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In Android, onContextItemSelected has a single MenuItem argument and so it isn't clear how to identify the view selected. MenuItem.getMenuInfo provides access to Contextmenu.ContextMenuInfo, but while both known subclasses provide access to the target view, there does not appear to be an accessor on the interface.

One alternative is to save the View provided in onCreateContextMenu in a private class variable which relies on onCreateContextMenu not being called again in the activity before onContextItemSelected. Another is to use the id of the View for the itemId argument of ContextMenu.add. If we do this, we would then need to identify the option selected from the context menu by using its (possibly internationalised) title.

What is the best method for identifying the View selected in onContextSelected?

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See also: stackoverflow.com/questions/2321332/… –  Andy Johnson Mar 30 '12 at 16:19

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

There is no such concept as "identifying the View selected" for either option menus or context menus in Android. Hence, it is rather difficult to answer your question. So, I'll take some guesses.

If by "identifying the View selected" you mean which menu choice was selected, that is getItemId() on the MenuItem that is passed to onOptionsItemSelected() or onContextItemSelected().

If by "identifying the View selected" you mean which row in a ListView was the one long-tapped on to bring up the context menu, cast getMenuInfo() (called on the MenuItem) to AdapterView.AdapterContextMenuInfo, then use either the id or the position values as appropriate based on your adapter. See here for a sample project that uses this technique.

If by "identifying the View selected" you mean you have more than one non-ListView context menu in an activity, I would not use that UI technique.

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I meant the third option, that in general there could be multiple views on screen and that some of them might want to have the same context menu. Why would you not use that UI technique? –  Casebash May 30 '10 at 3:03
1  
Simple: there are no visual cues for context menus. A small percentage of Android users know to long-tap on lists for context menus. Next to nobody will bother trying to long-tap on anything else for context menus. Everything you offer via context menus needs to be offered by at least one other mechanism, just for better discoverability. Power users might find the ListView context menus, and so offering those to speed up navigation is OK. Context menus on things other than ListViews? I just wouldn't bother. –  CommonsWare May 30 '10 at 11:10
    
Good points, but you forgot to @reply me. Suppose you had to use multiple context menus. What method would you use? –  Casebash May 31 '10 at 4:34
    
@ replies have no particular impact on StackOverflow AFAICT. Again, I simply would not use multiple context menus. Assuming somebody is holding your loved ones at gunpoint, I fear that having N menu items with the same ID might confuse Android, so your 2nd option seems prone to eventual failure. The 1st option should be safer, albeit ickier from a state-management standpoint. –  CommonsWare May 31 '10 at 10:54

The whole point of a context menu is that it is associated with an individual underlying view, and it is clearly a design limitation in Android that the association is lost in the callback 'onContextItemSelected'. Enabling long-touch on any view of sufficient size seems perfectly reasonable as an alternative to a right mouse click.

As other posts have recommended, for some contexts:

AdapterView.AdapterContextMenuInfo menuInfo = 
(AdapterView.AdapterContextMenuInfo)item.getMenuInfo();

is appropriate and the targetView is a useful reference point.

Another way is to subclass the view and override 'getContextMenuInfo' to provide the view reference. For example, a simple TextView:

package ...;

public class TextViewWithContext extends TextView {
    TextViewContextMenuInfo _contextMenuInfo = null;

    public TextViewWithContext(Context context) {
        super(context);
        _contextMenuInfo = new TextViewContextMenuInfo(this);
    }

    public TextViewWithContext(Context context, AttributeSet attrs) {
        super(context, attrs);
        _contextMenuInfo = new TextViewContextMenuInfo(this);
    }   

    protected ContextMenuInfo getContextMenuInfo() {
        return _contextMenuInfo;
    }

    public boolean isContextView(ContextMenuInfo menuInfo) {
        return menuInfo == (ContextMenuInfo)_contextMenuInfo;
    }

    protected class TextViewContextMenuInfo implements ContextMenuInfo {
        protected TextView  _textView = null;

        protected TextViewContextMenuInfo(TextView textView) {
            _textView = textView;
        }
    }
}

...
    @Override
    public boolean onContextItemSelected(MenuItem item) {   

        ContextMenuInfo menuInfo = item.getMenuInfo();

        if (textViewWithContext.isContextView(menuInfo) {
            ...
        }
    }

Finally, it would have been more helpful if the base View class had assigned a ContextInfo object with a reverse reference to the view, rather than null as at present.

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I've prepared sample app using this approach: ogrelab.ikratko.com/… –  Ogre_BGR Jul 12 '11 at 20:08

class TestActivity extends Activity {

// create temp item here

private ImageView tmpImageView = null;

...

public void onCreateContextMenu(ContextMenu menu, View v, ContextMenuInfo menuInfo){
    super.onCreateContextMenu(menu, v, menuInfo);
    // initialize temp item
    mCurrentStatusImage = (ImageView) v.findViewById(R.id.rule_status);
}

public boolean onContextItemSelected(MenuItem item) {
    switch (item.getItemId()) {
        case ENABLE_ID:
            // use temp item
            tmpImageView.setImageResource(android.R.drawable.presence_online);
            return super.onContextItemSelected(item);
        case DISABLE_ID:
            // use temp item
            tmpImageView.setImageResource(android.R.drawable.presence_invisible);
            return super.onContextItemSelected(item);
        default:    
            return super.onContextItemSelected(item);
 }
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I fixed a similar problem by setting a groupID for the MenuItem based on which item sent it e.g:

    textview.setOnCreateContextMenuListener(new View.OnCreateContextMenuListener() {
        @Override
        public void onCreateContextMenu(ContextMenu menu, View view, ContextMenu.ContextMenuInfo contextMenuInfo) {
                menu.setHeaderTitle("Context Menu");
                menu.add(R.id.whateverviewclicked, RENAME_MENU_ITEM, 0, "Rename");
                menu.add(R.id.whateverviewclicked, DELETE_MENU_ITEM, 1, "Delete");
             }
         });

This would allow you to get the groupID in the onContextItemSelected:

public boolean onContextItemSelected(MenuItem aItem) {
        int selectedViewID = aItem.getGroupId();
        int selectedItem = aItem.getItemId();
};

you don't have to use the resource ID - you can use any int you want. Works for me!

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In case you are attaching ContextMenus to multiple Views which are NOT in a ListView (that is there is no adapter underlying the Views) and you wish to determine which View was long-pressed to access the ContextMenu the following "hack" can be implemented. (It would be better if Android provided a listener that could be associated with each item).

The "hack" is that one creates a private View member mLastViewTouched in the class and then attach the following onTouchListener to all Views that can generate a ContextMenu:

 private View.OnTouchListener onTouchListener = new View.OnTouchListener() {
    @Override
    public boolean onTouch(View view, MotionEvent motionEvent)
    {
        mLastViewTouched = view;        // Store a handle on the last view touched. This will be used to identify the view on which the Context Menu was launched

        return false;       // We return false since this indicates that the touch was not handled and so it is passed down the stack to be handled appropriately
    }
};

So whenever a View is touched mLastViewTouched is updated. Now in onContextItemSelected you will have access to the View that initiated the ContextMenu.

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