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Why won't this compile?

#include <functional> 
#include <boost/function.hpp> 

class A { 
    A() { 
        typedef boost::function<void ()> FunctionCall; 
        FunctionCall f = std::bind1st(std::mem_fun(&A::process), this); 
    } 
    void process() {} 
};

Errors:

In file included from /opt/local/include/gcc44/c++/bits/stl_function.h:712,
                 from /opt/local/include/gcc44/c++/functional:50,
                 from a.cc:1:
/opt/local/include/gcc44/c++/backward/binders.h: In instantiation of 'std::binder1st<std::mem_fun_t<void, A> >':
a.cc:7:   instantiated from here
/opt/local/include/gcc44/c++/backward/binders.h:100: error: no type named 'second_argument_type' in 'class std::mem_fun_t<void, A>'
/opt/local/include/gcc44/c++/backward/binders.h:103: error: no type named 'first_argument_type' in 'class std::mem_fun_t<void, A>'
/opt/local/include/gcc44/c++/backward/binders.h:106: error: no type named 'first_argument_type' in 'class std::mem_fun_t<void, A>'
/opt/local/include/gcc44/c++/backward/binders.h:111: error: no type named 'second_argument_type' in 'class std::mem_fun_t<void, A>'
/opt/local/include/gcc44/c++/backward/binders.h:117: error: no type named 'second_argument_type' in 'class std::mem_fun_t<void, A>'
/opt/local/include/gcc44/c++/backward/binders.h: In function 'std::binder1st<_Operation> std::bind1st(const _Operation&, const _Tp&) [with _Operation = std::mem_fun_t<void, A>, _Tp = A*]':
a.cc:7:   instantiated from here
/opt/local/include/gcc44/c++/backward/binders.h:126: error: no type named 'first_argument_type' in 'class std::mem_fun_t<void, A>'
In file included from /opt/local/include/boost/function/detail/maybe_include.hpp:13,
                 from /opt/local/include/boost/function/detail/function_iterate.hpp:14,
                 from /opt/local/include/boost/preprocessor/iteration/detail/iter/forward1.hpp:47,
                 from /opt/local/include/boost/function.hpp:64,
                 from a.cc:2:
/opt/local/include/boost/function/function_template.hpp: In static member function 'static void boost::detail::function::void_function_obj_invoker0<FunctionObj, R>::invoke(boost::detail::function::function_buffer&) [with FunctionObj = std::binder1st<std::mem_fun_t<void, A> >, R = void]':
/opt/local/include/boost/function/function_template.hpp:913:   instantiated from 'void boost::function0<R>::assign_to(Functor) [with Functor = std::binder1st<std::mem_fun_t<void, A> >, R = void]'
/opt/local/include/boost/function/function_template.hpp:722:   instantiated from 'boost::function0<R>::function0(Functor, typename boost::enable_if_c<boost::type_traits::ice_not::value, int>::type) [with Functor = std::binder1st<std::mem_fun_t<void, A> >, R = void]'
/opt/local/include/boost/function/function_template.hpp:1064:   instantiated from 'boost::function<R()>::function(Functor, typename boost::enable_if_c<boost::type_traits::ice_not::value, int>::type) [with Functor = std::binder1st<std::mem_fun_t<void, A> >, R = void]'
a.cc:7:   instantiated from here
/opt/local/include/boost/function/function_template.hpp:153: error: no match for call to '(std::binder1st<std::mem_fun_t<void, A> >) ()'
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Because bind1st requires a binary function object. However you pass an unary function object. The function object binders of C++03 aren't as sophisticated as the one found in boost or tr1. In fact, they suffer from basic problems like not being able to handle functions with reference parameters.

Since you already use boost, i recommend to use boost::bind

FunctionCall f = boost::bind(&A::process, this); // yay!
share|improve this answer
    
Yay indeed. Thank you. –  Neil G May 26 '10 at 22:23
    
can I not do boost::bind(&(decltype(*this)::process), this) ? I want to put this into a macro. –  Neil G May 26 '10 at 22:27
1  
@Neil only the most recent draft made it possible to use decltype as nested name specifier (the thing before ::. Also you will need to remove the reference from the type, tho). I think the current GCC version may not yet support it. In that case, try working it around by saying &remove_reference<decltype(*this)>::type::process instead to get to it. –  Johannes Schaub - litb May 26 '10 at 22:30
    
Amazing. I thought about remove_ptr, but gave up too soon. Thank you very much. –  Neil G May 26 '10 at 22:44

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