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Do you know a way to trap, log, and re-raise exception in Delphi code? A simple example:

procedure TForm3.Button1Click(Sender: TObject);
begin
  try
    raise Exception.Create('Bum');
  except
    on E: Exception do
    begin
      MyHandleException(E);
    end;
  end;
end;

procedure TForm3.MyHandleException(AException: Exception);
begin
  ShowMessage(AException.Message);
  LogThis(AException.Message);  
  // raise AException; - this will access violate
end;

So I need to re-raise it in the except block but I was wondering if there is a better way to write my own method to handle and (on specific conditions) to re-raise exceptions.

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3  
Just re-raise it the usual way. It keeps your code self-documenting and doesn't mess up the stack trace. –  Igby Largeman May 27 '10 at 17:25
    
yep I definitely want to preserve the stack! –  Nik May 27 '10 at 17:51
3  
If it is logging of exceptions you are after, you should take a look at madExcept, EurekaLog and/or Jedi. Each have better handling of exception logging you could ever dream of doing yourself. –  Lieven Keersmaekers May 28 '10 at 7:47
1  
Yea I know the tools, I prefer EurekaLog, but it is not to me to use and how to use those tool with clients .. so I'm doing what I can :) –  Nik May 31 '10 at 17:30

5 Answers 5

up vote 23 down vote accepted

If you want to re-raise the exception only under certain conditions, write

procedure TForm3.Button1Click(Sender: TObject);
begin
  try
    raise Exception.Create('Bum');
  except
    on E: Exception do
    begin
      if MyHandleException(E) then
        raise;
    end;
  end;
end;

function TForm3.MyHandleException(AException: Exception): boolean;
begin
  ShowMessage(AException.Message);
  result := true/false;
end;
share|improve this answer
    
this is good idea and I had it in mind but still I waned to know is there other code-less way to do it in a separate function. Thanks. –  Nik May 27 '10 at 17:48

The following will work, but is of course not ideal for 2 reasons:

  • The exception is raised from a different place in the call stack.
  • You don't get an exact copy of the exception - especially those classes that add attributes. I.e. you'll have to explicitly copy the attributes you need.
  • Copying custom attributes can get messy due to required type checking.

.

procedure TForm3.MyHandleException(AException: Exception);
begin
  ShowMessage(AException.Message);
  LogThis(AException.Message);  
  raise ExceptClass(AException.ClassType).Create(AException.Message);
end;

The benefits are that you preserve the original exception class, and message (and any other attributes you wish to copy).

Ideally you'd want to call System._RaiseAgain, but alas that is a 'compiler-magic' routine and can only be called by raise;.

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+1 : I've been looking for a way to reraise an exception outside of the try...except block for quite some time now. I realize you lose the call stack, but for reraising an exception in the main VCL thread that occurred in another thread -- this works very nicely. Thanks! –  James L. Mar 11 '12 at 8:14

You could try to use (system.pas):

function AcquireExceptionObject: Pointer;

AcquireExceptionObject returns a pointer to the current exception object and prevents the exception object from being deallocated when the current exception handler exits.

Note: AcquireExceptionObject increments the exception object's reference count. Make sure that the reference count is decremented when the exception object is no longer needed. This happens automatically if you use the exception object to re-raise the exception. In all other cases, every call to AcquireExceptionObject must have a matching call to ReleaseExceptionObject. AcquireExceptionObject/ReleaseExceptionObject sequences can be nested.

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Interesting I will give a try to this. Thanks for the details. –  Nik May 31 '10 at 17:30
    
Beware--In Delphi 2007 at least, ReleaseExceptionObject is an empty method. Using it in conjunction with AcquireExceptionObject results in a memory leak. I have found FreeAndNil to work as an alternative. –  Chad N B Sep 25 '13 at 22:10
    
In D2009 ReleaseExceptionObject is also empty. I wonder wheter documentation is correct about this reference counting. Exception is derived from TObject not from TInterfacedObject. –  Wodzu Jul 23 at 11:19

Following on from Craig Young's post, I've used something along the lines of the following code successfully. You can preserve the original exception location by using the "at" identifier with the ExceptAddr function. The original exception class type and information is also preserved.

procedure MyHandleException(AMethod: string);
var
  e: Exception;
begin
  e := Exception(AcquireExceptionObject);
  e.Message := e.Message + ' raised in ' + AMethod; 
  raise e at ExceptAddr;
end;

try
  ...
except
  MyHandleException('MyMethod');
end;
share|improve this answer

You should be able to just use the Raise command by itself to re-raise the exception:

begin
  MyHandleException(E);
  Raise;
end;
share|improve this answer
1  
I think that's exactly what he's trying not to do: have to put a raise after MyHandleException every time he calls it by putting the raise inside MyHandleException itself. –  Mason Wheeler May 27 '10 at 17:21
    
@Mason: You may well be correct. I was probably reading it incorrectly. I'll delete my answer ... after a bit so you have a chance to see this comment :) –  Mark Wilkins May 27 '10 at 17:23
    
I think it is right. He put the raise in a procedure called within the except block, which does not work. The raise needs to be precisely in the except block. If you write raise AException in the external procedure, you do get an access violation. –  Andreas Rejbrand May 27 '10 at 17:25
3  
Don't delete your answer. Your code snippet might be useful to others wondering how to re-raise an exception from within the except block. And learning that it is not possible to do it anywhere else. –  PA. May 27 '10 at 17:26
    
That makes sense - I'll leave it in place since I don't think the information is inherently wrong. –  Mark Wilkins May 27 '10 at 17:42

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