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If a finally block throws an exception what exactly happens?

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4  
Why not just try it? But on this sort of things, the one I like the most is return before the finally and then return something else from the finally block. :) –  ANeves May 26 '10 at 9:38
8  
All statements in a finally block must execute. It can't have a return. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/0hbbzekw(VS.80).aspx –  Tim Scarborough May 26 '10 at 12:02
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8 Answers 8

up vote 190 down vote accepted

If a finally block throws an exception what exactly happens ?

That exception propagates out and up, and will (can) be handled at a higher level.

Your finally block will not be completed beyond the point where the exception is thrown.

If the finally block was executing during the handling of another exception, then that first exception is lost.

C# 4 Language Specification § 8.9.5: If the finally block throws another exception, processing of the current exception is terminated.

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18  
+1: the only answer that fully answers the question –  David M May 26 '10 at 8:30
1  
If an exception is thrown from the try block, it will be eaten. –  Michael Damatov May 26 '10 at 8:36
5  
Unless it is a ThreadAbortException, then the whole finally block will be finished first, as it is a critical section. –  Shedal Oct 8 '13 at 21:23
1  
@Shedal - you're right but that applies only to "certain asynchronous exceptions", ie ThreadAbortException. For normal 1-thread code my answer holds. –  Henk Holterman Feb 23 at 9:28
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For questions like these I usually open up an empty console application project in Visual Studio and write a small sample program:

using System;

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        try
        {
            try
            {
                throw new Exception("exception thrown from try block");
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Inner catch block handling {0}.", ex.Message);
                throw;
            }
            finally
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Inner finally block");
                throw new Exception("exception thrown from finally block");
                Console.WriteLine("This line is never reached");
            }
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Outer catch block handling {0}.", ex.Message);
        }
        finally
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Outer finally block");
        }
    }
}

When you run the program you will see the exact order in which catch and finally blocks are executed. Please note that code in the finally block after the exception is being thrown will not be executed (in fact, in this sample program Visual Studio will even warn you that it has detected unreachable code):

Inner catch block handling exception thrown from try block.
Inner finally block
Outer catch block handling exception thrown from finally block.
Outer finally block

Additional Remark

As Michael Damatov pointed out, an exception from the try block will be "eaten" if you don't handle it in an (inner) catch block. In fact, in the example above the re-thrown exception does not appear in the outer catch block. To make that even more clear look at the following slightly modified sample:

using System;

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        try
        {
            try
            {
                throw new Exception("exception thrown from try block");
            }
            finally
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Inner finally block");
                throw new Exception("exception thrown from finally block");
                Console.WriteLine("This line is never reached");
            }
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Outer catch block handling {0}.", ex.Message);
        }
        finally
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Outer finally block");
        }
    }
}

As you can see from the output the inner exception is "lost" (i.e. ignored):

Inner finally block
Outer catch block handling exception thrown from finally block.
Outer finally block
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2  
Because you THROW the Exception in your inner catch, 'Inner finally block' will never be reached in this example –  Theofanis Pantelides May 26 '10 at 8:43
2  
@Theofanis Pantelides: No, a finally block will (almost) always be executed, this holds also in this case for the inner finally block (just try the sample program yourself (A finally block will not be executed in the case of a non-recoverable exception, e.g. an EngineExecutionException, but in such a case your program will terminate immediately anyway). –  0xA3 May 26 '10 at 8:59
5  
+1: A more useful answer than merely quoting the spec. –  Eamon Nerbonne May 26 '10 at 11:11
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The exception is propagated.

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@bitbonk: from the inside out, as usual. –  Piskvor May 26 '10 at 8:30
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If there is an exception pending (when the try block has a finally byt no catch), the new exception replaces that one.

If there is no exception pending, it works just as throwing an exception outside the finally block.

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Throwing an exception while another exception is active will result in the first exception getting replaced by the second (later) exception.

Here is some code that illustrates what happens:

    public static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        try
        {
            try
            {
                throw new Exception("first exception");
            }
            finally
            {
                //try
                {
                    throw new Exception("second exception");
                }
                //catch (Exception)
                {
                    //throw;
                }
            }
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(e);
        }
    }
  • Run the code and you will see "second exception"
  • Uncomment the try and catch statements and you will see "first exception"
  • Also uncomment the throw; statement and you will see "second exception" again.
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It's worth noting that it's possible for the cleanup of a "severe" exception which would only be caught outside a particular code block to throw an exception which is caught and handled within it. Using exception filters (available in vb.net, though not C#) it's possible to detect this condition. There's not a whole lot that code can do to "handle" it, though if one is using any sort of logging framework it's almost certainly worth logging. The C++ approach of having exceptions that occur within cleanup trigger a system meltdown is ugly, but having exceptions disappear is IMHO hideous. –  supercat Nov 30 '12 at 16:53
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Some months ago i also faced something like this,

    private  void RaiseException(String errorMessage)
    {
        throw new Exception(errorMessage);
    }

    private  void DoTaskForFinally()
    {
        RaiseException("Error for finally");
    }

    private  void DoTaskForCatch()
    {
        RaiseException("Error for catch");
    }

    private  void DoTaskForTry()
    {
        RaiseException("Error for try");
    }


        try
        {
            /*lacks the exception*/
            DoTaskForTry();
        }
        catch (Exception exception)
        {
            /*lacks the exception*/
            DoTaskForCatch();
        }
        finally
        {
            /*the result exception*/
            DoTaskForFinally();
        }

To solve such problem i made a utility class like

class ProcessHandler : Exception
{
    private enum ProcessType
    {
        Try,
        Catch,
        Finally,
    }

    private Boolean _hasException;
    private Boolean _hasTryException;
    private Boolean _hasCatchException;
    private Boolean _hasFinnallyException;

    public Boolean HasException { get { return _hasException; } }
    public Boolean HasTryException { get { return _hasTryException; } }
    public Boolean HasCatchException { get { return _hasCatchException; } }
    public Boolean HasFinnallyException { get { return _hasFinnallyException; } }
    public Dictionary<String, Exception> Exceptions { get; private set; } 

    public readonly Action TryAction;
    public readonly Action CatchAction;
    public readonly Action FinallyAction;

    public ProcessHandler(Action tryAction = null, Action catchAction = null, Action finallyAction = null)
    {

        TryAction = tryAction;
        CatchAction = catchAction;
        FinallyAction = finallyAction;

        _hasException = false;
        _hasTryException = false;
        _hasCatchException = false;
        _hasFinnallyException = false;
        Exceptions = new Dictionary<string, Exception>();
    }


    private void Invoke(Action action, ref Boolean isError, ProcessType processType)
    {
        try
        {
            action.Invoke();
        }
        catch (Exception exception)
        {
            _hasException = true;
            isError = true;
            Exceptions.Add(processType.ToString(), exception);
        }
    }

    private void InvokeTryAction()
    {
        if (TryAction == null)
        {
            return;
        }
        Invoke(TryAction, ref _hasTryException, ProcessType.Try);
    }

    private void InvokeCatchAction()
    {
        if (CatchAction == null)
        {
            return;
        }
        Invoke(TryAction, ref _hasCatchException, ProcessType.Catch);
    }

    private void InvokeFinallyAction()
    {
        if (FinallyAction == null)
        {
            return;
        }
        Invoke(TryAction, ref _hasFinnallyException, ProcessType.Finally);
    }

    public void InvokeActions()
    {
        InvokeTryAction();
        if (HasTryException)
        {
            InvokeCatchAction();
        }
        InvokeFinallyAction();

        if (HasException)
        {
            throw this;
        }
    }
}

And used like this

try
{
    ProcessHandler handler = new ProcessHandler(DoTaskForTry, DoTaskForCatch, DoTaskForFinally);
    handler.InvokeActions();
}
catch (Exception exception)
{
    var processError = exception as ProcessHandler;
    /*this exception contains all exceptions*/
    throw new Exception("Error to Process Actions", exception);
}

but if you want to use paramaters and return types that's an other story

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It throws an exception ;) You can catch that exception in some other catch clause.

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public void MyMethod()
{
   try
   {
   }
   catch{}
   finally
   {
      CodeA
   }
   CodeB
}

The way the exceptions thrown by CodeA and CodeB are handled is the same.

An exception thrown in a finally block has nothing special, treat it as the exception throw by code B.

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Could you elaborate? What do you mean with the exceptions are the same? –  0xA3 May 26 '10 at 8:36
1  
sorry see my EDIT –  Danny Chen May 26 '10 at 8:41
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