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I want to use serial com port for communication and I want to implement a timeout every time I call the read function call.

int filedesc = open( "dev/ttyS0", O_RDWR );

read( filedesc, buff, len );

Thanks

EDIT:

I'm using Linux OS. How to implement using select function call?

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2  
See linux.die.net/man/2/select – sizzzzlerz May 27 '10 at 1:29
up vote 44 down vote accepted

select() takes 5 parameters, first the highest file descriptor + 1, then a fd_set for read, one for write and one for exceptions. The last paramter is a struct timeval, used for timeout. It return -1 on error, 0 on timeout or the number of file descriptors in the sets that are set.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/stat.h>
#include <fcntl.h>
#include <sys/select.h>

int main(void)
{
  fd_set set;
  struct timeval timeout;
  int rv;
  char buff[100];
  int len = 100;
  int filedesc = open( "dev/ttyS0", O_RDWR );

  FD_ZERO(&set); /* clear the set */
  FD_SET(filedesc, &set); /* add our file descriptor to the set */

  timeout.tv_sec = 0;
  timeout.tv_usec = 10000;

  rv = select(filedesc + 1, &set, NULL, NULL, &timeout);
  if(rv == -1)
    perror("select"); /* an error accured */
  else if(rv == 0)
    printf("timeout"); /* a timeout occured */
  else
    read( filedesc, buff, len ); /* there was data to read */
}
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2  
This solution is not good enough because if we are waiting for 5 bytes but received in time only 1 the select will be ok with it and then we will block forever at the read. – Roskoto Sep 28 '12 at 13:05
4  
No it wouldn't. If only one byte was available and you try to read 5, read() would not block, it would return 1 (number of bytes read). From the read man-page: "It is not an error if this number is smaller than the number of bytes requested; this may happen for example because fewer bytes are actually available right now (maybe because we were close to end-of-file, or because we are reading from a pipe, or from a terminal), or because read() was interrupted by a signal." – Puppe Oct 10 '12 at 7:09
    
and how to "select" time and again, the second time will return immediately. I want to know why ? – kangear Feb 1 '15 at 4:02
    
@kangear see man select and it will explain timeval timeout functionality. In short, it says "Consider timeout to be undefined after select() returns." and that means you should not reuse it if you're not really sure what (and where) you are doing. – Sampo Sarrala Oct 18 '15 at 16:37

As an alternative to select(), for the specific case of a serial port (terminal) you can use tcsetattr() to put the file descriptor into non-canonical mode, with a read timeout.

To do this, unset the ICANON flag, and set the VTIME control character:

struct termios termios;

tcgetattr(filedesc, &termios);
termios.c_lflag &= ~ICANON; /* Set non-canonical mode */
termios.c_cc[VTIME] = 100; /* Set timeout of 10.0 seconds */
tcsetattr(filedesc, TCSANOW, &termios);

Note VTIME is measured in tenths of a second, and that the type used for it is typically an unsigned char, meaning that the maximum timeout is 25.5 seconds.

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I hardly ever see anyone mention terminal read time outs. – nategoose May 27 '10 at 21:22
1  
In my case I also had to set VMIN to 0: termios.c_cc[VMIN] = 0. – João M. S. Silva Dec 4 '14 at 22:28

If you set the socket do operate in non-blocking mode, each call to read will read only the data currently available (if any). So this is effectively equal to an immediate timeout.

You can set non-blocking mode on a socket with a function like this:

int setnonblock(int sock) {
   int flags;
   flags = fcntl(sock, F_GETFL, 0);
   if (-1 == flags)
      return -1;
   return fcntl(sock, F_SETFL, flags | O_NONBLOCK);
}

(For more information about reading from non-blocking sockets see the read man page)

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You don't say what the OS is but if you're running under Linux, you could use the select call. It returns if there is something to read on the file descriptor or you can set it up so that it will timeout if there is nothing to read. The return code indicates which.

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Linux consider two type of device. "Slow" (e.g network) and "fast" one (e.g disk). Non blocking mode is for "slow" device, not "fast" one. Block devices as supposed to be "fast", so select/poll always tell that they are ready for I/O. For some flash device, this is a lie and I have seen some I/O call that use several seconds for few bytes even if select/poll tells that the device is ready. This said, even for slow device, there is no strong warranty on read delay itself; If you provide a buffer big enough and data is available (you have used select or poll to be sure of that), read call itself can use a significant amount of time (hundred of ms on network).

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Welcome to Stack Overflow. One of the primary goals of the site is to have answers that match what is requested in the question, and not just general tangentially related information. The question was "How to implement a timeout?", not "What are some timeout considerations for general devices?" Good luck. – David C. Rankin Oct 22 '15 at 8:09

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