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I have the following loop to calculate the dates of the current week and print them out. It works, but I am swimming in the amount of date/time possibilities in Perl and want to get your opinion on whether there is a better way. Here's the code I've written:

#!/usr/bin/env perl
use warnings;
use strict;

use DateTime;

# Calculate numeric value of today and the 
# target day (Monday = 1, Sunday = 7); the
# target, in this case, is Monday, since that's
# when I want the week to start
my $today_dt = DateTime->now;
my $today = $today_dt->day_of_week;
my $target = 1;

# Create DateTime copies to act as the "bookends"
# for the date range
my ($start, $end) = ($today_dt->clone(), $today_dt->clone());

if ($today == $target)
{
  # If today is the target, "start" is already set;
  # we simply need to set the end date
  $end->add( days => 6 );
}
else
{
  # Otherwise, we calculate the Monday preceeding today
  # and the Sunday following today
  my $delta = ($target - $today + 7) % 7;
  $start->add( days => $delta - 7 );
  $end->add( days => $delta - 1 );
}

# I clone the DateTime object again because, for some reason,
# I'm wary of using $start directly...
my $cur_date = $start->clone();

while ($cur_date <= $end)
{
  my $date_ymd = $cur_date->ymd;
  print "$date_ymd\n";
  $cur_date->add( days => 1 );
}

As mentioned, this works, but is it the quickest or most efficient? I'm guessing that quickness and efficiency may not necessarily go together, but your feedback is very appreciated.

share|improve this question
up vote 13 down vote accepted

A slightly improved version of friedo's answer ...

my $start_of_week =
    DateTime->today()
            ->truncate( to => 'week' );

for ( 0..6 ) {
    print $start_of_week->clone()->add( days => $_ );
}

However, this assumes that Monday is the first day of the week. For Sunday, start with ...

my $start_of_week =
    DateTime->today()
            ->truncate( to => 'week' )
            ->subtract( days => 1 );

Either way, it's better to use the truncate method than re-implement it, as friedo did ;)

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the updated code. – ABach May 26 '10 at 21:45
    
A quick question - does that for loop create a new DateTime clone every iteration? Is that okay to do in Perl? – ABach May 26 '10 at 21:56
    
Note that the Sunday version doesn't work properly. You need to ->add(days => 1) before the ->truncate, or starting with Sunday will give you the start of the previous week. – cjm May 26 '10 at 22:24
    
Cool, I wasn't aware of truncate – friedo May 26 '10 at 22:32
    
@cjm: That's a good point. I wonder if there should be a ->truncate( to => 'locale-week' ) variant that is locale-aware. – Dave Rolsky May 27 '10 at 4:10

You can use the DateTime object to get the current day of the week as a number ( 1-7 ). Then just use that to find the current week's Monday. For example:

my $today = DateTime->now;
my $start = $today->clone;

# move $start to Monday
$start->subtract( days => ( $today->wday - 1 ) );   # Monday gives 1, so on monday we
                                                    # subtract zero. 

my $end = $start->clone->add( days => 7 );

The above is untested but the idea should work.

share|improve this answer
    
Wow, that's a lot simpler. Thanks! – ABach May 26 '10 at 20:53

Would this work:

use strict;
use warnings;
use POSIX qw<strftime>;
my ( $day, $pmon, $pyear, $wday ) = ( localtime )[3..6];
$day -= $wday - 1; # Get monday
for my $d ( map { $day + $_ } 0..6 ) { 
    print strftime( '%A, %B %d, %Y', ( 0 ) x 3, $d, $pmon, $pyear ), "\n";
}

I'm printing them only as an illustration. You could store them as timestamps, like this:

use POSIX qw<mktime>;
my @week = map { mktime(( 0 ) x 3, $day + $_, $pmon, $pyear ) } 0..6;
share|improve this answer
    
you are right. Sorry. – Snake Plissken May 28 '10 at 3:02
    
@Snake Plissken: No prob. Cool name. :) – Axeman May 28 '10 at 3:59
    
Thanks Axeman, your code is Working on perl v5.8.8 without DateTime module installed. This is great. I can't install any module on my prod server. – Gary Mar 28 at 14:19

This should work:

use POSIX; # for strftime
my $time = time ();
my $seconds = 24*60*60;
my @time = gmtime ();
$time = $time - $time[6] * $seconds;
for my $wday (0..6) {
    $time += $seconds;
    my @wday = gmtime ($time);
    print strftime ("%A %d %B %Y\n", @wday);
}

Gives me:

$ ./week.pl 
Monday 24 May 2010
Tuesday 25 May 2010
Wednesday 26 May 2010
Thursday 27 May 2010
Friday 28 May 2010
Saturday 29 May 2010
Sunday 30 May 2010

If you want to get weeks starting on Sunday, change $time[6] to ($time[6] + 1).

This assumes you want the GMT weeks. Change gmtime to localtime to get local time zone weeks.

share|improve this answer
1  
If you're only using POSIX for strftime (which is indeed a fine reason to use it) then it would be better to say: use POSIX qw(strftime); Also, %F gives the YYYY-MM-DD format the original poster was after. – Grant McLean May 27 '10 at 5:22
    
Thanks. There are lots of other nits to pick in that code (what does $wday do?), but basically I wanted to offer an example of doing it without DateTime, which isn't necessary for this task. – Snake Plissken May 27 '10 at 5:36

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