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I have a query regarding how delegates work. My understanding was that delegates take responsibility for doing certain tasks on behalf of another object.

locationManager = [[CLLocationManager alloc] init]; 
[locationManager setDelegate:self];
[locationManager setDistanceFilter:kCLDistanceFilterNone];
[locationManager setDesiredAccuracy:kCLLocationAccuracyBest];
[locationManager startUpdatingLocation];

Am I right in thinking that in the example code above that the instance of CLLocationManager is created on a new thread so that it can get on with trying to find the location information it needs. When it completes its task (or encounters an error) it calls-back using the appropriate methods located in self e.g.

locationManager:didUpdateToLocation:fromLocation:

Essentially locationManager sends messages to self (which conforms to the correct delegate protocol) when things happen

cheers gary

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up vote 6 down vote accepted

That is mostly correct.

the instance of CLLocationManager is created on a new thread

No, the instance is created on the thread you call it from. You posted no threading-related code. Of course the Location Manager avoids blocking the thread while working. This may be using a background thread internally, but you don't know or care.

locationManager sends messages to self (which conforms to the correct delegate protocol) when things happen

Yes.

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Just to emphasize the point: Instead of a background thread, the location manager could also just have a polling timer, or register for a callback. –  Chuck May 25 '10 at 18:07
    
thank you, I was just curious as particularly with CLLocationManager once you set it going it goes off and does its own thing. I guess however its really just waiting for the iPhone hardware to work out where the device is so its not really doing a whole load of processing itself. –  fuzzygoat May 25 '10 at 19:33
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