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What are the differences between git pull and git fetch?

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I found this well written article about git fetch and git pull it's worth the reading: longair.net/blog/2009/04/16/git-fetch-and-merge –  Marcos Oliveira Sep 16 '10 at 6:57
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You may also find this helpful: stackoverflow.com/a/9204499/631619 –  Michael Durrant Apr 14 '13 at 20:56
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See this link for my new answer. stackoverflow.com/a/22073346/2218635 –  Ramesh Rajendran Feb 27 at 15:44
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Our alternative approach has become git fetch; git reset --hard origin/master as part of our workflow. It blows away local changes, keeps you up to date with master BUT makes sure you don't just pull in new changes on top on current changes and make a mess. We've used it for a while and it basically feels a lot safer in practice. Just be sure to add/commit/stash any work-in-progress first ! –  Michael Durrant May 4 at 14:32

19 Answers 19

up vote 3059 down vote accepted

In the simplest terms, git pull does a git fetch followed by a git merge.

You can do a git fetch at any time to update your remote-tracking branches under refs/remotes/<remote>/. This operation never changes any of your own local branches under refs/heads, and is safe to do without changing your working copy. I have even heard of people running git fetch periodically in a cron job in the background (although I wouldn't recommend doing this).

A git pull is what you would do to bring a local branch up-to-date with its remote version, while also updating your other remote-tracking branches.

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"A "git pull" is what you would do to bring your repository up to date" <- isn't the repository update already done by fetch? don't you mean it brings your local branches up-to-date with the remote branches? To the merge: It merges the remote branches with your local copies of those branches, or what exactly does it merge here? –  Albert Nov 10 '09 at 12:13
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@Albert: Yeah, it's weirdly worded. git pull will always merge into the current branch. So you select which branch you want to pull from, and it pulls it into the current branch. The from branch can be local or remote; it can even be a remote branch that's not a registered git remote (meaning you pass a URL on the git pull command line). –  intuited Jun 6 '10 at 10:10
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@espertus: No. Pushing never automatically does a merge. The user is expected to pull, resolving any merge conflicts locally, then push back to the remote. –  Greg Hewgill Mar 17 '11 at 0:41
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If I am at /home/alice/ and do git fetch /home/bob, what parameters should I pass to the subsequent git merge ? –  ripper234 May 27 '11 at 19:38
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Note to people learning Git: pull can't actually be emulated by a fetch plus a merge. I just fetched a change where only a remote branch pointer changes, and merge refuses to do anything. pull, on the other hand, fast-forwards my tracking branch. –  romkyns Sep 28 '12 at 16:23
  • When you use pull, Git tries to automatically do your work for you. It is context sensitive, so Git will merge any pulled commits into the branch you are currently working in. pull automatically merges the commits without letting you review them first. If you don’t closely manage your branches you may run into frequent conflicts.

  • When you fetch, Git gathers any commits from the target branch that do not exist in your current branch and stores them in your local repository. However, it does not merge them with your current branch. This is particularly useful if you need to keep your repository up to date, but are working on something that might break if you update your files. To integrate the commits into your master branch, you use merge.

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+1 good explanation and note that you can also could also do a rebase instead of a merge –  Justin Ohms Aug 31 '12 at 19:55
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Agreed, great comment. Which is why I hate git pull. When would it ever make sense to let a revision tool make code edits for you? And isn't that what merging two files is doing? What if those two edits are physically separated in the file, but LOGICALLY at odds? –  Lee Dixon May 13 '13 at 18:44
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@elexhobby short put, git fetch only updates your .git/ directory (AKA: local repository) and nothing outside .git/ (AKA: working tree). It does not change your local branches, and it does not touch master either. It touches remotes/origin/master though (see git branch -avv). If you have more remotes, try git remote update. This is a git fetch for all remotes in one command. –  Tino Jul 17 '13 at 6:48
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@Tino yours is really the most important point. People may not know that "remote" branches are actually stored as a bunch of hashes in .git/refs/remotes/origin/. –  twopoint718 Sep 12 '13 at 21:49
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Once I understood that everything was going 'though' tracking branches I finally really understood git. Without that knowledge it's just 'magic'. –  Michael Durrant Sep 19 '13 at 19:55

It is important to contrast the design philosophy of git with the philosophy of a more traditional source control tool like svn.

Subversion was designed and built with a client/server model. There is a single repository that is the server, and several clients can fetch code from the server, work on it, then commit it back to the server. The assumption is that the client can always contact the server when it needs to perform an operation.

Git was designed to support a more distributed model with no need for a central repository (though you can certainly use one if you like.) Also git was designed so that the client and the "server" don't need to be online at the same time. Git was designed so that people on an unreliable link could exchange code via email, even. It is possible to work completely disconnected and burn a CD to exchange code via git.

In order to support this model git maintains a local repository with your code and also an additional local repository that mirrors the state of the remote repository. By keeping a copy of the remote repository locally, git can figure out the changes needed even when the remote repository is not reachable. Later when you need to send the changes to someone else, git can transfer them as a set of changes from a point in time known to the remote repository.

  • git fetch is the command that says "bring my local copy of the remote repository up to date."

  • git pull says "bring the changes in the remote repository where I keep my own code."

Normally "git pull" does this by doing a "git fetch" to bring the local copy of the remote repository up to date, and then merging the changes into your own code repository and possibly your working copy.

The take away is to keep in mind that there are often at least three copies of a project on your workstation. One copy is your own repository with your own commit history. The second copy is your working copy where you are editing and building. The third copy is your local "cached" copy of a remote repository.

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Only three? How about staging and stashing? ;) –  Tino Jul 17 '13 at 6:57
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Technically, the local and remote repositories are really one and the same. In Git, a repository is a DAG of commits pointing to their parents. Branches are, technically, nothing more than meaningful names of commits. The only difference between local and remote branches is that remote ones are prefixed with remoteName/ Git from the ground up is a very good read. Once you get an understanding of how Git works - and it's beautifully simple, really - everything just makes sense. –  Emil Lundberg Aug 14 '13 at 9:51
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Thanks much for the explanation. I didn't really understand until now that Git was designed so you didn't have to have a central repository. Everyone always says "DVCS" when describing Git, but as a relatively new programmer, that means nothing to me. I've never seen a CVCS, and I've also never not worked with a cental remote repository when collaborating with others (i.e. Github), so until now I've yet to understand what made Git special. –  Bepetersn Aug 15 '13 at 2:17
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So, based on this, why ISN'T it a good idea to git-fetch with a cron job? Always keeping a copy of the remote you're working with on your local machine seems like a good idea. In fact, I feel like writing a script that checks to see if I've updated my remote in the past 24 hours and linking it up with a udev hook for internet connection. –  Bepetersn Aug 15 '13 at 2:23
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@Nabheet: I believe the additional copies are not stored as ordinary files on your file system, but instead as alternate histories (changesets) inside your git repository files. –  Cory Sep 17 '13 at 2:55

One use case of git fetch is that the following will tell you any changes in the remote branch since your last pull... so you can check before doing an actual pull, which could change files in your current branch and working copy.

git fetch
git diff ...origin
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Great addition! I was confused by the dots, isn't it: git diff origin –  harm Jul 27 '10 at 12:15
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@harm - mepster missed the space between '...' and origin: git fetch git diff ... origin/... . Ellipses ('...') conventionally serve as a placeholder for optional parameters, in this case the local branch. In my example above I've also used them to indicate you an optionally specify the remote branch you are diff-ing against. –  Compustretch May 8 '11 at 23:08
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why not git diff ..origin? –  Erik Allik Feb 12 '12 at 23:47
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git diff origin and git diff ..origin seem to work but not this weird ... stuff –  Marc Jan 8 '13 at 19:32
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@Compustretch There was not supposed to be a space. git diff ...origin is equivalent to git diff $(git-merge-base HEAD origin) origin (see the git diff [--options] <commit>...<commit> [--] [<path>…] section of kernel.org/pub/software/scm/git/docs/git-diff.html#_description), which is different from git diff origin; git diff ...origin is conceptually the changes made in origin since the current branch branched from origin, while git diff origin includes also the reverse of the changes made in the current branch since it branched from origin. –  Max Nanasy Aug 1 '13 at 19:34

It cost me a little bit to understand what was the difference, but this is a simple explanation. "master" in your localhost is a branch.

When you clone a repository you fetch the entire repository to you local host. This means that at that time you have an origin/master pointer to HEAD and master pointing to the same HEAD.

when you start working and do commits you advance the master pointer to HEAD + your commits. But the origin/master pointer is still pointing to what it was when you cloned.

So the difference will be:

  • If you do a "git fetch" it will just fetch all the changes in the remote repository (GitHub) and move the origin/master pointer to HEAD. Meanwhile your local branch master will keep pointing to where it has.
  • If you do a "git pull", it will do basically fetch (as explained previously) and merge any new changes to your master branch and move the pointer to HEAD
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+1- the best explanation. I kept reading answers and saying "but WHERE does fetch put everything?" –  Nate Glenn Mar 21 '13 at 19:14
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origin/master is a local branch that is a COPY of master on origin. When you fetch, you update local:/origin/master. Once you really grok that everything in git is a branch, this makes a lot of sense and is a very powerful way to maintain different changesets, make quick local branches, merge and rebase, and generally get a lot of value out of the cheap branching model. –  cam8001 May 28 '13 at 16:00
git-pull - Fetch from and merge with another repository or a local branch
SYNOPSIS

git pull   …
DESCRIPTION

Runs git-fetch with the given parameters, and calls git-merge to merge the 
retrieved head(s) into the current branch. With --rebase, calls git-rebase 
instead of git-merge.

Note that you can use . (current directory) as the <repository> to pull 
from the local repository — this is useful when merging local branches 
into the current branch.

Also note that options meant for git-pull itself and underlying git-merge 
must be given before the options meant for git-fetch.

You would pull if you want the histories merged, you'd fetch if you just 'want the codez' as some person has been tagging some articles around here.

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Very interesting, but I can't really see a use case where you want "just the code". Et what happen with your code when you fetch? Is it erased? What happen whith the remote changes? How does it goes into your repo whithout erasing your code if you don't merge? –  e-satis Mar 27 '10 at 16:21
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@e-satis: The remote branch is also stored locally on your machine. So when you do git fetch it fetches changes from the repository and updates your local remote branch. It does not affect your local branch which tracks the local remote branch, so does not affect your working copy. Now, when you do a merge it will merge the fetched changes with your local branch. –  jeffreyveon Oct 31 '11 at 4:23
    
A simple use case for the fetch command: perform time consuming operations involving other people's recent commits, such as a merge or a code review, accessing only your up-to-date local repository without network connectivity requirements, because you previously used fetch to download everything you need quickly (e.g. while you are visiting some other developer and connected to some other repository's network). The pull command would download the same commits, but the merging it performs can be undesirable. –  Lorenzo Gatti Sep 19 '13 at 10:25

Be careful with git pull --rebase. This warning is from the git-pull man page:

This is a potentially dangerous mode of operation. It rewrites history, which does not bode well when you published that history already. Do not use this option unless you have read git-rebase(1) carefully.

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+1 This is why if I'm working in a situation where I want to rebase I always do a fetch and then rebase. –  Justin Ohms Aug 31 '12 at 19:58
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@JustinOhms If git pull --rebase is not the right thing in the given situation, is it right if it is done in two steps? If it is the right thing to do, what is extra the benefit to doing it in two steps? –  Kaz May 23 '13 at 21:56
    
@Kaz - because the rebase is not automatic. Fetching the changes first allows you to make the judgement call. It doesn't fix the problem with rebasing history you've already pushed. It will allow you to see if it is safe to rebase changes you have not already pushed. –  Justin Ohms May 24 '13 at 21:11
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@JustinOhms How would you decide whether it is safe to rebase changes? I would just try git rebase, and backtrack if it made a mess, in which case I might as well do git pull --rebase. But maybe you have some other way? –  Kaz May 25 '13 at 6:14
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@KaZ gitk allows you to see the branch structure visually. It will show your the position of your local head, remotes, and your branch structures in relation to what you have fetched. This way you can ensure that you are not rebasing fetched changes that are based on an ancestor that is prior to what you have already pushed to your remote(s). –  Justin Ohms May 28 '13 at 19:18

You can fetch from a remote repository, see the differences and then pull or merge.

This is an example for a remote repository called origin and a branch called master tracking the remote branch origin/master:

git checkout master                                                  
git fetch                                        
git diff origin/master
git pull --rebase origin master
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You probably want to skip the pull and just do a "git rebase origin" as the last step since you already fetched the changes. The reason is that someone could have pushed changes in the time since you did the fetch and these would not have been in fetch that you did the diff review on. –  Justin Ohms Aug 31 '12 at 20:02

Briefly

git fetch is similar to pull but doesn't merge. i.e. it fetches remote updates (refs and objects) but no updates are made locally.

git pull pulls down from a remote and instantly merges.

More

git clone clones a repo.

git rebase saves stuff from your current branch that isn't in the upstream branch to a temporary area. Your branch is now the same as before you started your changes. So, git pull -rebase will pull down the remote changes, rewind your local branch, replay your changes over the top of your current branch one by one until you're up-to-date.

Also, git branch -a will show you exactly what’s going on with all your branches - local and remote.

This blog post was useful:

The difference between git pull, git fetch and git clone (and git rebase) - Mike Pearce

and covers git pull, git fetch, git clone and git rebase.

====

UPDATE

I thought I'd update this to show how you'd actually use this in practice.

  1. Update your local repo from the remote (but don't merge):

    git fetch

  2. After downloading the updates, let's see the differences:

    git diff master origin/master

  3. If you're happy with those updates, then merge:

    git pull

Notes:

On step 2: For more on diffs between local and remotes, see: compare local git branch with remote branch?

On step 3: It's probably more accurate (e.g. on a fast changing repo) to do a git rebase origin here. See @Justin Ohms comment in another answer.

See also: http://longair.net/blog/2009/04/16/git-fetch-and-merge/

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Sounds to me like if someone just wants the local code to reflect "the tip", they should use git clone. I put the tip in quotes, as I assume it would mean whatever master is and what someone would "Download as zip" from github.com –  Chris K Sep 12 '13 at 8:27

I like to have some visual representation of the situation to grasp these things. Maybe other developers would like to see it too, so here's my addition. I'm not totally sure that it all is correct, so please comment if you find any mistakes.

                                         LOCAL SYSTEM
                  . =====================================================    
================= . =================  ===================  =============
REMOTE REPOSITORY . REMOTE REPOSITORY  LOCAL REPOSITORY     WORKING COPY
(ORIGIN)          . (CACHED)           
for example,      . mirror of the      
a github repo.    . remote repo
Can also be       .
multiple repo's   .
                  .
                  .
FETCH  *------------------>*
Your local cache of the remote is updated with the origin (or multiple
external sources, that is git's distributed nature)
                  .
PULL   *-------------------------------------------------------->*
changes are merged directly into your local copy. when conflicts occur, 
you are asked for decisions.
                  .
COMMIT            .                             *<---------------*
When coming from, for example, subversion, you might think that a commit
will update the origin. In git, a commit is only done to your local repo.
                  .
PUSH   *<---------------------------------------*
Synchronizes your changes back into the origin.

Some major advantages for having a fetched mirror of the remote are:

  • Performance (scroll through all commits and messages without trying to squeeze it through the network)
  • Feedback about the state of your local repo (for example, I use Atlassian's SourceTree, which will give me a bulb indicating if I'm commits ahead or behind compared to the origin. This information can be updated with a GIT FETCH).
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Doesn't a git pull also perform a merge, i.e. going all the way to the working copy? –  Kamiel Wanrooij Mar 24 at 17:28
    
Good point, yes it will put all the changes in your working copy, and then you can commit it yourself into the local repo. I will update the visual. –  Justus Romijn Mar 25 at 7:50

I have struggled with this as well. In fact I got here with a google search of exactly the same question. Reading all these answers finally painted a picture in my head and I decided to try to get this down looking at the state of the 2 repositories and 1 sandbox and actions preformed over time while watching the version of them. So here is what I came up with. Please correct me if I messed up anywhere.

The three repos with a fetch

---------------------     -----------------------     -----------------------
- Remote Repo       -     - Remote Repo         -     - Remote Repo         -
-                   -     - gets pushed         -     -                     -
- @ R01             -     - @ R02               -     - @ R02               -
---------------------     -----------------------     -----------------------

---------------------     -----------------------     -----------------------
- Local Repo        -     - Local Repo          -     - Local Repo          -
- pull              -     -                     -     - fetch               -
- @ R01             -     - @ R01               -     - @ R02               -
---------------------     -----------------------     -----------------------

---------------------     -----------------------     -----------------------
- Local Sandbox     -     - Local Sandbox       -     - Local Sandbox       -
- Checkout          -     - new work done       -     -                     -
- @ R01             -     - @ R01+              -     - @R01+               -
---------------------     -----------------------     -----------------------

The three repos with a pull

---------------------     -----------------------     -----------------------
- Remote Repo       -     - Remote Repo         -     - Remote Repo         -
-                   -     - gets pushed         -     -                     -
- @ R01             -     - @ R02               -     - @ R02               -
---------------------     -----------------------     -----------------------

---------------------     -----------------------     -----------------------
- Local Repo        -     - Local Repo          -     - Local Repo          -
- pull              -     -                     -     - pull                -
- @ R01             -     - @ R01               -     - @ R02               -
---------------------     -----------------------     -----------------------

---------------------     -----------------------     -----------------------
- Local Sandbox     -     - Local Sandbox       -     - Local Sandbox       -
- Checkout          -     - new work done       -     - merged with R02     -
- @ R01             -     - @ R01+              -     - @R02+               -
---------------------     -----------------------     -----------------------

This helped me understand why a fetch is pretty important.

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Can you please tell me what the + means after @ RO1 / R02 ? –  user424174 Jul 6 '13 at 14:06
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I think @pn1 dude implies the sandbox is R01 plus some local changes that have not yet been committed. –  Quinn Comendant Jan 11 at 4:55

git fetch will retrieve remote branches so that you can git diff or git merge them with the current branch. git pull will run fetch on the remote brach tracked by the current branch and then merge the result. You can use git fetch to see if there are any updates to the remote branch without necessary merging them with your local branch.

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We simply say:

git pull == git fetch + git merge

If you run git pull, you do not need to merge the data to local. If you run git fetch, it means you must run git merge for getting the latest code to your local machine. Otherwise, the local machine code would not be changed without merge.

So in the Git Gui, when you do fetch, you have to merge the data. Fetch itself won't make the code changes at your local. You can check that when you update the code by fetching once fetch and see; the code it won't change. Then you merge... You will see the changed code.

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I'd rather say git pull == git fetch + git merge :) –  melvkim Jun 7 '13 at 10:38
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But git pull --rebase = git fetch + git rebase –  Tino Jul 17 '13 at 7:06

The only difference between git pull and git fetch is that :

git pull pulls from a remote branch and merges it.

git fetch only fetches from the remote branch but it does not merge

i.e. git pull = git fetch + git merge ...

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And neither help if git thinks you are behind by commits and can "fast-forward", which upon I ended up rm -rfing the whole thing and starting over. Stupid Git, please just let me get current so I can go back to work? –  Chris K Sep 11 '13 at 22:01

Git allows chronologically older commits to be applied after newer commits. Because of this, the act of transferring commits between repositories is split into two steps:

  1. Copying new commits from remote branch to copy of this remote branch inside local repo.

    (repo to repo operation) master@remote >> remote/origin/master@local

  2. Integrating new commits to local branch

    (inside-repo operation) remote/origin/master@local >> master@local

There are two ways of doing step 2. You can:

  1. Fork local branch after last common ancestor and add new commits parallel to commits which are unique to local repository, finalized by merging commit, closing the fork.
  2. Insert new commits after last common ancestor and reapply commits unique to local repository.

In git terminology, step 1 is git fetch, step 2 is git merge or git rebase

git pull is git fetch and git merge

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git fetch pulls down the code from the remote server to your tracking branches. These are not your current branches, they are local copies of the branches from the server.

git pull does a git fetch but then also merges the code from the tracking branch into your current local branch. If you're not in the 'right' branch at the time this can be disastrous, so that's one reason why many of us git fetch first.

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git pull == ( git fetch + git merge)

git fetch does not changes to local branches.

If you already have a local repository with a remote set up for the desired project, you can grab all branches and tags for the existing remote using git fetch . ... Fetch does not make any changes to local branches, so you will need to merge a remote branch with a paired local branch to incorporate newly fetch changes. from github

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Git obtains the branch of the latest version from the remote to the local using two commands:

  1. git fetch: Git is going to get the latest version from remote to local, but it do not automatically merge.      git fetch origin master git log -p master..origin/master git merge origin/master

         The commands above mean that download latest version of the main branch from origin from the remote to origin master branch. And then compares the local master branch and origin master branch. Finally, merge.

  2. git pull: Git is going to get the latest version from the remote and merge into the local.

        git pull origin master

         The command above is the equivalent to git fetch and git merge. In practice, git fetch maybe more secure because before the merge we can see the changes and decide whether to merge.

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From Pro Git § 2.5 Git Basics - Working with Remotes: Fetching and Pulling from Your Remotes:

It’s important to note that the fetch command pulls the data to your local repository — it doesn’t automatically merge it with any of your work or modify what you’re currently working on. You have to merge it manually into your work when you’re ready.

If you have a branch set up to track a remote branch, you can use the git pull command to automatically fetch and then merge a remote branch into your current branch. This may be an easier or more comfortable workflow for you; and by default, the git clone command automatically sets up your local master branch to track the remote master branch on the server you cloned from (assuming the remote has a master branch). Running git pull generally fetches data from the server you originally cloned from and automatically tries to merge it into the code you’re currently working on.

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protected by Brad Larson Mar 10 '13 at 1:30

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