Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Consider the following code, which is calling against an EF generated data context:

var context = new DataContext();
var employees = context.Employees.Include("Department");

If I change the name of the Department relationship then this code is going to start throwing a runtime error. So is there any way to call the .Include() method in a safe manner, so I get compile time checking for all the relationships being referenced?

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

I did a little extension to ObjectQuery which goes like this

public static ObjectQuery<TEntity> Include<TEntity, TProperty>(this ObjectQuery<TEntity> query, Expression<Func<TEntity, TProperty>> expression) where TEntity : class
{
    string name = expression.GetPropertyName();
    return query.Include(name);
}

which also requires

public static class ExpressionExtensions
{
    public static string GetPropertyName<TObject, TProperty>(this Expression<Func<TObject, TProperty>> expression) where TObject : class
    {
        if (expression.Body.NodeType == ExpressionType.Call)
        {
            MethodCallExpression methodCallExpression = (MethodCallExpression)expression.Body;
            string name = ExpressionExtensions.GetPropertyName(methodCallExpression);
            return name.Substring(expression.Parameters[0].Name.Length + 1);
        }
        return expression.Body.ToString().Substring(expression.Parameters[0].Name.Length + 1);
    }

    private static string GetPropertyName(MethodCallExpression expression)
    {
        MethodCallExpression methodCallExpression = expression.Object as MethodCallExpression;
        if (methodCallExpression != null)
        {
            return GetPropertyName(methodCallExpression);
        }
        return expression.Object.ToString();
    }
}

with that you can do

var context = new DataContext();      
var employees = context.Employees.Include(e => e.Department);

which is going to be check at compile time. If i remember correctly, this methods doesn't work for many-to-many relationship but it works for stuff like

var item = context.Employees.Include(e => e.Department.Manager);

Good luck to you

share|improve this answer
1  
All it is doing is taking the name of the property and putting it to string so your Entity must have the same name as that property for his to work, so it might work for many-to-many –  moi_meme May 27 '10 at 14:07
    
Correct me if im wrong, but this won't work for double-nested nav's (e.g Orders.Details.Products). –  RPM1984 Jan 10 '11 at 10:30
    
@RPM1984 it won't work when it's an EntityCollection... you cannot refer properties of an entity collection. –  moi_meme Jan 10 '11 at 20:56
    
@moi_meme - not sure what you mean, but if im using pure POCO's, and if i have three entities, sometimes i want to eager load the second and third entities when i retrieve the first. Therefore the expression would need to be Include(x => x.Order.Details.Products) (Details/Products is ICollection<T>). I don't think this would create the . required for the include string. –  RPM1984 Jan 10 '11 at 22:26
    
@RPM1984 - It doesn't work for collection since simply writing Include(x => x.Order.Details.Products) will generate an compile time error... –  moi_meme Jan 14 '11 at 13:51
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Taking moi_meme's idea a step further, my colleague developed the following solution that works in all cases. He introduced a new method caled Includes() for dealing with one-to-many and many-to-many relationships. It allows you to write this:

context.Customer
    .Include("Address")
    .Include("Orders")
    .Include("Orders.OrderLines")

as this:

context.Customer
    .Include(c => c.Address)
    .Includes(c => c.Include(customer => customer.Orders)
                    .Include(order => order.OrderLines))

All credit goes to http://stackoverflow.com/users/70427/bojan-resnik, so go give him some love if you like the solution.

public static class ObjectQueryExtensions
{
    public static ObjectQuery<T> Includes<T>(this ObjectQuery<T> query, Action<IncludeObjectQuery<T, T>> action)
    {
        var sb = new StringBuilder();
        var queryBuilder = new IncludeObjectQuery<T, T>(query, sb);
        action(queryBuilder);
        return queryBuilder.Query;
    }

    public static ObjectQuery<TEntity> Include<TEntity, TProperty>(this ObjectQuery<TEntity> query, Expression<Func<TEntity, TProperty>> expression)
    {
        var sb = new StringBuilder();
        return IncludeAllLevels(expression, sb, query);
    }

    static ObjectQuery<TQuery> IncludeAllLevels<TEntity, TProperty, TQuery>(Expression<Func<TEntity, TProperty>> expression, StringBuilder sb, ObjectQuery<TQuery> query)
    {
        foreach (var name in expression.GetPropertyLevels())
        {
            sb.Append(name);
            query = query.Include(sb.ToString());
            Debug.WriteLine(string.Format("Include(\"{0}\")", sb));
            sb.Append('.');
        }
        return query;
    }

    static IEnumerable<string> GetPropertyLevels<TClass, TProperty>(this Expression<Func<TClass, TProperty>> expression)
    {
        var namesInReverse = new List<string>();

        var unaryExpression = expression as UnaryExpression;
        var body = unaryExpression != null ? unaryExpression.Operand : expression.Body;

        while (body != null)
        {
            var memberExpression = body as MemberExpression;
            if (memberExpression == null)
                break;

            namesInReverse.Add(memberExpression.Member.Name);
            body = memberExpression.Expression;
        }

        namesInReverse.Reverse();
        return namesInReverse;
    }

    public class IncludeObjectQuery<TQuery, T>
    {
        readonly StringBuilder _pathBuilder;
        public ObjectQuery<TQuery> Query { get; private set; }

        public IncludeObjectQuery(ObjectQuery<TQuery> query, StringBuilder builder)
        {
            _pathBuilder = builder;
            Query = query;
        }

        public IncludeObjectQuery<TQuery, U> Include<U>(Expression<Func<T, U>> expression)
        {
            Query = ObjectQueryExtensions.IncludeAllLevels(expression, _pathBuilder, Query);
            return new IncludeObjectQuery<TQuery, U>(Query, _pathBuilder);
        }

        public IncludeObjectQuery<TQuery, U> Include<U>(Expression<Func<T, EntityCollection<U>>> expression) where U : class
        {
            Query = ObjectQueryExtensions.IncludeAllLevels(expression, _pathBuilder, Query);
            return new IncludeObjectQuery<TQuery, U>(Query, _pathBuilder);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Very impressive, i guess i'm gonna have to try that :) cheers!! –  moi_meme Jun 2 '11 at 12:27
var context = new DataContext();
var employees = context.Employees.Include(context.Department.EntitySet.Name);
share|improve this answer

I have used the following with Entity Framework 5. The key is to include System.Data.Entity

using System.Data.Entity;

context.Customer
    .Include(c => c.Address)
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.