Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Do you have any horror stories to tell? The GCC Manual recently added a warning regarding -fstrict-aliasing and casting a pointer through a union:

[...] Taking the address, casting the resulting pointer and dereferencing the result has undefined behavior [emphasis added], even if the cast uses a union type, e.g.:

    union a_union {
        int i;
        double d;
    };

    int f() {
        double d = 3.0;
        return ((union a_union *)&d)->i;
    }

Does anyone have an example to illustrate this undefined behavior?

Note this question is not about what the C99 standard says, or does not say. It is about the actual functioning of gcc, and other existing compilers, today.

I am only guessing, but one potential problem may lie in the setting of d to 3.0. Because d is a temporary variable which is never directly read, and which is never read via a 'somewhat-compatible' pointer, the compiler may not bother to set it. And then f() will return some garbage from the stack.

My simple, naive, attempt fails. For example:

#include <stdio.h>

union a_union {
    int i;
    double d;
};

int f1(void) {
    union a_union t;
    t.d = 3333333.0;
    return t.i; // gcc manual: 'type-punning is allowed, provided...' (C90 6.3.2.3)
}

int f2(void) {
    double d = 3333333.0;
    return ((union a_union *)&d)->i; // gcc manual: 'undefined behavior' 
}

int main(void) {
    printf("%d\n", f1());
    printf("%d\n", f2());
    return 0;
}

works fine, giving on CYGWIN:

-2147483648
-2147483648

Looking at the assembler, we see that gcc completely optimizes t away: f1() simply stores the pre-calculated answer:

movl    $-2147483648, %eax

while f2() pushes 3333333.0 onto the floating-point stack, and then extracts the return value:

flds   LC0                 # LC0: 1246458708 (= 3333333.0) (--> 80 bits)
fstpl  -8(%ebp)            # save in d (64 bits)
movl   -8(%ebp), %eax      # return value (32 bits)

And the functions are also inlined (which seems to be the cause of some subtle strict-aliasing bugs) but that is not relevant here. (And this assembler is not that relevant, but it adds corroborative detail.)

Also note that taking addresses is obviously wrong (or right, if you are trying to illustrate undefined behavior). For example, just as we know this is wrong:

extern void foo(int *, double *);
union a_union t;
t.d = 3.0;
foo(&t.i, &t.d); // undefined behavior

we likewise know this is wrong:

extern void foo(int *, double *);
double d = 3.0;
foo(&((union a_union *)&d)->i, &d); // undefined behavior

For background discussion about this, see for example:

http://www.open-std.org/jtc1/sc22/wg14/www/docs/n1422.pdf
http://gcc.gnu.org/ml/gcc/2010-01/msg00013.html
http://davmac.wordpress.com/2010/02/26/c99-revisited/
http://cellperformance.beyond3d.com/articles/2006/06/understanding-strict-aliasing.html
http://stackoverflow.com/questions/98650/what-is-the-strict-aliasing-rule
http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2771023/c99-strict-aliasing-rules-in-c-gcc/2771041#2771041

In the first link, draft minutes of an ISO meeting seven months ago, one participant notes in section 4.16:

Is there anybody that thinks the rules are clear enough? No one is really able to interpret them.

Other notes: My test was with gcc 4.3.4, with -O2; options -O2 and -O3 imply -fstrict-aliasing. The example from the GCC Manual assumes sizeof(double) >= sizeof(int); it doesn't matter if they are unequal.

Also, as noted by Mike Acton in the cellperformace link, -Wstrict-aliasing=2, but not =3, produces warning: dereferencing type-punned pointer might break strict-aliasing rules for the example here.

share|improve this question
1  
What optimization level did you compile at? The higher the optimization level, the more likely the compiler may be to rely on the strict aliasing rule. (As an aside, that quote from the committee meeting minutes could apply to many parts of the ISO standard :-P) –  James McNellis May 25 '10 at 16:08
    
Small point: you should probably use int64_t to ensure that the integer element in the union is the same size as the double. –  Paul R May 25 '10 at 16:21
    
You might take a look at this example: stackoverflow.com/questions/1812348/a-question-about-union-in-c/… –  James McNellis May 25 '10 at 17:13
    
yes, well I guess for x86-64 that int and double are the same size. You might expect different behaviour for the 32-bit case and the 64-bit case though, which muddies the water in this particular case. –  Paul R May 25 '10 at 17:40
    
Note that the union might have a stronger alignment requirement than each of its individual members. –  Simon Richter Oct 27 '11 at 12:38

6 Answers 6

Aliasing occurs when the compiler has two different pointers to the same piece of memory. By typecasting a pointer, you're generating a new temporary pointer. If the optimizer reorders the assembly instructions for example, accessing the two pointers might give two totally different results - it might reorder a read before a write to the same address. This is why it is undefined behavior.

You are unlikely to see the problem in very simple test code, but it will appear when there's a lot going on.

I think the warning is to make clear that unions are not a special case, even though you might expect them to be.

See this Wikipedia article for more information about aliasing: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aliasing_(computing)#Conflicts_with_optimization

share|improve this answer
    
I am willing to accept a complicated example of the problem, on any commonly-used compiler. –  Joseph Quinsey May 25 '10 at 16:41

The fact that GCC is warning about unions doesn't necessarily mean that unions don't currently work. But here's a slightly less simple example than yours:

#include <stdio.h>

struct B {
    int i1;
    int i2;
};

union A {
    struct B b;
    double d;
};

int main() {
    double d = 3.0;
    #ifdef USE_UNION
        ((union A*)&d)->b.i2 += 0x80000000;
    #else
        ((int*)&d)[1] += 0x80000000;
    #endif
    printf("%g\n", d);
}

Output:

$ gcc --version
gcc (GCC) 4.3.4 20090804 (release) 1
Copyright (C) 2008 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
This is free software; see the source for copying conditions.  There is NO
warranty; not even for MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.

$ gcc -oalias alias.c -O1 -std=c99 && ./alias
-3

$ gcc -oalias alias.c -O3 -std=c99 && ./alias
3

$ gcc -oalias alias.c -O1 -std=c99 -DUSE_UNION && ./alias
-3

$ gcc -oalias alias.c -O3 -std=c99 -DUSE_UNION && ./alias
-3

So on GCC 4.3.4, the union "saves the day" (assuming I want the output "-3"). It disables the optimisation that relies on strict aliasing and that results in the output "3" in the second case (only). With -Wall, USE_UNION also disables the type-pun warning.

I don't have gcc 4.4 to test, but please give this code a go. Your code in effect tests whether the memory for d is initialised before reading back through a union: mine tests whether it is modified.

Btw, the safe way to read half of a double as an int is:

double d = 3;
int i;
memcpy(&i, &d, sizeof i);
return i;

With optimisation on GCC, this results in:

    int thing() {
401130:       55                      push   %ebp
401131:       89 e5                   mov    %esp,%ebp
401133:       83 ec 10                sub    $0x10,%esp
        double d = 3;
401136:       d9 05 a8 20 40 00       flds   0x4020a8
40113c:       dd 5d f0                fstpl  -0x10(%ebp)
        int i;
        memcpy(&i, &d, sizeof i);
40113f:       8b 45 f0                mov    -0x10(%ebp),%eax
        return i;
    }
401142:       c9                      leave
401143:       c3                      ret

So there's no actual call to memcpy. If you aren't doing this, you deserve what you get if union casts stop working in GCC ;-)

share|improve this answer
    
The whole point of the question is that the GCC Manual states unions will not always "save the day". But every test seems to show, like yours, that they in fact do work fine. Excluding, of course, the example flagged INVALID in the cellperformance link. –  Joseph Quinsey Jun 2 '10 at 21:08
    
The manual (at least, the bit you quote) states that the code has undefined behavior. This does not rule out unions disabling strict aliasing assumptions. So it is possible that unions do always "save the day", and GCC includes the extra caveats merely to educate users, and prepare them for some future change. Which may or may not ever happen. I guess an expert on GCC optimisation could construct a failure case from first principles if there is one, otherwise it's random search. –  Steve Jessop Jun 2 '10 at 23:48
    
Agreed! I am not an expert on gcc, which is why I am asking SO. –  Joseph Quinsey Jun 3 '10 at 0:52

Have you seen this ? http://stackoverflow.com/questions/98650/what-is-the-strict-aliasing-rule

The link contains a secondary link to this article with gcc examples. http://cellperformance.beyond3d.com/articles/2006/06/understanding-strict-aliasing.html

Trying a union like this would be closer to the problem.

union a_union {
    int i;
    double *d;
};

That way you have 2 types, an int and a double* pointing to the same memory. In this case using the double (*(double*)&i) could cause the problem.

share|improve this answer
    
1) The question made two references to Mike Acton's extensive and quite informative article in the cellperformace link. Note, however, one of the other links disagreed with him. –  Joseph Quinsey Jun 2 '10 at 0:19
    
2) Paul R already noted that in the real world sizeof(double) is often larger than sizeof(int). But this irrelevant here, and the example anyway came from the GCC Manual. –  Joseph Quinsey Jun 2 '10 at 0:26

Your assertion that the following code is "wrong":

extern void foo(int *, double *);
union a_union t;
t.d = 3.0;
foo(&t.i, &t.d); // undefined behavior

... is wrong. Just passing taking the address of the two union members and passing them to an external function doesn't result in undefined behaviour; you only get that from dereferencing one of those pointers in an invalid way. For instance if the function foo returns immediately without dereferencing the pointers you passed it, then the behaviour is not undefined. With a strict reading of the C99 standard, there are even some cases where the pointers can be dereferenced without invoking undefined behaviour; for instance, it could read the value referenced by the second pointer, and then store a value through the first pointer.

share|improve this answer
    
@davmac--You are right. I need to actually define a sample function. Perhaps void f(int *i, double *d){*i = 1; *d = 2;}? The two statements can be executed in either order, by strict-aliasing. But (I am guessing) if one added __attribute__((may_alias)) to the parameters, the statements would be executed as written. –  Joseph Quinsey Aug 2 '11 at 1:21
    
@Joseph, strict-aliasing doesn't allow the stores to be executed in either order, because a store is allowed to change an object's effective type (C99 6.5p7). It does allow reads to be re-ordered with respect to stores that aren't allowed to alias them. A better sample would be int f(int *i, double *d) {*i = 1; *d = 2; return *i} –  davmac Aug 2 '11 at 7:35
    
Ah, sorry, what I wrote doesn't quite make sense in this case seeing as we are talking about a union object with a declared type. However, basically you're storing to one union member and then to another; I think this is still allowed by the standard (even though you're doing it through pointers, not through the union type). Although admittedly the standard starts to make very little sense if you examine it too deeply. Recent C99 amendments (TC 3 I think) seem to allow storing to one union member and then reading another, but the value is then unspecified. –  davmac Aug 2 '11 at 7:42
1  
Technical Corrigendum 3 for C99 N1265 adds footnote 82: 'If the member used to access the contents of a union object is not the same as the member last used to store a value in the object, the appropriate part of the object representation of the value is reinterpreted as an object representation in the new type as described in 6.2.6 (a process sometimes called "type punning"). This might be a trap representation.' –  Joseph Quinsey Aug 3 '11 at 19:16
1  
And I believe f is "wrong', to use the words from TC3 6.5.2.3 Example 3, "because the union type is not visible within function f". –  Joseph Quinsey Aug 3 '11 at 19:25

Well it's a bit of necro-posting, but here is a horror story. I'm porting a program that was written with the assumption that the native byte order is big endian. Now I need it to work on little endian too. Unfortunately, I can't just use native byte order everywhere, as data could be accessed in many ways. For example, a 64-bit integer could be treated as two 32-bit integers or as 4 16-bit integers, or even as 16 4-bit integers. To make things worse, there is no way to figure out what exactly is stored in memory, because the software is an interpreter for some sort of byte code, and the data is formed by that byte code. For example, the byte code may contain instructions to write an array of 16-bit integers, and then access a pair of them as a 32-bit float. And there is no way to predict it or alter the byte code.

Therefore, I had to create a set of wrapper classes to work with values stored in the big endian order regardless of the native endianness. Worked perfectly in Visual Studio and in GCC on Linux with no optimizations. But with gcc -O2, hell broke loose. After a lot of debugging I figured out that the reason was here:

double D;
float F; 
Ul *pF=(Ul*)&F; // Ul is unsigned long
*pF=pop0->lu.r(); // r() returns Ul
D=(double)F; 

This code was used to convert a 32-bit representation of a float stored in a 32-bit integer to double. It seems that the compiler decided to do the assignment to *pF after the assignment to D - the result was that the first time the code was executed, the value of D was garbage, and the consequent values were "late" by 1 iteration.

Miraculously, there were no other problems at that point. So I decided to move on and test my new code on the original platform, HP-UX on a RISC processor with native big endian order. Now it broke again, this time in my new class:

typedef unsigned long long Ur; // 64-bit uint
typedef unsigned char Uc;
class BEDoubleRef {
        double *p;
public:
        inline BEDoubleRef(double *p): p(p) {}
        inline operator double() {
                Uc *pu = reinterpret_cast<Uc*>(p);
                Ur n = (pu[7] & 0xFFULL) | ((pu[6] & 0xFFULL) << 8)
                        | ((pu[5] & 0xFFULL) << 16) | ((pu[4] & 0xFFULL) << 24)
                        | ((pu[3] & 0xFFULL) << 32) | ((pu[2] & 0xFFULL) << 40)
                        | ((pu[1] & 0xFFULL) << 48) | ((pu[0] & 0xFFULL) << 56);
                return *reinterpret_cast<double*>(&n);
        }
        inline BEDoubleRef &operator=(const double &d) {
                Uc *pc = reinterpret_cast<Uc*>(p);
                const Ur *pu = reinterpret_cast<const Ur*>(&d);
                pc[0] = (*pu >> 56) & 0xFFu;
                pc[1] = (*pu >> 48) & 0xFFu;
                pc[2] = (*pu >> 40) & 0xFFu;
                pc[3] = (*pu >> 32) & 0xFFu;
                pc[4] = (*pu >> 24) & 0xFFu;
                pc[5] = (*pu >> 16) & 0xFFu;
                pc[6] = (*pu >> 8) & 0xFFu;
                pc[7] = *pu & 0xFFu;
                return *this;
        }
        inline BEDoubleRef &operator=(const BEDoubleRef &d) {
                *p = *d.p;
                return *this;
        }
};

For some really weird reason, the first assignment operator only correctly assigned bytes 1 through 7. Byte 0 always had some nonsense in it, which broke everything as there is a sign bit and a part of order.

I have tried to use unions as a workaround:

union {
    double d;
    Uc c[8];
} un;
Uc *pc = un.c;
const Ur *pu = reinterpret_cast<const Ur*>(&d);
pc[0] = (*pu >> 56) & 0xFFu;
pc[1] = (*pu >> 48) & 0xFFu;
pc[2] = (*pu >> 40) & 0xFFu;
pc[3] = (*pu >> 32) & 0xFFu;
pc[4] = (*pu >> 24) & 0xFFu;
pc[5] = (*pu >> 16) & 0xFFu;
pc[6] = (*pu >> 8) & 0xFFu;
pc[7] = *pu & 0xFFu;
*p = un.d;

but it didn't work either. In fact, it was a bit better - it only failed for negative numbers.

At this point I'm thinking about adding a simple test for native endianness, then doing everything via char* pointers with if (LITTLE_ENDIAN) checks around. To make things worse, the program makes heavy use of unions all around, which seems to work ok for now, but after all this mess I won't be surprised if it suddenly breaks for no apparent reason.

share|improve this answer
    
Teensy bit after the fact, but you could try compiling with -fno-strict-aliasing which will allow those pointer shenanigans at the (potential) cost of some performance. –  user2472093 Aug 12 at 11:20
    
@user2472093, and have it bite me later on some other compiler? No, thank you. In fact, I think I already had it. Something about breaking on MSVC in release configuration. The worst thing is, it broke only on one particular value out of hundreds, and that particular value had only one bit wrong. But that bit was in the order part, so the result was completely different. –  Sergey Tachenov Aug 13 at 15:31

I don't really understand your problem. The compiler did exactly what it was supposed to do in your example. The union conversion is what you did in f1. In f2 it's a normal pointer typecast, that you casted it to a union is irrelevant, it's still a pointer casting

share|improve this answer
    
1) I am looking for the wrong way to do something. –  Joseph Quinsey Jun 2 '10 at 0:13
    
2) The link to AndreyT's answer seems to imply gcc is right, and the rest of the world is wrong. But that is not the question. I am looking for horror stories. Or even a tiny example. –  Joseph Quinsey Jun 2 '10 at 0:49
    
Ok. Did you follow up on the davmac.wordpress.com/2010/02/26/c99-revisited blog entry? Especially the davmac.wordpress.com/2009/10/25/… where he found an aliasing bug in MySQL. This might be what you're looking for. –  tristopia Jun 2 '10 at 7:27
    
@tristopia: My question is very narrow, about union punning through a pointer. I've just asked a more general question in stackoverflow.com/questions/2958633/…. –  Joseph Quinsey Jun 2 '10 at 14:36

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.