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Inputs

Papaya 2
Apple 1 & 2
Orange 1, 2 & 3
Kiwi 1 - 4
Banana1-4
Breadfruit

Desired Outputs

Papaya 2
Apple 1
Apple 2
Orange 1
Orange 2
Orange 3
Kiwi 1
Kiwi 2
Kiwi 3
Kiwi 4
Banana 1
Banana 2
Banana 3
Banana 4
Breadfruit

How can I do this? My thinking is a combination of Regex to detect the presence of these differing suffices and generating the missing numbers where necessary.

The language in question is CloverETL's CTL. Using their Normalizer component to perform some data cleanup. However, I'll take any language...translation is easy.

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Not sure that I'm understanding correctly, are the only two possible strings "Foo Bar 1 & 2" or "Foo Baz 1, 2 & 3"? –  Chad Birch May 25 '10 at 16:01
    
I don't think regex is the appropriate tool for this. –  Georg Schölly May 25 '10 at 17:13
    
There are a a number of strings but they all end with "1 & 2" or "1, 2 & 3" –  Rasputin Jones May 25 '10 at 17:13
    
Modified the question Georg so we all have full context. –  Rasputin Jones May 25 '10 at 17:21
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4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The last part can be matched by (?:\d+, )*\d+ & \d+$. Though you may wanna replace the spaces with \s+. Once you have the matching string, splitting it by [,&\s]+ will give you each number.

Actually, if you use ^(\D+) ((?:\d+, )*\d+ & \d+)$, matching should return a list like ["the first part", "the numbers"]. So you get everything. Split the second string, and there ya go.

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Note: this answer is based on an older revision of the question

In Java, I think something like this is what you want:

    String[] tests = {
        "One Two 1 & 2",
        "Boeing 737 2, 4 & 6",
        "Lucky 7",
        "MI6 agent 007, 006",
        "2010-05 26, 27 & 28"
    };
    for (String test : tests) {
        String[] parts = test.split("(?=\\d+(, \\d+)*( & \\d+)?$)", 2);
        for (String number : parts[1].split("\\D+")) {
            System.out.println(parts[0] + number);
        }
    }

This prints: (as seen on ideone.com)

One Two 1
One Two 2
Boeing 737 2
Boeing 737 4
Boeing 737 6
Lucky 7
MI6 agent 007
MI6 agent 006
2010-05 26
2010-05 27
2010-05 28

Essentially we use lookahead to split where the special number sequence begins, limiting the split into 2 parts. The special number sequence is then split on any sequence of non-digits \D+.

The pattern for the special number sequence, as shown in the lookahead, is:

\d+(, \d+)*( & \d+)?$

API references

  • String[] split(String regex, int limit)
    • The limit parameter controls the number of times the pattern is applied and therefore affects the length of the resulting array. If the limit n is greater than zero then the pattern will be applied at most n - 1 times, the array's length will be no greater than n, and the array's last entry will contain all input beyond the last matched delimiter.

See also


A single replaceAll solution

If, for whatever reason, you insist on doing this in one swooping replaceAll, you can write something like this:

String[] tests = {
    "One Two 1 & 2",
    "Boeing 737 2, 4 & 6",
    "Lucky 7",
    "MI6 agent 007, 006",
    "2010-05 26, 27 & 28",
};
String sequence = "\\d+(?:, \\d+)*(?: & \\d+)?$";
for (String test : tests) {         
    System.out.println(
        test.replaceAll(
            "^.*?(?=sequence)|(?<=(?=(.*?)(?=sequence))^.*)(\\d+)(\\D+)?"
                .replace("sequence", sequence),
            "$1$2$3"
        )
    );
}

The output (as seen on on ideone.com):

One Two 1 & One Two 2
Boeing 737 2, Boeing 737 4 & Boeing 737 6
Lucky 7
MI6 agent 007, MI6 agent 006
2010-05 26, 2010-05 27 & 2010-05 28

This uses triple-nested assertions, including the infinite-length lookbehind feabug in Java. I wouldn't recommend using it, but there it is.

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I'l write in Perl since you didn't specify which flavor of RegEx

It sounds like what you want may be (assuming no numbers in Foo Bar):

/(\D+)(\d+)(, \d+)*( & \d+)/;

Then $1 will be "Foo Bar" $2, $3 ... will be the individual #s, prepended by ", " or " & " so you will need to strip those from each #.

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Look at the design of Parse::Range on CPAN:

http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/PERLER/Parse-Range-0.96/lib/Parse/Range.pm

You may need to tweak the logic a little bit to support the ampersands.

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