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Can any body explains about the different categories of pointer(like wild pointers)?

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can you clarify? what categories? wild pointer is not a standard term. –  Naveen May 27 '10 at 7:18
    
Wild pointer is de facto standard term, meaning an uninitialized pointer variable pointing to some random location. For other similar terms, ask Google. –  Mart Oruaas May 27 '10 at 7:25
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Never heard of a wild pointer, and I have been doing this for a while. –  Loki Astari May 27 '10 at 7:39
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Me neither, but Wikipedia seems to like it. –  Dennis Zickefoose May 27 '10 at 7:44

5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted
  • Valid pointer: one pointing to a real object in memory
  • Invalid pointer: one pointing to memory that is not what it is supposed to be.
  • NULL pointer: A pointer whose value is 0 and thus points at nothing.
  • Dangling pointer (also sometimes wild pointer): one pointing to memory that has been deleted/freed.
  • Smart pointer: Not really a pointer at all, but rather an object which acts like a pointer, but manages the memory for you.
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But logically they're different. A pointer is invalid if you've run out of bounds or mistakenly assigned it to the wrong address, and dangling if you forgot it had been freed already –  Michał Trybus May 27 '10 at 7:32
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@SF: Not in C++. 0 is always the null pointer, for all pointers. 0 need not correspond to the memory address 0, but the compiler will hide the details there. So 0 is always safe to compare a pointer to. –  Dennis Zickefoose May 27 '10 at 7:43
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@SF: i thought you can always check if(pointer) as this is interpreted as if(pointer != 0) and comparison of a pointer and a constant zero is treated as a comparison to nullptr (no matter what it is). That's for us not to worry about these architectures where the null pointer is not zero. –  Michał Trybus May 27 '10 at 7:44
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Always thought that there is only one category - a memory address. I'm still thinking this way. Extra classification doesn't give benefits, so it isn't needed. –  SigTerm May 27 '10 at 7:48
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"Pointer to member function (&SomeClass::somemethod) has same size as void*". No it doesn't, in general. Not on MSVC9 for instance. –  MSalters May 27 '10 at 13:23

There are also function pointers, which point to code rather than objects. And pointers to members, which require an instance of a class to fully dereference. And pointers to member functions, which point to code and requires and an instance of a class to fully dereference.

There are several different types of smart pointers as well. These are used to wrap up dynamic memory allocations, and track ownership of the underlying data. When nobody owns the data any more, the dynamic memory is automatically released. The three biggies here are scoped pointers, shared pointers, and weak pointers. Scoped pointers only have one owner, and when they go out of scope they get deleted [see std::auto_ptr in C++03 and std::unique_ptr in C++0x]. Shared pointers can have many owners, and the memory doesn't get freed until all the owners are done with them. Weak pointers are a form of these, but they don't maintain strict ownership at all times; they request ownership when they need it, and that request is denied if the corresponding shared pointer has run out of owners.

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+1 for pointers to members;) –  Michał Trybus May 27 '10 at 7:46
    
Pointers to members require an instance, not a class to dereference. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas May 27 '10 at 9:22
    
Sorry, yes, you are correct. –  Dennis Zickefoose May 27 '10 at 9:27

...adding orthogonally to Steve's answer -

  • pointer to a variable (int*, char*, also void* which is a special pseudo-type which must always be cast before dereferencing. Also pointers to pointers.)
  • pointer to a function (void(*)(), int(*)(int)) and so on.)

The distinction is important because one family can't be cast into the other, and vice versa.

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You could also add another level of categorization and sort pointers according to their "constness":

Pointer to a const - You can change to pointer, but not what it points to.

Example:

int i = 42;
const int* pi = &i;

or

int i = 42;
int const* pi = &i;

Const pointer - You can't change what the pointer points to.

Example:

int i = 42;
int* const pi = &i;

Const pointer to a const - You can't change what the pointer points to and you can't change the pointer itself.

Example:

int i = 42;
const int* const pi = &i;
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Here is your answer:

C++ Pointers

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