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I had an argument with a colleague about the best way to assign a variable in an if..else block. His orignal code was :

@products = if params[:category]
  Category.find(params[:category]).products
else
  Product.all
end

I rewrote it this way :

if params[:category]
  @products = Category.find(params[:category]).products
else
  @products = Product.all
end

This could also be rewritten with a one-liner using a ternery operator (? :) but let's pretend that product assignment was longer than a 100 character and couldn't fit in one line.

Which of the two is clearer to you? The first solution takes a little less space but I thought that declaring a variable and assigning it three lines after can be more error prone. I also like to see my if and else aligned, makes it easier for my brain to parse it!

share|improve this question
    
I'm not a Ruby programmer but I expect you can just stretch a ternary operator (or any) expression over multiple lines. – Bart van Heukelom May 27 '10 at 21:58
3  
What is with all the answers that start with “I'm not a Ruby programmer but…”? Okay then, don't answer the question. I know this was asked 5 years ago… but that's still well after Rails 2.0 burst into popularity. I'm honestly downvoting everything that starts with that apology upfront. – Slipp D. Thompson Apr 14 '15 at 17:21

14 Answers 14

up vote 13 down vote accepted

I don't like your use of whitespace in your first block. Yes, I'm a Pythonista, but I believe I make a fair point when I say the first might look confusing in the middle of other code, maybe around other if blocks.

How about...

@products = if params[:category] Category.find(params[:category]).products
            else                 Product.all
            end

@products = if params[:category]
              Category.find(params[:category]).products
            else                
              Product.all
            end

You could also try...

@products = Product.all #unless a category is specified:
@products = Category.find(params[:category]).products if params[:category]

...but that's a bad idea if Product.all actually is a function-like which could then be needlessly evaluated.

share|improve this answer
1  
all in this case would run a db query, so the second is not a great idea. If you were using DataMapper, all would be lazily evaluated, so this would only do one query with that framework. – BaroqueBobcat May 27 '10 at 21:59
    
TBH I find your second example less readable than the OP's first block with "wrong" whitespace (which btw is still a valid statement). – Bart van Heukelom May 27 '10 at 22:00
    
I wouldn't indent it that way (it's too far from the usual way of writing conditionals to read at a glance), but I agree that indenting it all right of the equals sign is a good idea for readability. – Chuck May 27 '10 at 22:06
    
@chuck Is this better? – badp May 27 '10 at 22:11
    
I definitely think so. That reads very clearly to me, even at a glance. – Chuck May 27 '10 at 22:17

As a Ruby programmer, I find the first clearer. It makes it clear that the whole expression is an assignment with the thing assigned being determined based on some logic, and it reduces duplication. It will look weird to people who aren't used to languages where everything is an expression, but writing your code for people who don't know the language is not that important a goal IMO unless they're specifically your target users. Otherwise people should be expected to have a passing familiarity with it.

I also agree with bp's suggestion that you could make it read more clearly by indenting the whole if-expression so that it is all visually to the right of the assignment. It's totally aesthetic, but I think that makes it more easily skimmable and should be clearer even to someone unfamiliar with the language.

Just as an aside: This sort of if is not at all unique to Ruby. It exists in all the Lisps (Common Lisp, Scheme, Clojure, etc.), Scala, all the MLs (F#, OCaml, SML), Haskell, Erlang and even Ruby's direct predecessor, Smalltalk. It just isn't common in languages based on C (C++, Java, C#, Objective-C), which is what most people use.

share|improve this answer
1  
Yeah but isn't it more error prone? Especially if over time the if..else blocks grows longer. Ruby is very permissive (dont get me started about optional parenthesis) but that does not make it always better. – Pierre Olivier Martel May 27 '10 at 21:35
3  
@Pierre: By that logic, functions must also be more error prone because they can also grow larger. Or for that matter, the line containing the assignment could also grow (I have actually seen such things). Ruby code is inherently somewhat error-prone, but I don't see how functional if-expressions are more error-prone than imperative ones. – Chuck May 27 '10 at 21:39
    
Python too :) although the syntax is sligthly different: products = Category.find(params["category"]).products() if params["category"] else Products.all() – badp May 27 '10 at 22:39

As an alternative to the syntax in badp's answer, I'd like to propose:

@products = 
  if params[:category]
    Category.find(params[:category]).products
  else
    Product.all
  end

I claim this has two advantages:

  1. Uniform indentation: each level of logical nesting is indented by exactly two spaces (OK, maybe this is just a matter of taste)
  2. Horizontal compactness: A longer variable name will not push the indented code past the 80 (or whatever) column mark

It does take an extra line of code, which I would normally dislike, but in this case it seems worthwhile to trade vertical minimalism for horizontal minimalism.

Disclaimer: this is my own idiosyncratic approach and I don't know to what extent it is used elsewhere in the Ruby community.

Edit: I should mention that matsadler's answer is also similar to this one. I do think having some indentation is helpful. I hope that's enough to justify making this a separate answer.

share|improve this answer
    
Exactly what I searched for. In most cases it's the best solution. – Anton Orel Mar 27 '13 at 6:20
    
Above all else, I love Ruby because it is beautiful and expressive, meaning I can turn ideas into software quickly, and it's actually a joy to read and operate with. This syntax exemplifies this aspect of Ruby - superb! – Steve Benner Jul 10 '14 at 3:32

encapsulation...

@products = get_products

def get_products
  if params[:category]
    Category.find(params[:category]).products
  else
    Product.all
  end
end
share|improve this answer
1  
That's clean... And it would work in most languages. – Pierre Olivier Martel May 27 '10 at 21:39
4  
If he use it only once I wouldn't recommend adding new method. – klew May 27 '10 at 21:40
    
What if the assignment to @products was the only thing that happened in the original method? Seems you're dodging the question. ;-) – molf May 27 '10 at 21:45
    
molf - if that's the case, he's got a command / query violation and should refactor the code to what i wrote. – Derick Bailey May 27 '10 at 22:03
    
nonsense. Your example would still return data to the caller in addition to changing the state of the object (and issue a database query while at it). Your refactoring doesn't change a thing. Ruby's implicit return is not your friend if you prefer strict CQS. – molf May 27 '10 at 22:24

Just another approach:

category = Category.find(params[:category]) if params[:category]
@products = category ? category.products : Product.all
share|improve this answer
    
Clean, beautiful, separated concerns. This is the kind of Ruby code I like to write & see. – Slipp D. Thompson Apr 12 '15 at 3:13
@products =
if params[:category]
  Category.find(params[:category]).products
else
  Product.all
end

Is another option, it both avoids repeating @products and keeps the if aligned with else.

share|improve this answer
1  
I've never seen this before, but it's creative! – molf May 27 '10 at 22:27

Assuming your models look like this:

class Category < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :products
end
class Product < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :category
end

you could do something even more crazy, like this:

#assuming params[:category] is an id
@products = Product.all( params[:category] ? {:conditions => { :category_id => params[:category]}} : {})

Or, you could use the sexy, lazily loaded named_scope functionality:

class Product < ActiveRecord::Base
  ...

  #again assuming category_id exists
  named_scope :all_by_category, lambda do |cat_id|
    if cat_id
      {:conditions => {:category_id => cat_id}}
    end
  end

  #if params[:category] is a name, and there is a has and belongs to many
  named_scope :all_by_category, lambda do |cat_name|
    if cat_name
      {:joins => :categories, :conditions => ["categories.name = ?",cat_name]}
    end
  end
  ...
end

used like

@products = Product.all_by_category params[:category]
share|improve this answer
    
That's a cool way to turn the problem around! But I wanted the debate to be more around the syntax than the actual functionality of the code. But I'll make good note of it! – Pierre Olivier Martel May 27 '10 at 21:58
    
of the two options you presented, I prefer the first one. – BaroqueBobcat May 27 '10 at 22:26
    
I think your named scope is confusing. I would expect Product.all_by_category(nil) to return only those products that belong to no categories, instead of all products. – molf May 27 '10 at 22:32
    
I was trying to build a named_scope that acted like Daniel Ribeiro's retrieve_products, but you are right, its behavior is confusing. My thoughts were a) I'd like the finders used to both be on the Product class, since that is what the action is about. b) I generally prefer to push as much behavior into the model as possible. – BaroqueBobcat May 27 '10 at 23:00

Yet another approach would be using a block to wrap it up.

@products = begin
  if params[:category]
    Category.find(params[:category]).products
  else
    Product.all
  end
end

which solves the assignment issue. Though, it's too many lines for such "complex" code. This approach would be useful in case that we would want to initialize the variable just once:

@products ||= begin
  if params[:category]
    Category.find(params[:category]).products
  else
    Product.all
  end
end

This is something you can't do with the rewritten code and it is correctly aligned.

share|improve this answer

First if using ternary, second if not.

The first one is near impossible to read.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes but do yo do a multiline ternary if it's too long to fit in a line? Doesn't seem right to me! – Pierre Olivier Martel May 27 '10 at 21:32
    
Why is it near impossible to read? Do you have much experience writing functional Ruby code, or is this because you're trying to read Ruby as another language? – Chuck May 27 '10 at 21:35
    
@Chuck: it is "near impossible to read" for everyone who see it for the first time. – klew May 27 '10 at 21:47
    
Near impossible to read is purely an opinion, obviously. I rarely program in Ruby (though I like it a lot), and it looks perfectly clean to me. – RHSeeger May 27 '10 at 23:12
    
One of my readability pet peeves is separating declaration from assignment when it doesn't need to be. IMHO variables should be declared as late as possible and assigned as close to their declaration as possible. Here the separation is unnecessary, and is fixed by the whitespace cleanup in the accepted answer. – Nate Noonen May 28 '10 at 0:37

I'm not a Ruby person either, but Alarm Bells are instantly ringing for scope of the second command, will that variable even be available after your if block ends?

share|improve this answer
1  
Yes, it will. It's an instance variable. – Chuck May 27 '10 at 21:27
    
+1 Good question for sure. – joeslice May 27 '10 at 21:29
1  
In ruby, if you prefix your variable with @, it makes the variable an instance variable that will be available outside the block. – Pierre Olivier Martel May 27 '10 at 21:31
    
In addition to that, Ruby does not have block scope (block in the traditional sense, if/then/else in this case). – molf May 27 '10 at 22:14

I would say that second version is more readable for people non familiar with that structure in ruby. So + for it! On the other side, first contruction is more DRY.

As I look on it a little bit longer, I find first solution more attractive. I'm a ruby programmer, but I didn't use it earlier. For sure I'll start to!

share|improve this answer

Seems to me that the second one would be more readable to the typical programmer. I'm not a ruby guy so I didn't realize that an if/else returns a value.... So, to take me as an example (and yes, that's my perspective :D), the second one seems like a good choice.

share|improve this answer
2  
You say yourself that you don't know Ruby, so why should we take you as an example? Do you write your code to cater to people who don't know any programming language and speak only Tibetan? – Chuck May 27 '10 at 21:36
    
@Chuck His “hello world” program in Ruby is probably 2000 lines long, just to make sure it's verbose enough that anyone who knows any programming or written language can understand it. You know… rather than 1 line long. – Slipp D. Thompson Apr 14 '15 at 17:26

If one is browsing through the code, I'd say the second code block (yours), is definitely the one I find easiest to quickly comprehend.

Your buddy's code is fine, but indentation, as bp pointed out, makes a world of difference in this sense.

share|improve this answer

I don't like your use of parentheses in your first block. Yes, I'm a LISP user, but I believe I make a fair point when I say the first might look confusing in the middle of other code, maybe around other if blocks.

How about...

@products = (if (params[:category])
        ((Category.find params[:category]).
            products)
    else
        (Product all)
    end
)

(^ Tongue in cheek, to exacerbate the issues with @badp's answer)

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