Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
cache.set(key, value, 9999999)

But this is not infinite time...

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted
def _get_memcache_timeout(self, timeout):
    """
    Memcached deals with long (> 30 days) timeouts in a special
    way. Call this function to obtain a safe value for your timeout.
    """
    timeout = timeout or self.default_timeout
    if timeout > 2592000: # 60*60*24*30, 30 days
        # See http://code.google.com/p/memcached/wiki/FAQ
        # "You can set expire times up to 30 days in the future. After that
        # memcached interprets it as a date, and will expire the item after
        # said date. This is a simple (but obscure) mechanic."
        #
        # This means that we have to switch to absolute timestamps.
        timeout += int(time.time())
    return timeout

And from the FAQ:

What are the limits on setting expire time? (why is there a 30 day limit?)

You can set expire times up to 30 days in the future. After that memcached interprets it as a date, and will expire the item after said date. This is a simple (but obscure) mechanic.

share|improve this answer

Another simple technique is to write the generated HTML out to a file on the disk, and to use that as your cache. It's not hard to implement, and it works quite well as a file-based cache that NEVER expires, is quite transparent, etc.

It's not the django way, but it works well.

share|improve this answer
    
-1 Question was about memcache, this way it will be much slower. –  Viktor Stískala Mar 14 '12 at 16:49
    
What Viktor said! –  Autobyte Sep 6 '12 at 14:17
    
Depends. Slower than what? If you are generating a very complicated page, this can be faster than regenerating it from scratch, and yet be fast enough. If you're generating a simple page, this is slower than serving it from memcache. –  mlissner Nov 10 '12 at 20:33

From the docs:

Expiration times can be set from 0, meaning "never expire", to 30 days. Any time higher than 30 days is interpreted as a unix timestamp date

So, to set a key to never expire, set the timeout to 0.

share|improve this answer
2  
Is this bug relevant? code.djangoproject.com/ticket/9595 –  Alex Jun 4 '13 at 1:51

Support for non-expiring cache has been added in Django 1.6 by setting timeout=None

share|improve this answer
    
Django 1.6.2, Memcached 1.4.17. Was using timeout=0 and it was same as if i didn't cache at all. timeout=None is the way to go for non-expiring cache. –  Neara Mar 19 at 8:58

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.