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I've got a problem, and all articles or examples i found seem to not care about it. I want to do some database actions in a transaction. What i want to do is very similar to most examples:

using (SqlConnection Conn = new SqlConnection(_ConnectionString))
{
    try
    {
        Conn.Open();
        SqlTransaction Trans = Conn.BeginTransaction();

        using (SqlCommand Com = new SqlCommand(ComText, Conn))
        {
            /* DB work */
        }
    }
    catch (Exception Ex)
    {
        Trans.Rollback();
        return -1;
    }
}

But the problem is, that the SqlTransaction Trans is declared inside the try block. So it is not accessable in the catch() block. Most examples just do Conn.Open() and Conn.BeginTransaction() before the try block. But i think thats a bit risky, since both can throw multiple exceptions.

Am I wrong, or do most people just ignore this risk? Whats the best solution to be able to rollback, if an exception happens.

Thanks in advance, Marks

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2  
P.S. are you sure you want to return -1 (an error code) instead of throwing an exception? –  Daniel Renshaw May 26 '10 at 10:42

6 Answers 6

up vote 40 down vote accepted
using (var Conn = new SqlConnection(_ConnectionString))
{
    SqlTransaction trans = null;
    try
    {
        Conn.Open();
        trans = Conn.BeginTransaction();

        using (SqlCommand Com = new SqlCommand(ComText, Conn, trans))
        {
            /* DB work */
        }
        trans.Commit();
    }
    catch (Exception Ex)
    {
        if (trans != null) trans.Rollback();
        return -1;
    }
}

or you could go even cleaner and easier and use this:

using (var Conn = new SqlConnection(_ConnectionString))
{
    try
    {
        Conn.Open();
        using (var ts = new System.Transactions.TransactionScope()) {
            using (SqlCommand Com = new SqlCommand(ComText, Conn))
            {
                /* DB work */
            }
            ts.Complete();
        }
    }
    catch (Exception Ex)
    {     
        return -1;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Is the second version really doing a rollback when a exception is thrown? Edit: OK, after reading documentation i've seen it. –  Marks May 26 '10 at 11:09
1  
In your first example, don't you need to specify that the sqlcommand is associated with the transaction? such as using (SqlCommand Com = new SqlCommand(ComText, Conn, **trans**))? Or is that unnecessary? is it implicitly associated? –  Ray Vega Mar 23 '11 at 2:25
    
Yes, thank you. With TransactionScope, you don't, but I'd omitted it from my first example. Edited accordingly. –  Dave Markle Mar 23 '11 at 12:51
1  
In the second example, I think you need to close the connection within the TransactionScope using block or you get an exception when it leaves the block saying the connection was not closed. –  NickG May 31 '13 at 12:47
    
Just wrap this line trans = Conn.BeginTransaction(); in a using statement and block and then if an exception happens before the call to commit, then Rollback() will be called for you before it gets disposed. –  CodeBlend Oct 23 '14 at 12:03

I don't like typing types and setting variables to null, so:

try
{
    using (var conn = new SqlConnection(/* connection string or whatever */))
    {
        conn.Open();

        using (var trans = conn.BeginTransaction())
        {
            try
            {
                using (var cmd = conn.CreateCommand())
                {
                    cmd.Transaction = trans;
                    /* setup command type, text */
                    /* execute command */
                }

                trans.Commit();
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                trans.Rollback();
                /* log exception and the fact that rollback succeeded */
            }
        }
    }
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
    /* log or whatever */
}

And if you wanted to switch to MySql or another provider, you'd only have to modify 1 line.

share|improve this answer

use this

using (SqlConnection Conn = new SqlConnection(_ConnectionString))
{
    SqlTransaction Trans = null;
    try
    {
        Conn.Open();
        Trans = Conn.BeginTransaction();

        using (SqlCommand Com = new SqlCommand(ComText, Conn))
        {
            /* DB work */
        }
    }
    catch (Exception Ex)
    {
        if (Trans != null)
            Trans.Rollback();
        return -1;
    }
}

BTW - You did not commit it in case of successful processing

share|improve this answer
using (SqlConnection Conn = new SqlConnection(_ConnectionString))
{
    try
    {
        Conn.Open();
        SqlTransaction Trans = Conn.BeginTransaction();

        try 
        {
            using (SqlCommand Com = new SqlCommand(ComText, Conn))
            {
                /* DB work */
            }
        }
        catch (Exception TransEx)
        {
            Trans.Rollback();
            return -1;
        }
    }
    catch (Exception Ex)
    {
        return -1;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
While there is more to code, this provides the best granularity for being able to determine why each step would be failing. However, do note that the SqlCommand has to be associated with the transaction. –  JWilliams Nov 16 '12 at 16:24

Microsoft samples, place the begin trans outside of the try/catch see this msdn link. I assume that the BeginTransaction method should either throw an exception OR begin a transaction but never both (although the documentation does not say this is impossible).

However, you may be better of using TransactionScope which manages a lot of the (not so) heavy lifting for you: this link

share|improve this answer
SqlConnection conn = null;
SqlTransaction trans = null;

try
{
   conn = new SqlConnection(_ConnectionString);
   conn.Open();
   trans = conn.BeginTransaction();
   /*
    * DB WORK
    */
   trans.Commit();
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
   if (trans != null)
   {
      trans.Rollback();
   }
   return -1;
}
finally
{
   if (conn != null)
   {
      conn.Close();
   }
}
share|improve this answer

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