –  Default May 25 '10 at 14:55
    
Excellent That did it! thanks mate one question though, this pointer is private attribute of a class and it won't let me initialize it in the header file sayiig: "only static const integral data members can be initialized within a class" how do you go on doing that, using a initialization list maybe? thanks again –  Bach May 25 '10 at 14:56
    
@user259789: You should set it in your .cpp file. You should have all your definitions in the .cpp file ( the foo(){ } 's) and the declarations in the header file ( foo(); ) –  Default May 25 '10 at 15:00
    
@user259789, if it is a nonstatic member, the best is to initialize it in the constructor initialization list. –  Péter Török May 25 '10 at 15:02
1  
@Michael, that is the first statement actually dereferencing the object pointer. Since showView is nonvirtual, the call to it is resolved statically by the compiler, i.e. no need to dereference this. Also, the cout calls don't dereference any members. Still the call is already undefined behaviour, but some compilers will let you get away with it :-) –  Péter Török May 25 '10 at 15:05

Try changing your declaration of the global:

CreateUserView *_createUserView = NULL;
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