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Unlike C++, in C# you can't overload the assignment operator.

I'm doing a custom Number class for arithmetic operations with very large numbers and I want it to have the look-and-feel of the built-in numerical types like int, decimal, etc. I've overloaded the arithmetic operators, but the assignment remains...

Here's an example:

Number a = new Number(55); 
Number b = a; //I want to copy the value, not the reference

Is there a workaround for that issue?

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2  
Explain the issue (why you need it). –  Shog9 Nov 15 '08 at 15:37
    
Sorry, maybe I should've been more specific. I'm doing a custom Number class for arithmetic operations with very large numbers and I want it to have the look-and-feel of the built-in numerical types like int, decimal, etc. I've overloaded the arithmetic operators, but the assignment remains... –  Jon Galloway Nov 15 '08 at 16:13
    
Thanks - i've added your comment to the question itself. –  Shog9 Nov 15 '08 at 16:15
1  
Here's an example: Number a = new Number(55); Number b = a; And I want it to copy the value, not the reference. –  Jon Galloway Nov 15 '08 at 16:21
1  
Look at DateTime and TimeSpan. Plenty of methods there. If it's effectively an atomic value, then it should probably be a struct. Numbers almost always fall into this category. –  Jon Skeet Nov 15 '08 at 17:10

6 Answers 6

up vote 13 down vote accepted

It's still not at all clear to me that you really need this. Either:

  • Your Number type should be a struct (which is probable - numbers are the most common example of structs). Note that all the types you want your type to act like (int, decimal etc) are structs.

or:

  • Your Number type should be immutable, making every mutation operation return a new instance, in which case you don't need the data to be copied on assignment anyway. (In fact, your type should be immutable whether or not it's a struct. Mutable structs are evil, and a number certainly shouldn't be a mutable reference type.)
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Yes, maybe the struct idea is good. And I like the immutability option - it was suggested in another answer. Thanks, I'll try what you propose. –  Jon Galloway Nov 15 '08 at 17:03
1  
Mutable structs might be evil but the C# team thought they were ok for Enumerators. I think it's more correct to say it as a general rule. –  Vince Panuccio May 16 '11 at 4:57
1  
Mutability is not evil, if you can prevent object sharing. This can be done by implementing linear types which requires some form of assignment overloading. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linear_type_system. –  cdiggins Apr 13 '12 at 15:30

you can use the 'implicit' keyword to create an overload for the assignment:

Suppose you have a type like Foo, that you feel is implicitly convertable from a string. You would write the following static method in your Foo class:

public static implicit operator Foo(string normalString)
{
    //write your code here to go from string to Foo and return the new Foo.
}

Having done that, you can then use the following in your code:

Foo x = "whatever";
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2  
Cool, this answers a question I was going ot ask ;) –  Sam Salisbury Apr 20 '10 at 14:35
3  
Doesn't that only work if you are trying to assign one type to another? It's an implicit cast, after all. I don't think that would help if you wanted to assign Number to Number. –  Drew Noakes Jun 5 '10 at 6:51
    
@Jonathan Wood - That was exactly what i was looking for! Much appreciated! –  Steven Magana-Zook Jun 10 '11 at 23:45
    
@drew-noakes: If you want to assign Number to Number, and Number is a struct, you get the desired effect with the default assignment operator anyway: Assign by value. –  Nilzor Aug 3 '11 at 11:21
    
@Nilzor, in such a case you get a copy of the value as you say, but the OP wants to control that process somehow with their own code. I don't think that's possible unless you're adapting between two types. So it's slightly different to what you can do in C++. –  Drew Noakes Aug 3 '11 at 11:44

You won't be able to work around it having the C++ look, since a = b; has other semantics in C++ than in C#. In C#, a = b; makes a point to the same object like b. In C++, a = b changes the content of a. Both has their ups and downs. It's like you do

MyType * a = new MyType();
MyType * b = new MyType(); 
a = b; /* only exchange pointers. will not change any content */

In C++ (it will lose the reference to the first object, and create a memory leak. But let's ignore that here). You cannot overload the assign operator in C++ for that either.

The workaround is easy:

MyType a = new MyType();
MyType b = new MyType();

// instead of a = b
a.Assign(b);

Disclaimer: I'm not a C# developer

You could create a write-only-property like this. then do a.Self = b; above.

public MyType Self {
    set {
        /* copy content of value to this */
        this.Assign(value);
    }
}

Now, this is not good. Since it violates the principle-of-least-surprise (POLS). One wouldn't expect a to change if one does a.Self = b;

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Maybe I could do it that way. But what I meant was - a workaround that gives me the real look-and-feel of assignment operator overloading, so I ca literally say: MyType a = new MyType(); MyType b = new MyType(); a = b; and it performs some custom assignment logic. –  Jon Galloway Nov 15 '08 at 15:54
    
The description of why it doesn't work is spot-on. As you suggest, though, the Self property idea is not so good, –  Charlie Nov 15 '08 at 16:09
    
"In C++, a = b changes the content of a." - thats not entirely correct. it depends on whether a and b are pointers or not. a=b could make a point to b or it could call your = overload and copy the contents to a. –  Micky Duncan Feb 22 '12 at 9:47
    
@MickyDuncan Eh.. it is entirely correct. What do you think the content of a and b IS if they are pointers? In what sense does "only copying the pointer" differ from "copying the content" when the content IS a pointer? –  The Dag Nov 6 '12 at 10:32
    
@TheDag c++ = assignment can either make a pointer point to the same object OR change the contents depending on the variable type. One did not establish we were talking about just pointers –  Micky Duncan Nov 7 '12 at 2:54

Instead of making a copy of the data when passing the reference you could make the class immutable. When the class is immutable having multiple references to it isn't a problem since it can't be changed.

Operations that changes the data would of course return new instances.

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Now that's a good idea! Thanks, I'll try it! –  Jon Galloway Nov 15 '08 at 16:43

An earlier post suggested this:

public static implicit operator Foo(string normalString) { }

I tried this approach... but to make it work you need this:

public static implicit operator Foo(Foo original) { }

and the compiler won't let you have an implicit conversion function from your exact type, nor from any base type of yourself. That makes sense since it would be a backdoor way of overriding the assignment operator, which C# doesn't want to allow.

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"The implicit keyword is used to declare an implicit user-defined type conversion operator. Use it to enable implicit conversions between a user-defined type and another type, ..." - MSDN –  Micky Duncan Feb 22 '12 at 9:50

Maybe what you're looking for can be solved using C# accessors.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa287786(v=vs.71).aspx

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