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For example I have array:

int a[] = new int[]{3,4,6,2,1};

I need list of all permutations such tha if one is like this, {3,2,1,4,6}, others must not be the same. I know that if the length of the array is n then there are n! possible combinations. How can this algortihm be written?

Update: thanks, but I need a pseudo code algorithm like:

    for(int i=0;i<a.length;i++){
        // code here
    }

Just algorithm. Yes, API functions are good, but it does not help me too much.

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4  
There aren't 2^n possible combinations. There are n! permutations. Plus, I don't understand the question. Are you simply trying to exclude a single permutation, {3,2,1,4,6}? –  Marcelo Cantos May 27 '10 at 10:34
    
yes sorry n! no all permutation should be unique –  dato datuashvili May 27 '10 at 10:36
3  
This is a homework. Isn't it? –  tafa May 27 '10 at 10:39
2  
no really i am studing algorithms myself –  dato datuashvili May 27 '10 at 10:40

5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted

If you're using C++, you can use std::next_permutation from algorithm header:

int a[] = {3,4,6,2,1};
int size = sizeof(a)/sizeof(a[0]);
std::sort(a, a+size);
do {
  // print a's elements
} while(std::next_permutation(a, a+size));
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Here is how you can print all permutations in 10 lines of code:

public class Permute{
    static void permute(java.util.List<Integer> arr, int k){
        for(int i = k; i < arr.size(); i++){
            java.util.Collections.swap(arr, i, k);
            permute(arr, k+1);
            java.util.Collections.swap(arr, k, i);
        }
        if (k == arr.size() -1){
            System.out.println(java.util.Arrays.toString(arr.toArray()));
        }
    }
    public static void main(String[] args){
        Permute.permute(java.util.Arrays.asList(3,4,6,2,1), 0);
    }
}

You take first element of an array (k=0) and exchange it with any element (i) of the array. Then you recursively apply permutation on array starting with second element. This way you get all permutations starting with i-th element. The tricky part is that after recursive call you must swap i-th element with first element back, otherwise you could get repeated values at the first spot. By swapping it back we restore order of elements (basically you do backtracking).

Iterators and Extension to the case of repeated values

The drawback of previous algorithm is that it is recursive, and does not play nicely with iterators. Another issue is that if you allow repeated elements in your input, then it won't work as is.

For example, given input [3,3,4,4] all possible permutations (without repetitions) are

[3, 3, 4, 4]
[3, 4, 3, 4]
[3, 4, 4, 3]
[4, 3, 3, 4]
[4, 3, 4, 3]
[4, 4, 3, 3]

(if you simply apply permute function from above you will get [3,3,4,4] four times, and this is not what you naturally want to see in this case; and the number of such permutations is 4!/(2!*2!)=6)

It is possible to modify modify algorithm above handle this case, but it won't look sexy. Luckily, there is a better algorithm (I found it here) which handles repeated values and is not recursive.

First note, that permutation of array of any objects can be reduced to permutations of integers by enumerating them in any order.

To get permutations of an integer array, you start with an array sorted in ascending order. You 'goal' is to make it descending. To generate next permutation you are trying to find the first index from the bottom where sequence fails to be descending, and improves value in that index while switching order of the rest of the tail from descending to ascending in this case.

Here is the core of the algorithm:

//ind is an array of integers
for(int tail = ind.length - 1;tail > 0;tail--){
    if (ind[tail - 1] < ind[tail]){//still increasing

        //find last element which does not exceed ind[tail-1]
        int s = ind.length - 1;
        while(ind[tail-1] >= ind[s])
            s--;

        swap(ind, tail-1, s);

        //reverse order of elements in the tail
        for(int i = tail, j = ind.length - 1; i < j; i++, j--){
            swap(ind, i, j);
        }
        break;
    }
}

Here is the full code of iterator. Constructor accepts an array of objects, and maps them into an array of integers using HashMap.

import java.lang.reflect.Array;
import java.util.*;
class Permutations<E> implements  Iterator<E[]>{

    private E[] arr;
    private int[] ind;
    private boolean has_next;

    public E[] output;//next() returns this array, make it public

    Permutations(E[] arr){
        this.arr = arr.clone();
        ind = new int[arr.length];
        //convert an array of any elements into array of integers - first occurrence is used to enumerate
        Map<E, Integer> hm = new HashMap<E, Integer>();
        for(int i = 0; i < arr.length; i++){
            Integer n = hm.get(arr[i]);
            if (n == null){
                hm.put(arr[i], i);
                n = i;
            }
            ind[i] = n.intValue();
        }
        Arrays.sort(ind);//start with ascending sequence of integers


        //output = new E[arr.length]; <-- cannot do in Java with generics, so use reflection
        output = (E[]) Array.newInstance(arr.getClass().getComponentType(), arr.length);
        has_next = true;
    }

    public boolean hasNext() {
        return has_next;
    }

    /**
     * Computes next permutations. Same array instance is returned every time!
     * @return
     */
    public E[] next() {
        if (!has_next)
            throw new NoSuchElementException();

        for(int i = 0; i < ind.length; i++){
            output[i] = arr[ind[i]];
        }


        //get next permutation
        has_next = false;
        for(int tail = ind.length - 1;tail > 0;tail--){
            if (ind[tail - 1] < ind[tail]){//still increasing

                //find last element which does not exceed ind[tail-1]
                int s = ind.length - 1;
                while(ind[tail-1] >= ind[s])
                    s--;

                swap(ind, tail-1, s);

                //reverse order of elements in the tail
                for(int i = tail, j = ind.length - 1; i < j; i++, j--){
                    swap(ind, i, j);
                }
                has_next = true;
                break;
            }

        }
        return output;
    }

    private void swap(int[] arr, int i, int j){
        int t = arr[i];
        arr[i] = arr[j];
        arr[j] = t;
    }

    public void remove() {

    }
}

Usage/test:

    TCMath.Permutations<Integer> perm = new TCMath.Permutations<Integer>(new Integer[]{3,3,4,4,4,5,5});
    int count = 0;
    while(perm.hasNext()){
        System.out.println(Arrays.toString(perm.next()));
        count++;
    }
    System.out.println("total: " + count);

Prints out all 7!/(2!*3!*2!)=210 permutations.

share|improve this answer
    
Great Answer. Can you please explain why it's 4!/(2!2!)=6 and not 4!/(2!)=12 –  raam86 Jul 7 '13 at 22:06
    
First of all, I know that answer is 6 (from my [3,3,4,4] example). To derive the formula, think about [3,3,4,4] as two blue and two red balls. The question is how many ways to position balls (balls of the same color are the same). If you somehow position your balls, then interchanging of the blue balls (2! ways of doing that) or two red balls (2! ways of doing that) does not change anything. Now, we have 4! ways to place 4 balls, but permuting blue balls (2! ways) or red balls (2! ways) does not change positioning of the balls. So you get 4!/(2!*2!) as final answer –  Yevgen Yampolskiy Jul 10 '13 at 1:16

Here is an implementation of the Permutation in Java:

Permutation - Java

You should have a check on it!

Edit: code pasted below to protect against link-death:

// Permute.java -- A class generating all permutations

import java.util.Iterator;
import java.util.NoSuchElementException;
import java.lang.reflect.Array;

public class Permute implements Iterator {

   private final int size;
   private final Object [] elements;  // copy of original 0 .. size-1
   private final Object ar;           // array for output,  0 .. size-1
   private final int [] permutation;  // perm of nums 1..size, perm[0]=0

   private boolean next = true;

   // int[], double[] array won't work :-(
   public Permute (Object [] e) {
      size = e.length;
      elements = new Object [size];    // not suitable for primitives
      System.arraycopy (e, 0, elements, 0, size);
      ar = Array.newInstance (e.getClass().getComponentType(), size);
      System.arraycopy (e, 0, ar, 0, size);
      permutation = new int [size+1];
      for (int i=0; i<size+1; i++) {
         permutation [i]=i;
      }
   }

   private void formNextPermutation () {
      for (int i=0; i<size; i++) {
         // i+1 because perm[0] always = 0
         // perm[]-1 because the numbers 1..size are being permuted
         Array.set (ar, i, elements[permutation[i+1]-1]);
      }
   }

   public boolean hasNext() {
      return next;
   }

   public void remove() throws UnsupportedOperationException {
      throw new UnsupportedOperationException();
   }

   private void swap (final int i, final int j) {
      final int x = permutation[i];
      permutation[i] = permutation [j];
      permutation[j] = x;
   }

   // does not throw NoSuchElement; it wraps around!
   public Object next() throws NoSuchElementException {

      formNextPermutation ();  // copy original elements

      int i = size-1;
      while (permutation[i]>permutation[i+1]) i--;

      if (i==0) {
         next = false;
         for (int j=0; j<size+1; j++) {
            permutation [j]=j;
         }
         return ar;
      }

      int j = size;

      while (permutation[i]>permutation[j]) j--;
      swap (i,j);
      int r = size;
      int s = i+1;
      while (r>s) { swap(r,s); r--; s++; }

      return ar;
   }

   public String toString () {
      final int n = Array.getLength(ar);
      final StringBuffer sb = new StringBuffer ("[");
      for (int j=0; j<n; j++) {
         sb.append (Array.get(ar,j).toString());
         if (j<n-1) sb.append (",");
      }
      sb.append("]");
      return new String (sb);
   }

   public static void main (String [] args) {
      for (Iterator i = new Permute(args); i.hasNext(); ) {
         final String [] a = (String []) i.next();
         System.out.println (i);
      }
   }
}
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4  
+1 please add the relevant code to your post though, in case the link ever goes down –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft May 27 '10 at 20:30
    
Which license applies to this code? –  Vidar S. Ramdal Oct 3 '13 at 10:23

This a 2-permutation for a list wrapped in an iterator

import java.util.Iterator;
import java.util.LinkedList;
import java.util.List;

/* all permutations of two objects 
 * 
 * for ABC: AB AC BA BC CA CB
 * 
 * */
public class ListPermutation<T> implements Iterator {

    int index = 0;
    int current = 0;
    List<T> list;

    public ListPermutation(List<T> e) {
        list = e;
    }

    public boolean hasNext() {
        return !(index == list.size() - 1 && current == list.size() - 1);
    }

    public List<T> next() {
        if(current == index) {
            current++;
        }
        if (current == list.size()) {
            current = 0;
            index++;
        }
        List<T> output = new LinkedList<T>();
        output.add(list.get(index));
        output.add(list.get(current));
        current++;
        return output;
    }

    public void remove() {
    }

}
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Visual representation of the 3-item recursive solution: http://www.docdroid.net/ea0s/generatepermutations.pdf.html

Breakdown:

  1. For a two-item array, there are two permutations:
    • The original array, and
    • The two elements swapped
  2. For a three-item array, there are six permutations:
    • The permutations of the bottom two elements, then
    • Swap 1st and 2nd items, and the permutations of the bottom two element
    • Swap 1st and 3rd items, and the permutations of the bottom two elements.
    • Essentially, each of the items gets its chance at the first slot
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