Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to concatenate two fields from a list to display in a dropdown. Below is the code i am trying to use. I don't want to change the model of my products so I was trying to do something like that below but I can't figure anything out without building out my own object with the fields concatenated.

            skuDropDown.DataSource = List<product>
            skuDropDown.DataTextField = "ProductId" // want to combine with"Description";
            skuDropDown.DataValueField = "ProductId";
            skuDropDown.DataBind();

Thanks any ideas will help.

share|improve this question
    
I'm afraid you have no other option but extend the domain –  Claudio Redi May 26 '10 at 20:34
add comment

6 Answers 6

up vote 18 down vote accepted

To assign the source with your given method, I would go for using LINQ to create an anonymous type with the properties you want. Something like

List<Product> products = new List<Product>();
products.Add(new Product() { ProductId = 1, Description = "Foo" });
products.Add(new Product() { ProductId = 2, Description = "Bar" });

var productQuery = products.Select(p => new { ProductId = p.ProductId, DisplayText = p.ProductId.ToString() + " " + p.Description });

skuDropDown.DataSource = productQuery;
skuDropDown.DataValueField = "ProductId";
skuDropDown.DataTextField = "DisplayText";
skuDropDown.DataBind();
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this worked liked a charm once i .tolisted it –  Locke12 May 26 '10 at 21:29
add comment

IF you have a class to represent a product, just create a property that extend your class and return it combined, for example:

        public string ID_Description {
            get 
            {
               return string.Format("{0} ({1})", Name, ProductId);
            }
        }

and, in your databind dropdown reference your property

skuDropDown.DataSource = productQuery;     
skuDropDown.DataValueField = "ProductId";     
skuDropDown.DataTextField = "ID_Description";     
skuDropDown.DataBind(); 
share|improve this answer
add comment

You can do this:

List<Product>.ForEach(
  x => skuDropDown.Items.Add(
    new Item(x.ProductId + " " x.ProductDescription, x.ProductId)
 );

Just loop through the list and add each item to the drop down list. It's what .net will do for you behind the scenes in your example.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Create a new class which extends the product, cast the List contents as the extended class, which contains a new property, which returns the concatenated values of ProductID and Description.

I think that should work OTOMH.

I know that you don't want to change the products structure, which is why I suggested making an extended class. But afaik it's not possible without binding it to a field of the object.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Unfortunately, if you're using databinding, the DataTextField must be the name of a field on your data source.

One thing you can do is iterate the items in the dropdownlist after you've bound them and modify their Text properties. The only other thing to do is get the concatenated field added to the data object.

share|improve this answer
add comment

All you need to do is override the .ToString() method of the Product.

public override string ToString()
{
    return ProductID + " " + ProductDescription;
}

Then all you need to do is bind to the drop down. From my understanding, the dropdown lables ar bound to the tostring() of the objects in the collection it's bound to.

in other words, do this.

List<Product> products = new List<Product>();     
products.Add(new Product() { ProductId = 1, Description = "Foo" });     
products.Add(new Product() { ProductId = 2, Description = "Bar" });     

var productQuery = products.Select(p => new { ProductId = p.ProductId, DisplayText =   p.ProductId.ToString() + " " + p.Description });     

skuDropDown.DataSource = productQuery;     
skuDropDown.DataBind();  
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.