Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Why can't you throw an InterruptedException in the following way:

try {
    System.in.wait(5) //Just an example
} catch (InterruptedException exception) {
    exception.printStackTrace();
 //On this next line I am confused as to why it will not let me throw the exception
    throw exception;
}

I went to http://java24hours.com, but it didn't tell me why I couldn't throw an InterruptedException.
If anyone knows why, PLEASE tell me! I'm desperate! :S

share|improve this question
    
What kind of error do you get? –  Simon May 28 '10 at 17:31
    
It says: unreported exception java.lang.InterruptedException; must be caught or declared to be thrown –  fireshadow52 May 28 '10 at 23:57

3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted

You can only throw it if the method you're writing declares that it throws InterruptedException (or a base class).

For example:

public void valid() throws InterruptedException {
  try {
    System.in.wait(5) //Just an example
  } catch (InterruptedException exception) {
    exception.printStackTrace();
    throw exception;
  }
}

// Note the lack of a "throws" clause.
public void invalid() {
  try {
    System.in.wait(5) //Just an example
  } catch (InterruptedException exception) {
    exception.printStackTrace();
    throw exception;
  }
}

You should read up on checked exceptions for more details.

(Having said this, calling wait() on System.in almost certainly isn't doing what you expect it to...)

share|improve this answer
    
@Downvoter: Care to explain? –  Jon Skeet May 28 '10 at 17:34
    
Or, he could deal with the exception in the catch block. Anyway, good explanation of how exceptions work. –  amphetamachine May 28 '10 at 17:38
    
Thanks a LOT! That really helped :D –  fireshadow52 May 28 '10 at 23:53

There are two kinds of exceptions in Java: checked and unchecked exceptions.

For checked exceptions, the compiler checks if your program handles them, either by catching them or by specifying (with a throws clause) that the method in which the exception might happen, that the method might throw that kind of exception.

Exception classes that are subclasses of java.lang.RuntimeException (and RuntimeException itself) are unchecked exceptions. For those exceptions, the compiler doesn't do the check - so you are not required to catch them or to specify that you might throw them.

Class InterruptedException is a checked exception, so you must either catch it or declare that your method might throw it. You are throwing the exception from the catch block, so you must specify that your method might throw it:

public void invalid() throws InterruptedException {
    // ...

Exception classes that extend java.lang.Exception (except RuntimeException and subclasses) are checked exceptions.

See Sun's Java Tutorial about exceptions for detailed information.

share|improve this answer
    
It may be worth mentioning that you can also throw instances of non-Exception classes derived from Throwable. These are exceptions but not Exceptions :) –  Jon Skeet May 28 '10 at 17:41
    
@Jon, yes, but that's a more advanced subject that goes beyond what the poster asks, I didn't want to make this a complete course on exceptions in Java... –  Jesper May 28 '10 at 17:45

InterruptedException is not a RuntimeException so it must be caught or checked (with a throws clause on the method signature). You can only throw a RuntimeException and not be forced by the compiler to catch it.

share|improve this answer
    
Well, not quite - you can declare that you're going to throw it to force the caller to catch or rethrow it. –  Jon Skeet May 28 '10 at 17:35
    
I mentioned that in the first sentence, my second sentence should read "... and not be forced by the compiler to 'handle' it." That would have been more clear. –  Matthew J Morrison May 28 '10 at 17:52

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.