Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'd like to do a Regex.Split on some separators but I'd like to keep the separators. To give an example of what I'm trying:

"abc[s1]def[s2][s3]ghi" --> "abc", "[s1]", "def", "[s2]", "[s3]", "ghi"

The regular expression I've come up with is new Regex("\\[|\\]|\\]\\["). However, this gives me the following:

"abc[s1]def[s2][s3]ghi" --> "abc", "s1", "def", "s2", "", "s3", "ghi"

The separators have disappeared (which makes sense given my regex). Is there a way to write the regex so that the separators themselves are preserved?

share|improve this question
up vote 10 down vote accepted

Use zero-length maching lookarounds; you want to split on

(?=\[)|(?<=\])

That is, anywhere where we assert a match of a literal [ ahead, or where we assert a match of literal ] behind.

As a C# string literal, this is

@"(?=\[)|(?<=\])"

See also

Related questions


Example in Java

    System.out.println(java.util.Arrays.toString(
        "abc[s1]def[s2][s3]ghi".split("(?=\\[)|(?<=\\])")
    ));
    // prints "[abc, [s1], def, [s2], [s3], ghi]"

    System.out.println(java.util.Arrays.toString(
        "abc;def;ghi;".split("(?<=;)")
    ));
    // prints "[abc;, def;, ghi;]"

    System.out.println(java.util.Arrays.toString(
        "OhMyGod".split("(?=(?!^)[A-Z])")
    ));
    // prints "[Oh, My, God]"
share|improve this answer
    
This works, thanks. And thanks for the additional info. – Ronald Wildenberg May 26 '10 at 7:37

You could use .Matches instead of .Split, example (http://www.ideone.com/gUjRM):

string x = "abc[s1]def[s2][s3]ghi";
var r = new Regex(@"[^\[]+|\[[^\]]+\]");
var ms = r.Matches(x);
// do stuff with the MatchCollection `ms`.
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.