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I have ported the code inside java.util.Random class in objectivec. I want to have an identical random number generator so that it synchs with the server app running on java. Now is this a safe porting and if not is there a way to mimic AtomicLong as it is found in java? Please see my code below.

static long long multiplier = 0x5DEECE66DL;
static long addend = 0xBL;
static long long mask = (0x1000000000000001L << 48) - 1;


-(void) initWithSeed:(long long) seed1 {
    [self setRandomSeed: 0L];// = new AtomicLong(0L);
    [self setSeed: seed1];
}

-(int) next:(int)bits {
    long long oldseed, nextseed;
    long long seed1 = [self.randomSeed longLongValue]; //AtomicLong
    //do {
        oldseed = seed1;
        nextseed = (oldseed * multiplier + addend) & mask;
    //} while (!seed.compareAndSet(oldseed, nextseed));
    [self setRandomSeed: [NSNumber numberWithLongLong:nextseed]];

    ///int ret = (int)(nextseed >>> (48 - bits));
    int ret = (unsigned int)(nextseed >> (48 - bits));
    return ret;
}
-(void) setSeed:(long long) seed1 {
    seed1 = (seed1 ^ multiplier) & mask;
    [self setRandomSeed: [NSNumber numberWithLongLong:seed1]];
}
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Sidenote: Why not make the static variables const? – Georg Fritzsche May 26 '10 at 0:14
1  
AtomicLong is a long with atomic behavior. This allows you to do things like getAndIncrement() from multiple threads without running into bad data problems. (If it were just working off of count++; return count;, for example, it is possible that two different threads would see the same result from different calls, even though you meant for it to be unique.) – Mike May 26 '10 at 0:16
2  
I'm not sure that reproducing exactly the AtomicLong's behavior makes sense for what you want to do but wouldn't one way to do it be simply to write your own AtomicLong equivalent class in Objective-C using Objective-C's @synchronized() directive? (why I'm not sure it makes lots of sense is that anyway you won't be able to schedule threads of execution to execute exactly in the same order... All you can guarantee is that numbers are generated in the same order, but you can't reproduce with thread will be calling Random when...) – SyntaxT3rr0r May 26 '10 at 1:54
    
Thanks for the comments. For now my code will run on single thread hence the use of @synchronized directive may not be a good idea. However since I would call this class instance methods only a few(100s) times, performance may not be that important here. So to keep it safe for the future use in threads, I think I am going to use @synchronized directive. – dipu May 26 '10 at 17:18
up vote 1 down vote accepted

If your objective is to make the generation of these numbers thread safe, the answer is it doesn't work as currently written. If two threads enter the next: method at the same time, they may both get the same value of the seed and both return the same value.

What I would do is forget about wrapping the number in a NSNumber object and just put the code in next: and setSeed: in @synchronised blocks

// randomSeed is a long long ivar 

-(void) setSeed:(long long) seed1 
{
    @synchronized(self)
    {
        randomSeed = (seed1 ^ multiplier) & mask;
    }
}

-(int) next:(int)bits 
{
    int ret;
    @synchronized(self)
    {
        long long oldseed, nextseed;
        long long seed1 = randomSeed;
        //do {
                 oldseed = seed1;
                 nextseed = (oldseed * multiplier + addend) & mask;
        //} while (!seed.compareAndSet(oldseed, nextseed)); /* you won't need to do this atomically */
        randomSeed = nextSeed;
        ///ret = (int)(nextseed >>> (48 - bits));
        ret = (unsigned int)(nextseed >> (48 - bits));
    }

    return ret;
}

I can't comment on whether your algorithm is right or not.

However, your init method needs to call [super init] like so:

-(id) init
{
    self = [super init];
    if (self != nil)
    {
        // init stuff
    }
    return self;
}
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If you search for atomic manipulation, then there are the OSAtomic collection of functions. These functions allow various operation on 32 and 64 bits integer.

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