Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How to double a number of binary digits in an integer? For example, if bin(x)="1001" then bin(y) must be "11000011". Is there any smart and fast algorithm ?

UPDATE: Here is an elegant solution:

''.join([''.join(i) for i in zip(X,X)])

where X is bin(int_x)[2:]

However, I am interested in a more faster way and for the integers of any size. Maybe an arithmetical transformation should help.

share|improve this question
    
@Daniel Trebbien: thanks for the clarification. My mistake. –  dnagirl May 28 '10 at 12:42
    
What should the output be for non-symmetric input, e.g. should input of 8 (b1000) give 3 (b00000011) or 192 (b11000000)? –  Niall C. May 28 '10 at 12:42
1  
If the input is b0 + 2*b1 + 4*b2 + 8*b3 + ... then I think that @psihodelia wants b0 + 2*b0 + 4*b1 + 8*b1 + 16*b2 + 32*b2 + ... –  Daniel Trebbien May 28 '10 at 12:49
7  
Use INTERCAL - it's one of the basic operators. DO :1 <- :1¢:1 –  Mike Seymour May 28 '10 at 13:02
1  
For elegency, what about ''.join(chain(*zip(X, X)))? Remember to from itertools import chain. :] –  Xavier Ho May 28 '10 at 13:25

7 Answers 7

up vote 20 down vote accepted

Here's one way that should be reasonably fast: convert your number to a binary string, then reinterpret the result as being in base 4. Now to make sure that all the '1's are doubled properly, multiply the result by 3.

>>> x = 9
>>> bin(x)
'0b1001'
>>> y = int(bin(x)[2:], 4)*3
>>> bin(y)
'0b11000011'
share|improve this answer
    
Very cool method! –  psihodelia May 28 '10 at 13:18
1  
Nice one! Took me some time to get it. –  Xavier Ho May 28 '10 at 13:26
2  
+1 for very cool method. –  Max May 28 '10 at 13:50

(Reference http://graphics.stanford.edu/~seander/bithacks.html#Interleave64bitOps):

If your number is below 256, you may use

@magic
def double_digits_holger8(x):
    m = (x * 0x0101010101010101 & 0x8040201008040201) * 0x0102040810204081
    return ((m >> 49) & 0x5555) | ((m >> 48) & 0xAAAA)

and if it is below 65536,

@more_magic
def double_digits_binmag16(x):
    x = (x | x << 8) & 0x00FF00FF
    x = (x | x << 4) & 0x0F0F0F0F
    x = (x | x << 2) & 0x33333333
    x = (x | x << 1) & 0x55555555
    return x | x << 1

Comparison with other solutions (the function must take an integer and return an integer for fair comparison):

Method        Time per 256 calls
--------------------------------
Do nothing        46.2 usec 
Holger8          256   usec
BinMag16         360   usec
Mark             367   usec # http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2928886/doubling-binary-digits/2929198#2929198
Max              720   usec # http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2928886/doubling-binary-digits/2928938#2928938
Peter          1.08    msec # http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2928886/doubling-binary-digits/2928973#2928973
Phiµµ w/o Log  1.11    msec # http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2928886/doubling-binary-digits/2929106#2929106
Jim16          1.26    msec # http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2928886/doubling-binary-digits/2929038#2929038
Elegant        1.66    msec # int(''.join([''.join(i) for i in zip(X,X)]),2)
More Elegant   2.05    msec # int(''.join(chain(*zip(X, X))), 2)

Benchmark source code can be found in http://gist.github.com/417172.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for more magic. You can get rid of some of the semi-colons. ;p –  Xavier Ho May 28 '10 at 13:40
    
I am interested more in an universal method for the long integers of any size. –  psihodelia May 28 '10 at 13:44
    
Is there any specific reason to use the "magic" and "more_magic" decorators? Looking at your code, they seem to just pass the function (value) along without actually doing anything to it. Am I wrong in thinking that you might as well just have "magic" and "more_magic" be comments? –  JAB May 28 '10 at 13:45
    
@JAB: I just ported code.google.com/p/gag to Python :p –  kennytm May 28 '10 at 13:48
    
@KennyTM: Ah, I see. Thanks for the link. I think I'll keep it bookmarked. –  JAB May 28 '10 at 13:56

The straightforward solution just using integer arithmetic would be:

def doubledigits(n):
    result = 0
    power = 1
    while n > 0:
        if n%2==1:
            result += 3*power
        power *= 4
        n //= 2
    return result
share|improve this answer
    
It's much less elegant than using string (more code), but would also probably be much faster (especially as it's easily portable to c). –  Matthieu M. May 28 '10 at 13:50
    
@Matthieu: It is faster only if it is really written in C. –  kennytm May 28 '10 at 14:56
    
Probably (I haven't benchmarked it) since hand-loops are notoriously slow in python in comparison to the built-in operations. –  Matthieu M. May 28 '10 at 15:13
1  
I have say, I dispute the idea that "elegant" equals "less code". That's a dangerous way to think. Conciseness is not necessarily the same thing as clarity. (That said, Mark Dickinson's answer is excellent.) –  Peter Milley May 28 '10 at 21:30

any_number - int

str(n) - produces string from int.

str::replace(pattern, replaced_value) - replaces all patterns in string to replaced_value.

int(str) - makes int from string.

n=any_number
result_number = int(str(n).replace("0","00").replace("1","11"))
share|improve this answer
1  
you call it fast? –  Andrey May 28 '10 at 12:30
2  
At least it is a solution. –  Xavier Ho May 28 '10 at 12:39
    
I am not sure it is fast, but it is ellegant. didn't notice it in question, but I commonly use python when I don't mind about speed. Anyway, why this shouldn't be fast? str::replace method replaces all entries in one traversal. So here are two traversals, 2 is only constant, the complexity is still O(N) –  Max May 28 '10 at 12:41
2  
you could double any string like this ''.join([c*2 for c in str(n)]) –  Nick Dandoulakis May 28 '10 at 12:57
3  
IMO, Max's solution is the most elegant. I don't see a need to use complicated function for this, unless the use case warrants. –  Xavier Ho May 28 '10 at 13:00
$ python2.6
Python 2.6.5 (r265:79063, Mar 25 2010, 14:13:28)
>>> def dd(n): return eval("0b" + "".join(d * 2 for d in str(bin(n))[2:]))
...
>>> dd(9)
195
share|improve this answer
1  
I know eval is evil, if you don't need to convert the result to decimal, you don't need it. –  grokus May 28 '10 at 13:16
    
you don't need to use eval at all. eval("0b" + ...) is the same as int(..., 2) –  user102008 Mar 31 '11 at 19:50
y = 0;
for(i = 15; i  >= 0; i--) {
    if((1 << i) & x) {
       y |= 3;
    }
    y <<= 2;
}
share|improve this answer
def doubledigits(x):
    from math import log
    print (bin(x))
    numdigits = x.bit_length()
    result = 1 << (numdigits*2)
    for i in range(numdigits, -1, -1):
        mask = 1 << i
        if (x & mask > 0):
            rmask = 0b11 << (2*i)
            result = result | rmask
    return result

should do it.

share|improve this answer
    
Compare this solution to Peter Milley's solution above. Which one is nicer? –  unbeli May 28 '10 at 13:06
    
Doesn't work for x = 0. Just use x.bit_length() instead of log. –  kennytm May 28 '10 at 13:54
    
@unbeli compare your comment to the others on this question - which is nicer? :P hey, as far as i'm concerned, at least he gave a working solution! –  Jeriko May 28 '10 at 16:45

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.