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def maxVote(nLabels):
    count = {}
    maxList = []
    maxCount = 0
    for nLabel in nLabels:
        if nLabel in count:
            count[nLabel] += 1
        else:
            count[nLabel] = 1
    #Check if the count is max
        if count[nLabel] > maxCount:
            maxCount = count[nLabel]
            maxList = [nLabel,]
        elif count[nLabel]==maxCount:
            maxList.append(nLabel)
    return random.choice(maxList) 

nLabels contains a list of integers.

The above function returns the integer with highest frequency, if more than one have same frequency then a randomly selected integer from them is returned.

E.g. maxVote([1,3,4,5,5,5,3,12,11]) is 5

share|improve this question
    
As seen here: github.com/AKSHAYUBHAT/Label-Propagation/blob/… (from a comment of RandomVector's below) –  badp May 26 '10 at 17:15

6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted
import random
import collections

def maxvote(nlabels):
  cnt = collections.defaultdict(int)
  for i in nlabels:
    cnt[i] += 1
  maxv = max(cnt.itervalues())
  return random.choice([k for k,v in cnt.iteritems() if v == maxv])

print maxvote([1,3,4,5,5,5,3,3,11])
share|improve this answer
3  
Sorting is O(n log n); you just need the maximum, which is O(n) :) –  badp May 26 '10 at 17:04
    
Good call. Fixed. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams May 26 '10 at 17:06
    
Thanks it seems this is the best solution. –  RandomVector May 26 '10 at 17:16
    
dictionaries implemented with hash tables tend to run in constant time. This looks like O(n) for the first loop, then O(n) for finding the max. The random choice should remain trivially small as long as many characters don't have the same frequency. O(n) + O(n) = O(2n) ~ O(n). The original appeared to run in O(n^2). So this is an improvement. –  Jon W May 26 '10 at 17:16
1  
cnt = collections.Counter(nlabels) (py2.7) –  user97370 May 26 '10 at 17:58

In Python 3.1 or future 2.7 you'd be able to use Counter:

>>> from collections import Counter
>>> Counter([1,3,4,5,5,5,3,12,11]).most_common(1)
[(5, 3)]

If you don't have access to those versions of Python you could do:

>>> from collections import defaultdict
>>> d = defaultdict(int)
>>> for i in nLabels:
    d[i] += 1


>>> max(d, key=lambda x: d[x])
5
share|improve this answer

It appears to run in O(n) time. However there may be a bottleneck in checking if nLabel in count since this operation could also potentially run O(n) time as well, making the total efficiency O(n^2).

Using a dictionary instead of a list in this case is the only major efficiency boost I can spot.

share|improve this answer
    
count is a dict, therefore, membership check is O(1) –  SilentGhost May 26 '10 at 17:14
    
ah, I missed that. Yep, O(n) time then. –  Jon W May 26 '10 at 17:28

I'm not sure what exactly you want to optimize, but this should work:

from collections import defaultdict

def maxVote(nLabels):
   count = defaultdict(int)
   for nLabel in nLabels:
      count[nLabel] += 1
   maxCount = max(count.itervalues())
   maxList = [k for k in count if count[k] == maxCount]
   return random.choice(maxList)
share|improve this answer

Idea 1

Does the return really need to be random, or can you just return a maximum? If you just need to nondeterministically return a max frequency, you could just store a single label and remove the list logic, including

 elif count[nLabel]==maxCount:
        maxList.append(nLabel)

Idea 2

If this method is called frequently, would it be possible to only work on new data, as opposed to the entire data set? You could cache your count map and then only process new data. Assuming your data set is large and the calculations are done online, this could net huge improvements.

share|improve this answer
    
no it has to be random, it is a requirement of algorithm in which this is a most used part –  RandomVector May 26 '10 at 16:59
    
I am actually using a Map-Reduce type formalism and using multiple cores visa python multiprocessing module. Full code here github.com/AKSHAYUBHAT/Label-Propagation/blob/master/LP.py –  RandomVector May 26 '10 at 17:05
    
finding a maximum in parallel can approach O(log n) time in some cases. –  Jon W May 26 '10 at 17:17

Complete example:

#!/usr/bin/env python

def max_vote(l):
    """
    Return the element with the (or a) maximum frequency in ``l``.
    """
    unsorted = [(a, l.count(a)) for a in set(l)]
    return sorted(unsorted, key=lambda x: x[1]).pop()[0]

if __name__ == '__main__':
    votes = [1, 3, 4, 5, 5, 5, 3, 12, 11]
    print max_vote(votes)
    # => 5

Benchmarks:

#!/usr/bin/env python

import random
import collections

def max_vote_2(l):
    """
    Return the element with the (or a) maximum frequency in ``l``.
    """
    unsorted = [(a, l.count(a)) for a in set(l)]
    return sorted(unsorted, key=lambda x: x[1]).pop()[0]

def max_vote_1(nlabels):
    cnt = collections.defaultdict(int)
    for i in nlabels:
        cnt[i] += 1
        maxv = max(cnt.itervalues())
    return random.choice([k for k,v in cnt.iteritems() if v == maxv])

if __name__ == '__main__':
    from timeit import Timer
    votes = [1, 3, 4, 5, 5, 5, 3, 12, 11]
    print max_vote_1(votes)
    print max_vote_2(votes)

    t = Timer("votes = [1, 3, 4, 5, 5, 5, 3, 12, 11]; max_vote_2(votes)", \
        "from __main__ import max_vote_2")
    print 'max_vote_2', t.timeit(number=100000)

    t = Timer("votes = [1, 3, 4, 5, 5, 5, 3, 12, 11]; max_vote_1(votes)", \
        "from __main__ import max_vote_1")
    print 'max_vote_1', t.timeit(number=100000)

Yields:

5
5
max_vote_2 1.79455208778
max_vote_1 2.31705093384
share|improve this answer
    
Please let me know if this is wrong, but performing the set creation is O(n), looping through the set is ~O(n/2) depending on the number of duplicates, and counting is also O(n). Then when we make a new sorted list is O(n). O(n) + O(n/2) * O(n/2) + O(n) = O(n^2/2) –  Jon W May 26 '10 at 17:11
    
Keep in mind that O(n²/2) === O(n²) –  badp May 26 '10 at 17:19
    
mmh, and it seems to be faster than the curretly upvoted answer - please correct me if I'm wrong ... –  miku May 26 '10 at 17:23
    
right, but there is a demonstrable improvement for large data sets from O(n^2) to O(n^2/2) –  Jon W May 26 '10 at 17:24
    
ok, sorry for coming back - but on a list with 1_000_000 entries these improvements still don't show up. I mean, not that 1_000_000 would be that much, but ... –  miku May 26 '10 at 17:31

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