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I have the following table...

TABLE: Accounts
  ID (int, PK, Identity)
  AccountType (int, PK)
  Username (varchar)
  Password (varchar)

I have created a composite key out of ID and AccountType columns so that people can have the same username/password but different AccountTypes.

Does this mean that for each foreign table that I try and link to I'll have to create two columns?

I’m using SQL Server 2008

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2  
Is ID something that has a meaning in the real world? If so, I would strongly suggest using an auto-generated integer as the primary key in this case. –  Syntactic May 26 '10 at 15:59

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Does this mean that for each foreign table that I try and link to I'll have to create two columns?

Yes, you will.

However, it will be better to use a separate table to store username / password and link this table to user_accounts (with a composite primary key).

I have created a composite key out of ID and AccountType columns so that people can have the same username/password but different AccountTypes.

With you current design, people with the same id but different AccountType can have different usernames and passwords.

Here's how you should make it:

CREATE TABLE t_user (id INT NOT NULL IDENTITY PRIMARY KEY, Username VARCHAR(100) NOT NULL, YouShouldAlwaysUseSaltedAndHashedPasswords VARCHAR(64) NOT NULL)

CREATE TABLE t_user_account (user_id INT NOT NULL, account_id INT NOT NULL, PRIMARY KEY (user_id, account_id), FOREIGN KEY (user_id) REFERENCES t_user (user_id))
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Thanks for your answer. I guess my question was more of a design question than anything else and your answer has clarified the issues I had. –  paulio May 27 '10 at 8:21
    
The referenced columns have to be in the same order that they key was created in. To get the correct order, right-click on the foreign key (under the keys folder when you expand the table in SSMS) and script create to clipboard. Paste. Make sure your referenced columns are in the same order as your key. –  Trevor Dec 27 '13 at 19:28

I have created a composite key out of ID and AccountType columns so that people can have the same username/password but different AccountTypes.

You don't need that!

  • put your PK on the ID column alone (it's an IDENTITY - so it's always unique) and use that to reference from child tables

  • put a UNIQUE constraint (or index) on (UserName, AccountType) - that way you prevent a user from having two accounts with the same type

There's really no point in having AccountType in your PK, in my opinion.

Use this design instead:

TABLE: Accounts
  ID                 INT IDENTITY     PRIMARY KEY
  AccountType        INT          UNIQUE CONSTRAINT(Username, AccountType)
  Username           VARCHAR      UNIQUE CONSTRAINT(Username, AccountType)
  Password           VARCHAR
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This will allow people with the same username to have different passwords for different account types. Not sure it's what the @op wanted. –  Quassnoi May 26 '10 at 16:13
    
Good answer, but what Quassnoi said. –  paulio May 27 '10 at 8:22
    
@Quassnoi,@paulio: well, having different passwords for different account types might not be such a bad idea; as a "regular" user, I use "opensesame", while as "admin", I use something stronger..... –  marc_s May 27 '10 at 9:14

Yes. To avoid this, I would make ID an int identity and make it alone the primary key and then add a new unique index on Username/AccountType.

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