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Is there a better way to write the following conditional in javascript?

if ( value == 1 || value == 16 || value == -500 || value == 42.42 || value == 'something' ) {
  // blah blah blah
}

I hate having all of those logical ORs strung together. I'm wondering if there is some kind of shorthand.

Thanks!

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7 Answers 7

up vote 5 down vote accepted
var a = [1, 16, -500, 42.42, 'something'];
var value = 42;
if (a.indexOf(value) > -1){
// blah blah blah
}

Upd: Utility function sample as proposed in comments:

Object.prototype.in = function(){
  for(var i = 0; i < arguments.length; i++){
    if (this == arguments[i]) return true;
  }
  return false;
}

So you can write:

if (value.in(1, 16, -500, 42.42, 'something')){
// blah blah blah
}
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7  
Just be aware that the Array.prototype.indexOf method is not available on IE. –  CMS May 28 '10 at 20:15
1  
@CMS Thanks for a valuable notice. Though, can be fixed at once. stackoverflow.com/questions/1744310/… –  Li0liQ May 28 '10 at 20:18
4  
I'd strongly recommend against prototyping onto Object. Apart from the widespread nature of the namespace pollution, there is a high risk of breaking code that uses Objects as lookup mappings. Better to put this kind of utility method onto the Array.prototype. Also that allows you to use the method against things that do not inherit from Object, namely ‘host objects’ like DOM Nodes. –  bobince May 28 '10 at 21:43
2  
Don't modify objects you don't own, specially Object.prototype! –  CMS May 28 '10 at 22:20
1  
@Li0liQ, by the way, in is a reserved word, because it's a Keyword. It shouldn't be used as identifier... –  CMS May 29 '10 at 17:08

You could extend the array object:

Array.prototype.contains = function(obj) {
  var i = this.length;
  while (i--) {
    if (this[i] == obj) {
      return true;
    }
  }
  return false;
}

Then if you store all those values in an array you could do something like MyValues.contains(value)

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If type coercion is not expected, I would recommend using === instead ==, however IMO, with this approach, the best thing is to use the standard Array.prototype.indexOf method, as @Li0liQ mentions, is available natively on all browsers except IE. –  CMS May 28 '10 at 20:24
    
I'm no javascript pro - good to know. Thanks –  Prescott May 28 '10 at 20:28

nope, that is the shorthand.

as an alternative, you can do a switch

switch (value) {
case 1 :
case 16 :
case -500 :
    ....
}

which is easier to manage if you need a lot of possible values, but actually your version is shorter anyway :)

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If it's mixed you can cast value to a string and do string compares. Slower but possible. I also think this option is more .. readable than the indexOf option presented. –  Matt S May 28 '10 at 20:16
    
oh you're right, i thought it was java not javascript :) –  oedo May 28 '10 at 20:17

switch is an acceptable choice. You can also use a map, depending on the complexity of the problem (assuming you have more than you put in your example).

var accept = { 1: true, 16: true, '-500': true, 42.42: true, something: true };
if (accept[value]) {
  // blah blah blah
}

accept could be generated progamatically from an array of course. Depends really on how much you plan on using this pattern. :/

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Well, you could use a switch statement...

switch (value) {
  case 1    : // blah
              break;
  case 16   : // blah
              break;
  case -500 : // blah
              break;
  case 42.42: // blah
              break;
  case "something" : // blah
                     break;
}

If you're using JavaScript 1.6 or greater, you can use the indexOf notation on an array:

if ([1, 16, -500, 42.42, "something"].indexOf(value) !== -1) {
   // blah
}

And for the ultimate in hackiness, you can coerce the values to strings (this works for all browsers):

if ("1,16,-500,42.42,something".indexOf(value) !== -1) {
   // blah
}
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var value= -55;
switch(value){
    case 1: case 16: case -55: case 42.5: case 'something': 
        alert(value); break;        

}
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In an effort to make yet another way of doing it...

if (/^(1|16|-500|42.42|something)$/.test(value)) {
  // blah blah blah
}

No need to extend array prototypes or anything, just use a quick regexp to test the value!

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