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First a bit of background: I have a WPF application, which is a GUI-front-end to a legacy Win32-application. The legacy app runs as DLL in a separate thread. The commands the user chooses in the UI are invoked on that "legacy thread".

If the "legacy thread" finishes, the GUI-front-end cannot do anything useful anymore, so I need to shutdown the WPF-application. Therefore, at the end of the thread's method, I call Application.Current.Shutdown().

Since I am not on the main thread, I need to invoke this command. However, then I noticed that the Dispatcher also has BeginInvokeShutdown() to shutdown the dispatcher. So my question is: What is the difference between invoking

Application.Current.Shutdown();

and calling

Application.Current.Dispatcher.BeginInvokeShutdown();
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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I did some more testing, and now I think I know the differences:

1) As stated in the MSDN page, BeginInvokeShutdown, besides shutting down the Dispatcher, also clears/aborts its queue. Shutdown first handles all items in the Dispatcher queue.

Once the shutdown process begins, all pending work items in the queue are aborted.

2) In an application I can handle the Application.Exit event. This event is fired when I call Shutdown, but NOT fired when I call BeginInvokeShutdown! The same applies to Window.Closing and Window.Closed.

As for similarities, in both cases the main thread is exited. Depending on other running threads, this also shuts down the process: non-background threads are run to completion before the process exits.

Below is my test code. Comment one or the other method call in Application_Startup:

public partial class App
{
    private void Application_Exit(object sender, ExitEventArgs e)
    {
        MessageBox.Show("Exiting");
    }

    private void Application_Startup(object sender, StartupEventArgs e)
    {
        var testThread = new Thread(
            () =>
            {
                Thread.Sleep(2000);
                Application.Current.Dispatcher.BeginInvokeShutdown(System.Windows.Threading.DispatcherPriority.Send);
                //Application.Current.Dispatcher.BeginInvoke(new Action(() => Application.Current.Shutdown()));
            });
        testThread.Start();
    }
}

public partial class Window1
{
    public Window1()
    {
        this.InitializeComponent();

        Dispatcher.BeginInvoke(new Action(() =>
        {
            Thread.Sleep(1000);
            Console.WriteLine("One");
        }));

        Dispatcher.BeginInvoke(new Action(() =>
        {
            Thread.Sleep(1000);
            Console.WriteLine("Two");
        }));

        Dispatcher.BeginInvoke(new Action(() =>
        {
            Thread.Sleep(1000);
            Console.WriteLine("Three");
        }));

        Dispatcher.BeginInvoke(new Action(() =>
        {
            Thread.Sleep(1000);
            Console.WriteLine("Four");
        }));
    }

    private void Window_Closed(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Closed");
    }

    private void Window_Closing(object sender, System.ComponentModel.CancelEventArgs e)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Closing");
    }
}
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MSDN page for Shutdown()
MSDN page for BeginInvokeShutdown()

It seems that this is just a collision of terminology. BeginInvokeShutdown shuts down that dispatcher, your application can in theory continue to live afterwards (though without a dispatcher, it'd be pretty limited). Shutdown however actually exits your application, which is what you want.

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Well, that is precicely the question which isn't answered in the documentation: Does shutting down the application's dispatcher also shut down the application? –  Daniel Rose May 28 '10 at 14:15
    
I built a simple WPF test application for this. To simulate your code, I did: Thread t = new Thread(new ThreadStart(delegate() { Thread.Sleep(50000); })); t.Start(); Application.Current.Dispatcher .BeginInvokeShutdown(System.Windows.Threading.DispatcherPriority.Normal);. The Dispatcher shutdown killed its owner thread and closed the window, but did not kill the background thread. –  JustABill May 28 '10 at 17:12
    
Two small differences: 1) I call shutdown in the second thread (though through testing I can see that it makes no difference). 2) I have the second thread set as background thread (IsBackground = true). That way, it also gets killed if the main thread quits. –  Daniel Rose May 31 '10 at 8:08

By the way, Daniel - our application is built in the same way - WPF front-end to a Win32 COM (Delphi) application running separately. It would be interesting to talk and compare our approaches.

But why I have stumbled upon your question is that our application used to call Dispatcher.BeginInvokeShutdown, which worked fine with exception of a few cases where it did not terminate properly. When I finally got my hands on a machine on which this was reproducible, switching to Application.Current.Shutdown() fixed the problem. I still do not understand what was the problem.

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I'd guess that is because the call to Dispatcher.BeginInvokeShutdown() aborts/clears any pending messages. In my case, I also do a bunch of cleanup in the Window.Closing/Closed cases and Application.Exit (to shutdown the Win32 part). –  Daniel Rose Apr 28 '11 at 6:58

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