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What do i have to do to this code to make it compile, it's braking around this line:

auto val = what.getObject();

#include<iostream>
using namespace std;

class CUP{
    public:
        void whatsHappening(){}
};

class MUG{
    public:
        void whatsHappening(){}
};

class CupThrower{
    public:
        CUP cp;
        CUP getObject(){ return cp;}
};

class MugThrower{
    public:
        MUG mg;
        MUG getObject(){return mg;}
};

template <typename T> void whatsHappening(T what){

    auto val = what.getObject(); //DOES NOT COMPILE
    val.whatsHappening();
}

int main(){
    CupThrower ct;
    MugThrower mt;
    whatsHappening(ct);
    whatsHappening(mt);
    return 0;
}

i am using VS2008 to compile.

share|improve this question
1  
Posting the actual error that you are getting would be helpful. Also, what compiler are you using? – cake May 27 '10 at 21:04
    
i am using VS2008 , the error is too long to post – LoudNPossiblyWrong May 27 '10 at 21:07
4  
VS2008 Doesn't support auto, move to VS2010 or GCC 4.4/4.5. – AraK May 27 '10 at 21:09
1  
@Brian: Since the auto keyword in its original meaning hasn't been used in decades, the next C++ standard will recycle it giving it a new meaning. If you happen to know var in C# - that's going to be auto in C++. – sbi May 27 '10 at 21:19
4  
@Brian: Introducing new keywords always breaks some people's code. OTOH, I can't imagine that there would be code out there using auto in its original (and redundant) meaning that someone actually wants to compile using the next-generation C++ compiler. I have first seen redefining auto suggested in c.l.c++.m about a decade ago, have seen it discussed a lot since, and have never ever heard of anyone who claimed their code would break if that was done. Can you suggest any new keyword with that trait? – sbi May 27 '10 at 21:23
up vote 11 down vote accepted

Auto isn't supported in VS2008. Use VS2010 and later versions, or another compiler supporting this feature.

share|improve this answer
    
It was the compile version, i dont have vs2010 but i tried with gcc 4.4* and it worked. thanks for the tip. – LoudNPossiblyWrong May 28 '10 at 4:12

Others have said that auto isn't in VC9, which is sort-of true. auto doesn't mean in the current C++ Standard what it means in C++0x. In the current Standard, it effectively means nothing useful. Long story short, you can't use auto the way you're trying to use it here.

But there is an alternative. In this code:

template <typename T> void whatsHappening(T what){

    auto val = what.getObject(); //DOES NOT COMPILE
    val.whatsHappening();
}

...the problem you're having is val is of an unknown type. If T is CupThrower, then getObject() returns a CUP. Likewise, for MugThrower, getObject() returns a MUG. The way your code is written, you have no way to know the type returned by getObject() based solely on the type of T. So the solution is to add a way to know it. Try this:

class CupThrower{
    public:
        typedef CUP ObjectType;
        ObjectType cp;
        ObjectType getObject(){ return cp;}
};

class MugThrower{
    public:
        typedef MUG ObjectType;
        ObjectType mg;
        ObjectType getObject(){return mg;}
};

Now the type returned by getObject() is part of the enclosing class. You can change your whatsHappening() function to use this information:

template <typename T> void whatsHappening(T what){

    T::ObjectType val = what.getObject(); //DOES COMPILE!
    val.whatsHappening();
}

And all is right with the world again.

share|improve this answer
    
that's well and good but i'm trying to learn how to use implicitly typed variables with c++0x, this doesnt answer my question. – LoudNPossiblyWrong May 27 '10 at 21:25
    
Then remove the C++ tag. – John Dibling May 27 '10 at 21:26
    
You need to change that to typename T::ObjectType val = ... – R Samuel Klatchko May 27 '10 at 23:34

Auto is a feature only present in C++0x and, therefore, isn't enabled by default in most (if not all) the compilers. Have you used the appropriate options in your compiler to enable it?

share|improve this answer
    
i am using visual studio 2008 to compile, what do i have to enable to make this work? – LoudNPossiblyWrong May 27 '10 at 21:08
2  
@Loud: You have to enable "upgrade to Visual Studio 2010" :-) – James McNellis May 27 '10 at 21:09
    
actually, no. Auto is available in the C standard (and thus I'm pretty sure C++) The only thing is that it does absolutely nothing. It defines a local variable as having local scope... um... yay? – Brian Postow May 27 '10 at 21:11
2  
@Brian: Since the auto in its original form keyword hasn't been seen in the wild for decades, the next C++ standard has redefined its meaning. – sbi May 27 '10 at 21:17

It doesn't compile because you're trying to deal with zero-sized non-function objects.

Edit: Works fine for me in VS2010.

share|improve this answer
    
i'm not too sure what you mean by this. – LoudNPossiblyWrong May 27 '10 at 21:17
    
Neither am I, but I'm pretty sure this isn't the reason why your code isn't compiling. – John Dibling May 27 '10 at 21:23
    
DeadMG makes this kind of stuff up as he goes along - ignore. – anon May 27 '10 at 21:33
    
@John, it isn't the reason at all. Heck, it's not even possible to have a zero-sized object in standard C++. – CMircea May 27 '10 at 21:41
    
One of us at least attempted to post a useful suggestion. One of us just trolled. – Puppy May 28 '10 at 14:05

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