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I have an application that uses SmtpClient to send E-Mail, but the E-Mails are not sent until the application closes. I have searched and searched to find a solution to the problem, but I am not able to find one.

The system does have Symantec anti-virus installed, which could possibly be the problem.

Does anybody have a solution to this problem?

Here is the code I am using.

public class EMail
{
    private string server;
    public string Server {get{return this.server;}set{this.server = value;}}
    private string to;
    public string To {get{return this.to;}set{this.to = value;}}
    private string from;
    public string From {get{return this.from;}set{this.from = value;}}
    private string subject;
    public string Subject {get{return this.subject;}set{this.subject = value;}}
    private string body;
    public string Body {get{return this.body;}set{this.body = value;}}

    public EMail()
    {}
    public EMail(string _server, string _to, string _from, string _subject, string _body)
    {
        this.Server = _server;
        this.To = _to;
        this.From = _from;
        this.Subject = _subject;
        this.Body = _body;
    }   

    public void Send()
    {
        using(System.Net.Mail.MailMessage message = new System.Net.Mail.MailMessage(this.From, this.To, this.Subject, this.Body))
        {        
            message.IsBodyHtml = true;
            System.Net.Mail.SmtpClient client = new System.Net.Mail.SmtpClient(this.Server);
            client.DeliveryMethod = System.Net.Mail.SmtpDeliveryMethod.Network;
            //I have tried this, but it still does not work.
            //client.ServicePoint.ConnectionLeaseTimeout = 0;
            try 
            {
                client.Send(message);
            }  
            catch(System.Exception ex) 
            {
                System.Windows.Forms.MessageBox.Show(ex.ToString());              
            }
        }
    }
}

Edit:

It turns out the email does eventually send after 2-3 minutes. It seems as though it is being queued by the exchange server, or the SmtpClient connection eventually times out and is closed by the server.

Edit:

I have tried.

client.ServicePoint.ConnectionLeaseTimeout = 1;
client.ServicePoint.MaxIdleTime = 1;
share|improve this question

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I finally; after all the help from StackOverflow and other various research sources, have found the solution. By setting System.Net.ServicePointManager.MaxServicePointIdleTime = 1, the mail is sent immediately.

Here is the final code.

public class EMail
{
    private string server;
    public string Server {get{return this.server;}set{this.server = value;}}
    private string to;
    public string To {get{return this.to;}set{this.to = value;}}
    private string from;
    public string From {get{return this.from;}set{this.from = value;}}
    private string subject;
    public string Subject {get{return this.subject;}set{this.subject = value;}}
    private string body;
    public string Body {get{return this.body;}set{this.body = value;}}

    public EMail()
    {}
    public EMail(string _server, string _to, string _from, string _subject, string _body)
    {
        this.Server = _server;
        this.To = _to;
        this.From = _from;
        this.Subject = _subject;
        this.Body = _body;
    }   

    public void Send()
    {
        using(System.Net.Mail.MailMessage message = new System.Net.Mail.MailMessage(this.From, this.To, this.Subject, this.Body))
        {        
            message.IsBodyHtml = true;
            System.Net.Mail.SmtpClient client = new System.Net.Mail.SmtpClient(this.Server);
            client.DeliveryMethod = System.Net.Mail.SmtpDeliveryMethod.Network;

            int temp = System.Net.ServicePointManager.MaxServicePointIdleTime; //<- Store the original value.
            System.Net.ServicePointManager.MaxServicePointIdleTime = 1; //<- Change the idle time to 1.

            try 
            {
                client.Send(message);
            }  
            catch(System.Exception ex) 
            {
                System.Windows.Forms.MessageBox.Show(ex.ToString());              
            }
            finally
            {
                System.Net.ServicePointManager.MaxServicePointIdleTime = temp; //<- Set the idle time back to what it was.
            }
        }
    }
}

Thank you all for your help! Especially icemanind.

share|improve this answer

A possible cause is that the connection is being kept open. Try closing the connection at the end of the Send method and see if that works.

Edit: This appears to be the case in .NET 4.0 now that the SmtpClient implements IDispose.

share|improve this answer
1  
I don't believe SMTPClient inherits IDisposable nor does it have a close connection method. So I don't think this is possible. –  Icemanind May 25 '10 at 16:01
    
SMTPClient Does not have a Dispose or Close method, despite what the documentation says. I have tried to call Dispose(), but the code will not compile. –  Tester101 May 25 '10 at 16:04
    
Yeah it will not compile because it does not implement IDisposable, meaning there is no Dispose() method. –  Icemanind May 25 '10 at 16:08
    
How annoying. I see you tried the time out trick, have you tried setting it to 1 instead of 0 and seeing if that properly closes the socket? –  Laplace May 25 '10 at 16:10
    
yes I have used 1 and a few other low values. –  Tester101 May 25 '10 at 16:12

I am betting you have Norton Antivirus installed. This seems to be a known issue with Norton Antivirus. You can fix this by opening Norton antivirus and disabling the email tools. Let me know if that works for you.

share|improve this answer
    
This is not a practical solution. –  Tester101 May 25 '10 at 16:11
    
Maybe not but it is definately the cause of this issue –  Icemanind May 25 '10 at 16:12
    
So the solution would be to tell all clients to shut off their antivirus? seems like there must be a better option. –  Tester101 May 25 '10 at 16:18
4  
I'm not saying that. All I am saying is that the code you posted works fine. From a coding standpoint, your program works! As far as norton goes, you need to find a solution to that program. That is a separate issue then this one. –  Icemanind May 25 '10 at 16:19
    
Fair enough. So the solution is to get a job with Norton and fix their code. haha. Thanks for your help. –  Tester101 May 25 '10 at 16:24

ok Tester...If you want to get around the Norton Issue, its pretty simple. Add the following line:

message.EnableSsl = true;

This will cause the smtp client to encrypt your connection, thus sending it on a different port then what norton monitors. See if that works!

share|improve this answer
    
System.Net.Mail.MailMessage does not have an EnableSsl property, but setting the SmtpClient's EnableSsl property to true reveled that the sever does not support secure connections. –  Tester101 May 25 '10 at 16:34
    
Sure is a head scratcher. Without disabling norton or using SSL, I'm not sure how this can work. But I will find a solution. Give me a few –  Icemanind May 25 '10 at 16:37
    
Is there a way to register my application with Norton or something, so it does not scan messages sent by it? –  Tester101 May 25 '10 at 16:42
    
Well that's not really the issue. What's going on is .NET 2.0 - .NET 3.5 does not implement a dispose() method. A proper dispose() method should send a QUIT command to the smtp server and this would be when Norton would send it. Microsoft fixed this with .NET 4.0. So one solution may be to upgrade your project to .NET 4.0. If this is not possible, another possibility is to use a 3rd party SMTP control. –  Icemanind May 25 '10 at 16:48
    
It turns out the message does eventually send after 2-3 minutes. Any thoughts on this behavior? –  Tester101 May 25 '10 at 16:49

Also, for any disposable types like System.Net.Mail.MailMessage you should used a "using" block:

public void Send() 
{ 
    using (System.Net.Mail.MailMessage message = new System.Net.Mail.MailMessage(this.From, this.To, this.Subject, this.Body))
    {
        message.IsBodyHtml = true; 
        System.Net.Mail.SmtpClient client = new System.Net.Mail.SmtpClient(this.Server); 
        client.DeliveryMethod = System.Net.Mail.SmtpDeliveryMethod.Network; 
        try  
        { 
            client.Send(message); 
        }   
        catch(System.Exception ex)  
        { 
            System.Windows.Forms.MessageBox.Show(ex.ToString());               
        }
    } 
} 
share|improve this answer
    
This is not production code, it was just typed up to demonstrate the problem. But yes I do use using most of the time, but this does not solve the problem in this situation. –  Tester101 May 25 '10 at 16:09

System.Net.Mail.MailMessage and System.Net.Mail.SmtpClient both implement IDisposable, which means that you need to call Dispose on them after you're done. IE:

using (System.Net.Mail.MailMessage message = new System.Net.Mail.MailMessage(this.From, this.To, this.Subject, this.Body))
{
    message.IsBodyHtml = true; 
    using(System.Net.Mail.SmtpClient client = new System.Net.Mail.SmtpClient(this.Server))
    {
        client.DeliveryMethod = System.Net.Mail.SmtpDeliveryMethod.Network; 
        try  
        { 
            client.Send(message); 
        }   
        catch(System.Exception ex)  
        { 
            System.Windows.Forms.MessageBox.Show(ex.ToString());               
        }
    }
} 
share|improve this answer
    
As mentioned before SmtpClient DOES NOT implement IDisposable –  Tester101 May 25 '10 at 16:13
    
@Tester101: Yes it does. I just made and compiled a project that calls SmtpClient.Dispose, and I verified in the metadata that IDisposable is properly implemented. Something else is going on. –  JSBձոգչ May 25 '10 at 17:22
    
Wait--the IDisposable interface wasn't added until 4... 3.5 and earlier don't have it. –  JSBձոգչ May 25 '10 at 17:30
    
So updating to version 4 would solve the problem? –  Tester101 May 25 '10 at 19:49
    
@Tester, it probably would. –  JSBձոգչ May 25 '10 at 20:00

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