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Forgive me if I am asking an obvious question (maybe I missed it in the docs somewhere?) but has anyone found a good way to organize their URLs in Jersey Java framework?

I mean organizing them centrally in your Java source code, so that you can be sure there are not two classes that refer to the same Url.

For example django has a really nice regex-based matching. I was thinking of doing something like an enum:

enum Urls{
    CARS  ("cars"),
    CAR_INFO ("car", "{info}");

    public Urls(String path, String args) 
    ...
}

but you can imagine that gets out of hand pretty quickly if you have urls like:

cars/1/wheels/3

where you need multiple path-ids interleaved with one another...

Any tips?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted
+550

From my experiences with Jersey, when I tried to annotate two places with the same @Path, I had compilation errors and it wouldn't run. This might not always be the case, so the following might help:

You can get an application.wadl file from your Jersey app by simply requesting it from you web resource:

$ curl http://localhost:8080/application.wadl

or if you prefixed your web services under /ws/

$ curl http://localhost:8080/ws/application.wadl

The application.wadl file is an XML file that shows you all of your resources in your running application, as well as what methods you can call on a resource. See the following resource on how this file is laid out.

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1  
Thanks for letting me know about wadl. –  drozzy May 27 '10 at 12:19
    
Looks like there really is no good way to organized URLs in jersey. In any case - thanks! –  drozzy Jun 10 '10 at 12:39

Well - I assume you have a @Path on each resource? This means you don't have to keep track of URLs across your entire application, rather just within each class - which is relatively easy if you annotate the interface.

Using enums won't work - you can only put contants into an annotation, but using a class holding final static String could work.

public class UrlConst {
  public final static RESOURCE_MY_RESOURCE="/resource";
  public final static RESOURCE_MY_RESOURCE2="/resource";
  public final static OP_GET_ALL="/";
  public final static OP_GET_BY_ID="/{id}";
}

@Path(UrlConst.RESOURCE_MY_RESOURCE)
public interface MyResource {

 @GET
 @Path(UrlConst.OP_GET_ALL)
 @Produces(MediaType.APPLICATION_XML)
 public ObjectList getAll();

 @GET
 @Path(UrlConst.OP_GET_BY_ID)
 @Produces(MediaType.APPLICATION_XML)
 public Object get(@PathParam("id") int id);

}

@Path(UrlConst.RESOURCE_MY_RESOURCE2)
public interface MyResource2 {

 @GET
 @Path(UrlConst.OP_GET_ALL)
 @Produces(MediaType.APPLICATION_XML)
 public ObjectList getAll();

 @GET
 @Path(UrlConst.OP_GET_BY_ID)
 @Produces(MediaType.APPLICATION_XML)
 public Object get(@PathParam("id") int id);

}

etc.

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Woot, thanks for letting me know about javax.ws.rs.core.MediaType constant! I was using my own :-) –  drozzy Jun 7 '10 at 17:30
    
About your answer - I see what you are saying, but it looks a bit clumsy to me. I'll think about it, thanks. –  drozzy Jun 7 '10 at 17:30

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