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in order to dynamically create a form, i have to find the property types of a model's properties at runtime.

appengine docs says that Model.properties() will return a dictionary of properties name and their class type. when i use this method in my code, only the name is returned and the classtype value is always empty.

share|improve this question
    
.properties() does return a dict - but when you iterate over a dict in Python, it iterates over the keys only. – Nick Johnson May 28 '10 at 21:58
    
yes i know. wasn't the issue. thanks for replying. – victor n. May 29 '10 at 20:05
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Model.kind()

E.g., for a model like this:

class LargeTextList(db.Model):
    large_text_list = db.ListProperty(item_type=db.Text)

my_model_instance.kind() returns LargeTextList.


Edit (thanks to OP for clarification):
The property information you seek is there, but you'll need to escape to see it, e.g. in your template:

<p>{{ my_model_instance.properties|escape }}</p>

This returns:

{'large_text_list': <google.appengine.ext.db.ListProperty object at 0x24b1790>}

Edit2:
You can also call properties() on the class itself:

my_model = LargeTextList

and in the template as before (be sure to use the escape filter):

<p>{{ model.properties|escape }}</p>
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the reply. i'm not looking for the kind. but for instance in your example, that large_text_list is a ListProperty. that's what i'm looking for. – victor n. May 28 '10 at 15:54
    
@python: thanks for the clarification; see edit. – bernie May 28 '10 at 15:57
    
exactly what i'm doing. does it have to be on an instance? i'm only getting the keys in my properties dict. – victor n. May 28 '10 at 16:00
    
No, doesn't need to be an instance. You can call the kind() method on the class itself as well. I'll add that as another example in case it helps. – bernie May 28 '10 at 16:04
    
weird, it is not working on my side. – victor n. May 28 '10 at 16:10

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