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what are virtual functions? what is pure virtual function? please explain with example

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closed as not a real question by Paŭlo Ebermann, Sean Vieira, ρяσѕρєя K, Michael Myers Oct 2 '12 at 20:53

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17  
please at least try searching yourself first... –  Mitch Wheat May 28 '10 at 5:41
1  
That's C++ terminology. –  starblue May 28 '10 at 5:52
    
@starblue: I think they are generally referred to as abstract in C# and Java. You say tomato, i say tomato (doesn't quite work in text form). –  R0MANARMY May 28 '10 at 5:56
    
No. Java 'abstract' = C++ 'pure virtual'. In Java all instance methods are virtual. –  EJP May 28 '10 at 6:06
3  
@R0MANARMY: 'You write color, I write colour' works better in text... ;) –  Sani Huttunen May 28 '10 at 6:11

2 Answers 2

There's an excellent explanation on wikipedia.

Difference between a virtual function and a pure virtual function is that a virtual function has an implementation and you have the option to override it. A pure virtual function (abstract in Java) has no implementation and you have to implement it in a subclass (unless your subclass is also abstract).

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I thought that in C++, a virtual function of a derived class will be called even if it is typed as a base class. Is that correct? –  dreamlax May 28 '10 at 7:53
1  
Pure virtual functions can have implementations. They remain pure, so you still have to provide another implementation in a derived class. But you can call them if you explicitly state you want the base version. –  Dennis Zickefoose May 28 '10 at 8:01
    
@dreamlax: That's the idea behind polymorphism, yes. –  R0MANARMY May 28 '10 at 11:30
/**
Virtual Function : A virtual function is a member function that is declared
within a base class and redefined by a derived class.

A base class pointer can be used to point an object of any class derived from
that base. When a base pointer points to a derived object that contains a 
virtual function, C++ determines which version of that function to call based
upon the type of object pointed by the pointer.

*/

#include < iostream >
using namespace std;

class baseclass 
{
    public :
    virtual void vfunc() { cout << "This is base class vfunc\n"; };
};

class derived : public baseclass {
    public :
    void vfunc() { cout << "This is derived class vfunc\n"; };
};

class derived2 : public baseclass {};

int main () 
{
    class baseclass * ptr, b;   // baseclass pointer and its object
    class derived d;        // object of derived class
    class derived2 d2;      // object of derived2 class
    ptr = &b;           // ptr points to baseclass
    ptr->vfunc();       // vfunc of base class will execute
    ptr = &d;           // ptr points to derived class
    ptr->vfunc();       // vfunc of derived class will execute
    ptr = &d2;      // ptr points to derived2 class
    ptr->vfunc();       // vfunc of base class will execute
    return 0;
}    

******************************************************************************

/*
In a Pure Virtual Function, base class have no definition of virtual function
*/

#include < iostream >
using namespace std;

class baseclass 
{
    public :
    virtual void vfunc() = 0 ;  // Pure virtual function
};

class derived : public baseclass {
    public :
    void vfunc() { cout << "This is derived class vfunc\n"; };
};

class derived2 : public baseclass {
    public :
    void vfunc() { cout << "This is derived2 class vfunc\n"; };
};

int main () 
{
    class derived d;        // object of derived class
    class derived2 d2;      // object of derived2 class
    d.vfunc();      // vfunc of derived class will execute
    d2.vfunc();     // vfunc of derived2 class will execute
    return 0;
}
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