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Trying to get some basic understanding of console functionalities. I am having issues so consider the following...

#include "stdafx.h"
#include<iostream>
#include<conio.h>

using namespace std;

/*
This is a template Project
*/

void MultiplicationTable(int x);

int main()
{

    int value = 0;

    printf("Please enter any number \n\n");
    getline(cin, value);

    MultiplicationTable(value);


    getchar();


    return 0;
}

I actually based this off code from http://www.cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial/basic_io/ . My IDE is not recognizing getline() so of course when I compile the application. I get an error

'getline': identifier not found

Now take a look at this code

#include "stdafx.h"
#include<iostream>
#include<conio.h>

using namespace std;

/*
This is a template Project
*/

void MultiplicationTable(int x);

int main()
{

    int value = 0;

    printf("Please enter any number \n\n");
    cin>>value;

    MultiplicationTable(value);


    getchar();


    return 0;
}

When I execute this line of code the console window opens and immediately closes. I think I a missing something about cin. I do know that it delimits spaces but I don't know what else. what should I use for input to make my life easier.

share|improve this question
    
Well, I think the reason that the first code doesn't work is because getline expects (char* s, streamsize n ), and cin is an istream object, so that's why the compiler complained. I'm not sure why the window doesn't stay open for the second code. –  Jesse J May 26 '10 at 16:56
    
Add brackets at the end of void MultiplicationTable(int x) like so void MultiplicationTable(int x){}; –  Secko May 26 '10 at 17:11

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The function getline() is declared in the string header. So, you have to add #include <string>. It is defined as istream& getline ( istream& is, string& str );, but you call it with an int instead of a string object.

About your second question:

When I execute this line of code the console window opens and immediately closes

There is probably still a '\n' character from your input in the stream, when your program reaches the function getchar() (which I assume you put there so your window doesn't close). You have to flush your stream. An easy fix is, instead of getchar(), add the line

 int c;
 while((c = getchar()) != '\n'){} 

This will flush your stream until the next line-break.

Remark: conio.h is not part of the c++ standard and obsolete.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks. I am really confused with this iostream. I have ran into previous problems where characters were still in the iostream and therefore the application did not function correctly. Is there any resources or anything you can say about how to address those types of issues ?? –  numerical25 May 26 '10 at 17:56

The getline function reads strings, not integers:

#include <string>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main() {
    string line;
    getline( cin, line );
    cout << "You entered: " << line << endl;
}
share|improve this answer
    
ok thanks. But What the cin code. why does it cut out for ?? –  numerical25 May 26 '10 at 17:06
    
@numerical You will have to rephrase that. –  anon May 26 '10 at 17:14
    
The second code I have uses the cin functionality. If you run that code in your compiler. It executes and then ends immediately. It doesnt leave me the time to input anything or do anything at that. –  numerical25 May 26 '10 at 17:49
    
@numerical I think you are asking a question regarding your IDE - which one are you using? In other words, how are you compiling and running this code? –  anon May 26 '10 at 17:56

You are exiting the program before you can view the results because (I'm guessing) you double-clicked the .exe file from inside a Windows Explorer (or the Desktop) view in order to execute. Instead, go to Start, Run, type in cmd.exe and open a command window. Navigate to where your program resides. Type in your program's name on the command line and execute. It will stay open until you intentionally close the command window.

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