Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have used AtomicLong many times but I have never needed to use AtomicReference

It seems that AtomicReference does either (I copied this code from another stackoverflow question):

public synchronized boolean compareAndSet(List<Object> oldValue, List<Object> newValue) { 
    if (this.someList == oldValue) {
        // someList could be changed by another thread after that compare,
        // and before this set
        this.someList = newValue;
        return true;
    }
    return false;
}

Or

public synchronized boolean compareAndSet(List<Object> oldValue, List<Object> newValue) { 
    if (this.someList == oldValue || this.someList.equals(oldValue)) {
        // someList could be changed by another thread after that compare,
        // and before this set
        this.someList = newValue;
        return true;
    }
    return false;
}

Assume this.someList is marked volatile.

I'm not sure really which one it is because the javadoc and the code for that class are not clear if .equals is used.

Seeing how the above methods are not exactly that hard to write has anyone ever used AtomicReference?

share|improve this question
6  
They have ever used it. –  BalusC May 28 '10 at 21:06
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 8 down vote accepted

It's a reference, so that's what is compared. The documentation makes it very clear that it's an identity comparison, even using the == operation in its description.

I use AtomicReference and other atomic classes very frequently. Profiling shows that they perform better than the equivalent methods using synchronization. For example, a get() operation on an AtomicReference requires only a fetch from main memory, while an a similar operation using synchronized must first flush any values cached by threads to main memory and then perform its fetch.

The AtomicXXX classes provide access to native support for compare-and-swap (CAS) operations. If the underlying system supports it, CAS will be faster than any scheme cooked up with synchronized blocks in pure Java.

share|improve this answer
1  
Of course I am a moron. Its java.lang.ref I was thinking it was something like AtomicObject if there was one. –  Adam Gent May 28 '10 at 21:16
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.