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i've two arrays like

string[] a = { "a", "b", "c" };
string[] b = { "a", "b", "c" };

i need to compare the two arrays using LINQ.

the comparison should take place only if both arrays have same size.

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from x in a from y in b where x == y select x == y but its not correct... can not store in a Boolean variable –  Thorin Oakenshield May 26 '10 at 13:22
    
Does each array have unique values? When you consider two arrays to be the same? if they have the same elements? the same elements in the same order? –  Itay Karo May 26 '10 at 13:23
    
Are you looking for a single bool answer if the two are perfectly the same or are you looking for a check to see if each element is the same as its partner. –  Scott Chamberlain May 26 '10 at 13:24
    
not in same order... but two arrays should have equal size –  Thorin Oakenshield May 26 '10 at 13:24
6  
are these equals? { "a", "a", "b" } , { "a", "b", "b" } are these equals? { "a", "b", "a" } , { "a", "a", "b" } –  Itay Karo May 26 '10 at 13:26

5 Answers 5

up vote 24 down vote accepted
string[] a = { "a", "b" };
string[] b = { "a", "b" };

return (a.Length == b.Length && a.Intersect(b).Count() == a.Length);

After some performance testing:

  • Over 10,000 small strings - 5ms
  • Over 100,000 small strings - 99ms
  • Over 1,000,000 small strings - Avg. 601ms
  • Over 100,000 ~500 character strings - 190ms
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1  
but i don't think that performance is ok. intersection is not cheap operation –  Andrey May 26 '10 at 13:27
    
@Andrey - It depends on the size of the list as well. –  Kyle Rozendo May 26 '10 at 13:28
3  
Syntactically, I'd say return (a.Length == b.Length && a.Intersect(b).Count() == a.Length), but that's just me. –  ZombieSheep May 26 '10 at 13:34
    
@Zombie - Good point, edited. –  Kyle Rozendo May 26 '10 at 13:38
2  
However wont this method fail for cases where there are duplicate elements(in both arrays).The intersect operation being a set operation may only retain distinct elements.So if you compare it with Array.length the comparison may fail. –  josephj1989 May 27 '10 at 3:19

Not sure about the performance, but this seems to work.

string[] a = { "a", "b", "c" };
string[] b = { "a", "b", "c" };

bool result = a.SequenceEqual(b);
Assert.AreEqual(true, result);

However, it is not order independent so it does not fulfill the OP's requirement.

string[] a = { "a", "b", "c" };
string[] b = { "a", "c", "b" };

bool result = a.SequenceEqual(b);
Assert.AreEqual(false, result);
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1  
What do you mean, "it is order independant" ? SequenceEqual is NOT order independant. In your second code sample, it will return false –  Thomas Levesque May 26 '10 at 13:46
    
You are correct. Edited. –  Jeremy Roberts May 26 '10 at 13:47
    
Not downvoting, but this doesn't answer the question. As per the op: not in same order... but two arrays should have equal size –  Kyle Rozendo May 26 '10 at 13:49

I think this will always be an O(n log n) operation, so I'd just sort both arrays and compare them e.g. using SequenceEqual.

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if order doesn't matter or there can be duplicates, then perhaps:

public static class IEnumerableExtensions
{
    public static bool HasSameContentsAs<T>(this ICollection<T> source,
                                            ICollection<T> other)
    {
        if (source.Count != other.Count)
        {
            return false;
        }
        var s = source
            .GroupBy(x => x)
            .ToDictionary(x => x.Key, x => x.Count());
        var o = other
            .GroupBy(x => x)
            .ToDictionary(x => x.Key, x => x.Count());
        int count;
        return s.Count == o.Count &&
               s.All(x => o.TryGetValue(x.Key, out count) &&
                          count == x.Value);
    }
}

usage:

string[] a = { "a", "b", "c" };
string[] b = { "c", "a", "b" };

bool containSame = a.HasSameContentsAs(b);

some use cases:

  • different lengths (expect false)

    string[] a = { "a", "b", "c" };
    string[] b = { "b", "c" };
    
  • different order (expect true)

    string[] a = { "a", "b", "c" };
    string[] b = { "b", "c", "a" };
    

also works if the inputs can contain duplicate items, though it isn't clear from the question whether that characteristic is desired or not, consider:

  • duplicated items have same count (expect true)

    string[] a = { "a", "b", "b", "c" };
    string[] b = { "a", "b", "c", "b" };
    
  • duplicated items with different counts (expect false)

    string[] a = { "a", "b", "b", "b", "c" };
    string[] b = { "a", "b", "c", "b", "c" };
    
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If you compare their sizes first would you need to both containsAll operation? –  Scott Chamberlain May 26 '10 at 13:41
1  
@Scott, Yes. Consider a = { "a", "b", "c" }; b = { "c", "a". "a" }; same length but the unique items in b are a subset of those in a –  Handcraftsman May 27 '10 at 1:58
IDictionary<int, object> a = new Dictionary<int, object>();
IDictionary<int, object> b = new Dictionary<int, object>();
a.Add(1, "1");
a.Add(2, 2);
a.Add(3, "3");

b.Add(3, "3");
b.Add(1, "1");
b.Add(2, 2);

Console.WriteLine(a.All(i => b.Contains(i)) && b.All(i => a.Contains(i)));
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