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#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <iostream>
#include <string.h>
using namespace std;
int main()
{
        string cmd;
        while(strcmp(cmd.c_str(),"exit")==0 && strcmp(cmd.c_str(),"\exit")==0)
        {
                cin>>cmd;
                cout<<cmd;
        }
        return 0;
}

I am stuck.

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1  
It's better to paste the code directly in the question –  Brian R. Bondy May 28 '10 at 18:55
    
@Brian: I went and did that. –  sbi May 28 '10 at 18:55
    
Also, it's cleaner if you use cmd.compare("exit") instead of strcmp(cms,c_str(),"exit")==0 You are writing C++ code. Why not take advantage of it? –  Vagrant May 28 '10 at 19:04
1  
STL provides operator== for const char*, why not use that? –  Stephen May 28 '10 at 19:08
    
@Stephen: Actually, std::string isn't from that part of the standard library which evolved from the STL. Otherwise you're certainly right. –  sbi May 28 '10 at 20:47

6 Answers 6

up vote 8 down vote accepted

After fixing a couple of small bugs, this works on my machine:

#include <cstdlib>
#include <cstdio>
#include <iostream>
#include <cstring>
#include <string>

int main()
{
        std::string cmd;
        while( std::strcmp(cmd.c_str(),"exit")!=0
            && std::strcmp(cmd.c_str(),"\\exit")!=0)
        {
                std::cin>>cmd;
                std::cout<<cmd << '\n';
        }
        return 0;
}

However, I wonder why you want to use std::strcmp() at all. As you have just found out, it's not as easy to use as the std::string class. This

while(cmd!="exit" && cmd!="\\exit")

works just as well, is easier to understand, and thus easier to get right.

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The OP may want to convert the input string to lowercase before comparing. This allows user to type in "Exit" as well as "exit". The terms to research are: std::transform and tolower. –  Thomas Matthews May 28 '10 at 19:35

strcmp returns 0 when they are equal. So I think you want != 0

Surely strcmp won't return 0 for both, because it can't be equal to both.

Also it looks like you have a backslash at the start of your string, you should escape that with a double backslash.

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A std::string instance can be compared directly with a string literal using != or == operators. This makes your comparison clearer.

Note that \e isn't a valid character escape, you need to double the \ if you meant a literal \\.

while( cmd == "exit" && cmd == "\\exit" )

Obviously cmd can't be equal to two different strings at the same time, presumably you meant !=.

Also, consider whether std::getline( std::cin, cmd ) is more appropriate than std::cin >> cmd;. In either case you should check for success of the read operation otherwise you may end in an infinite loop if the stream is closed or enters a failed state.

Personally I'd go with something like this, assuming that you want to echo the exit command as your code does.

#include <string>
#include <iostream>
#include <ostream>

int main()
{
    std::string cmd;
    while (std::getline(std::cin, cmd))
    {
        std::cout << cmd << std::endl;
        if (cmd == "exit" || cmd == "\\exit")
            break;
    }
    return 0;
}
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The condition in your while will never evaluate to true because you're testing to check the cmd string is equal to "exit" and "\\exit". One string can never be equals to two values at the same time.

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Your problem are the while conditions.

You probably would want do exit the loop when the user enters exit, so you should use:

while(strcmp(cmd.c_str(),"exit")!=0 && strcmp(cmd.c_str(),"\exit")!=0)
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Just a few things to keep in mind, i am reiterating some of the suggestions that are worth repeating while(1) times.

  1. You are using C++, it is object oriented, i.e., Its best to combine together the data and the function that works on it. In this case use the string compare options provided by string class rather than strcmp.

  2. There is a logic error in your program, well it will compile, but i am afraid thats not what you want. if ( a == x && a == y ) this will always be false, as a cannot be both equal to x and y unless x=y, in your case clearly x!=y.

Cheers, Pavan

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