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The following line of code in my class constructor is throwing a StackOverflowException:

myList = new string[]{};  // myList is a property of type string[]

Why is that happening? And what's the proper way to initialize an empty array?


UPDATE: The cause was in the setter, in which I was attempting to trim all values:

set 
{
  for (int i = 0; i < myList.Length; i++)
     {
        if (myList[i] != null) myList[i] = myList[i].Trim();
     }
}
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Could you post the entirety of your constructor? It seems likely that the real cause of the problem is on a different line. –  Syntactic May 26 '10 at 17:17
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4 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

If myList is a property, did you check that the body of its setter does not recursively assign to itself instead of the backing field, as in:

private string[] _myList;

public string[] myList { 
  get { 
    return _myList; 
  }
  set { 
    _myList = value;
  }

}

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1  
+1 for recognizing the problem in this special case. Would be perfect if you wrote the correct usage of backing fields. –  Simon May 26 '10 at 17:21
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myList = new string[0]

This should create an array with 0 elements.

EDIT: I just tested new string[] {} and it works for me. Maybe the reason for your stackoverflow is elsewhere.

Can you post the rest of your method? Generally spoken, stackoverflows occur specially when performing a high number recursive method calls. Like this:

void MyMethod(int i)
{
   MyMethod(i); //!StackOverFlow!
}
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Nope, still getting StackOverflowException. –  MCS May 26 '10 at 17:13
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Your set code doesn't actually assign anything, and refers to itself. I have a feeling you're misunderstanding how properties work. You need a backing variable which the property manipulates:

private string[] _myList;

And then you need to have your set code work with that variable:

public string[] myList
{
    get
    {
        return _myList;
    }

    set 
    {
        _myList = value; // you have to assign it manually
        for (int i = 0; i < _myList.Length; i++)
        {
            if (_myList[i] != null) _myList[i] = _myList[i].Trim();
        }
    }
}

If you try and access myList, it's accessing itself, which then accesses itself, etc, leading to infinite recursion and a stack overflow.

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Tested; I can say this is the most likely cause, if not THE cause. –  BoltClock May 26 '10 at 17:30
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It appears as though what @Jonas H said is accurate, you may be recursivly modifying the Property instead of its backing field.

WRONG

private String[] _myList;
public String[] myList 
{
    get {return _myList;}
    set  
    { 
        for (int i = 0; i < myList.Length; i++) 
        { 
            if (myList[i] != null) myList[i] = myList[i].Trim(); 
        } 
    }
}

RIGHT

private String[] _myList;
public String[] myList 
{
    get {return _myList;}
    set  
    { 
        for (int i = 0; i < _myList.Length; i++) 
        { 
            if (_myList[i] != null) _myList[i] = _myList[i].Trim(); 
        } 
    }
}
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