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Is “long x = 1/2” equal to 1 or 0, and why?
C# and Java : 3 / 2 * 3.2 = 3.2, why??

Hello,

I'm astonished. I'm trying this simple calculation in a Java application:

System.out.println("b=" + (1 - 7/10));

Obviously I want "b=0.3" for the output but here's what I get:

b=1

What?! Why does this happens?

If I make:

System.out.println("b=" + (1-0.7));

I get the right result which is "b=0.3".

What's going wrong here?

Thanks!

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marked as duplicate by Nate, polygenelubricants, starblue, Matthew Flaschen, Graviton May 27 '10 at 7:00

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 30 down vote accepted

You're using integer division.

Try 7.0/10 instead.

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14  
I'll add that this is not a bug. It's a feature. :] –  Xavier Ho May 26 '10 at 0:35
    
Thanks a lot! That solved the problem. Ok I added "feature" in the title of my question :) Thanks once again! –  msr May 26 '10 at 0:44
    
@msr: No worries. Feel free to "tick" one of the answers you feel appropriate! –  Xavier Ho May 26 '10 at 0:54
5  
neither bug nor feature - it is "working as designed". –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen May 26 '10 at 6:23
    
If you are working with variables, you can just cast any of them to float. a = 1; b = 2; a / b = 0; (float)a / b = 0.5; a / (float)b = 0.5; –  Azee Jun 10 at 13:06
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You've used integers in the expression 7/10, and integer 7 divided by integer 10 is zero.

What you're expecting is floating point division. Any of the following would evaluate the way you expected:

7.0 / 10
7 / 10.0
7.0 / 10.0
7 / (double) 10
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Please do not take this as an answer to the question. It is not, but an advice related to exploiting the difference of int and float. I would have put this under a comment except that the answer box allows me to format this comment.

This feature has been used in every respectable programming language since the days of fortran (or earlier) - I must confess I was once a Fortran and Cobol punch card programmer.

As an example, integer division of 10/3 yields integer value 3 since an integer has no facility to hold fractional residual .3333.. .

One of the ways we (old time ancient programmers) had been using this feature is loop control.

Let's say we wish to print an array of 1000 strings, but we wish to insert a line break after every 15th string, to insert some prettyfying chars at the end of the line and at the beginning of the next line. We exploit this, given that integer k is the position of a string in that array.

int(k/15)*15 == k

is true only when k is divisible by 15, an occurrence at a frequency of every 15th cell. Which is akin to what my friend said about his grandfather's dead watch being accurate twice a day.

int(1/15) = 0 -> int(1/15)*15 = 0
int(2/15) = 0 -> int(2/15)*15 = 0
...
int(14/15) = 0 -> int(14/15)*15 = 0
int(15/15) = 1 -> int(15/15)*15 = 15

int(16/15) = 1 -> int(16/15)*15 = 15
int(17/15) = 1 -> int(17/15)*15 = 15
...
int(29/15) = 1 -> int(29/15)*15 = 15
int(30/15) = 2 -> int(30/15)*15 = 30

Therefore, the loop,

leftPrettyfy();
for(int k=0; k<sa.length; k++){
  print(sa[k]);
  int z = k + 1;
  if ((z/15)*15 == z){
    rightPrettyfy();
    leftPrettyfy();
  }
}

By varying k in a fanciful way in the loop, we could print a triangular printout

1
2  3
4  5  6
7  8  9  10
11 12 13 14 15

That is to demonstrate that, if you consider this a bug, this "bug" is a useful feature that we would not want to be removed from any of the various languages that we have used thus far.

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3  
Is something wrong with k % 15 == 0? –  Corey May 26 '10 at 6:16
    
Since mod (a,x) = a - (x * int(a/x)), I think the answer lies in that besides burden of constructing an argument stack repeatedly plus a code jmp to call a modulo subroutine, you can count that the inlined a == (x * int(a/x)) is one operation more efficient than a - (x * int(a/x)) == 0. –  Blessed Geek May 26 '10 at 6:44
    
I wrote "By varying k in a fanciful way in the loop, we could print a triangular printout", for k==(k/L)*L. It should have been - "By varying L in a fanciful way in the loop, we could print a triangular printout." –  Blessed Geek May 26 '10 at 19:11
    
FWIW, I tested this on my box (mid-2011 2.8 GHz i7 Linux desktop running JDK 1.6.0_38), and for a = 1 .. 500 million, over 10 repetitions, (a % 15 == 0) averages about 1500ms, vs about 1400ms for (a == 15 * (a / 15)). So unless and until you've proved that % is your hot spot, on modern hardware, I think you're better off writing what you mean. –  David Moles May 10 '13 at 19:34
    
"unless and until"?? We should ban VB, javascript and perl programming. –  Blessed Geek May 10 '13 at 22:36
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I find letter identifiers to be more readable and more indicative of parsed type:

1 - 7f / 10
1 - 7 / 10f

or:

1 - 7d / 10
1 - 7 / 10d
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