Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm working on scientific code that is very performance-critical. An initial version of the code has been written and tested, and now, with profiler in hand, it's time to start shaving cycles from the hot spots.

It's well-known that some optimizations, e.g. loop unrolling, are handled these days much more effectively by the compiler than by a programmer meddling by hand. Which techniques are still worthwhile? Obviously, I'll run everything I try through a profiler, but if there's conventional wisdom as to what tends to work and what doesn't, it would save me significant time.

I know that optimization is very compiler- and architecture- dependent. I'm using Intel's C++ compiler targeting the Core 2 Duo, but I'm also interested in what works well for gcc, or for "any modern compiler."

Here are some concrete ideas I'm considering:

  • Is there any benefit to replacing STL containers/algorithms with hand-rolled ones? In particular, my program includes a very large priority queue (currently a std::priority_queue) whose manipulation is taking a lot of total time. Is this something worth looking into, or is the STL implementation already likely the fastest possible?
  • Along similar lines, for std::vectors whose needed sizes are unknown but have a reasonably small upper bound, is it profitable to replace them with statically-allocated arrays?
  • I've found that dynamic memory allocation is often a severe bottleneck, and that eliminating it can lead to significant speedups. As a consequence I'm interesting in the performance tradeoffs of returning large temporary data structures by value vs. returning by pointer vs. passing the result in by reference. Is there a way to reliably determine whether or not the compiler will use RVO for a given method (assuming the caller doesn't need to modify the result, of course)?
  • How cache-aware do compilers tend to be? For example, is it worth looking into reordering nested loops?
  • Given the scientific nature of the program, floating-point numbers are used everywhere. A significant bottleneck in my code used to be conversions from floating point to integers: the compiler would emit code to save the current rounding mode, change it, perform the conversion, then restore the old rounding mode --- even though nothing in the program ever changed the rounding mode! Disabling this behavior significantly sped up my code. Are there any similar floating-point-related gotchas I should be aware of?
  • One consequence of C++ being compiled and linked separately is that the compiler is unable to do what would seem to be very simple optimizations, such as move method calls like strlen() out of the termination conditions of loop. Are there any optimization like this one that I should look out for because they can't be done by the compiler and must be done by hand?
  • On the flip side, are there any techniques I should avoid because they are likely to interfere with the compiler's ability to automatically optimize code?

Lastly, to nip certain kinds of answers in the bud:

  • I understand that optimization has a cost in terms of complexity, reliability, and maintainability. For this particular application, increased performance is worth these costs.
  • I understand that the best optimizations are often to improve the high-level algorithms, and this has already been done.
share|improve this question
7  
What is your question? –  anon May 28 '10 at 21:06
    
+1 for @Neil. Then, profile your application, figure out where the bottlenecks are, and optimize those parts. –  Carl Norum May 28 '10 at 21:08
    
@Carl Of course. This is what I've done, and am doing –  user168715 May 28 '10 at 21:10
13  
The question is there if you read it. " Which techniques are still worthwhile? " –  kenny May 28 '10 at 21:23
7  
@ChrisW: Or you could consider it one large question with a lot of clarifications, or something in between. The OP obviously is interested in one topic (how to micro-optimize C++ programs on a modern compiler), even if the question is not in canonical form. –  David Thornley May 28 '10 at 21:41

19 Answers 19

Is there any benefit to replacing STL containers/algorithms with hand-rolled ones? In particular, my program includes a very large priority queue (currently a std::priority_queue) whose manipulation is taking a lot of total time. Is this something worth looking into, or is the STL implementation already likely the fastest possible?

I assume you're aware that the STL containers rely on copying the elements. In certain cases, this can be a significant loss. Store pointers and you may see an increase in performance if you do a lot of container manipulation. OTOH, it may reduce cache locality and hurt you. Another option is to use specialized allocators.

Certain containers (e.g. map, set, list) rely on lots of pointer manipulation. Although counterintuitive, it can often lead to faster code to replace them with vector. The resulting algorithm might go from O(1) or O(log n) to O(n), but due to cache locality it can be much faster in practice. Profile to be sure.

You mentioned you're using priority_queue, which I would imagine pays a lot for rearranging the elements, especially if they're large. You can try switching the underlying container (maybe deque or specialized). I'd almost certainly store pointers - again, profile to be sure.

Along similar lines, for a std::vectors whose needed sizes are unknown but have a reasonably small upper bound, is it profitable to replace them with statically-allocated arrays?

Again, this may help a small amount, depending on the use case. You can avoid the heap allocation, but only if you don't need your array to outlive the stack... or you could reserve() the size in the vector so there is less copying on reallocation.

I've found that dynamic memory allocation is often a severe bottleneck, and that eliminating it can lead to significant speedups. As a consequence I'm interesting in the performance tradeoffs of returning large temporary data structures by value vs. returning by pointer vs. passing the result in by reference. Is there a way to reliably determine whether or not the compiler will use RVO for a given method (assuming the caller doesn't need to modify the result, of course)?

You could look at the generated assembly to see if RVO is applied, but if you return pointer or reference, you can be sure there's no copy. Whether this will help is dependent on what you're doing - e.g. can't return references to temporaries. You can use arenas to allocate and reuse objects, so not to pay a large heap penalty.

How cache-aware do compilers tend to be? For example, is it worth looking into reordering nested loops?

I've seen dramatic (seriously dramatic) speedups in this realm. I saw more improvements from this than I later saw from multithreading my code. Things may have changed in the five years since - only one way to be sure - profile.

On the flip side, are there any techniques I should avoid because they are likely to interfere with the compiler's ability to automatically optimize code?

  • Use explicit on your single argument constructors. Temporary object construction and destruction may be hidden in your code.

  • Be aware of hidden copy constructor calls on large objects. In some cases, consider replacing with pointers.

  • Profile, profile, profile. Tune areas that are bottlenecks.

share|improve this answer
    
I'd really like to understand why this was downvoted. What did someone disagree with? –  Stephen May 28 '10 at 23:15
    
No idea... you bring up a lot of very helpful points, particularly your comments about the speedups you got from looking at data cache coherence -- something I'll examine in detail in my own code. –  user168715 May 29 '10 at 6:50

Take a look at the excellent Pitfalls of Object-Oriented Programming slides for some info about restructuring code for locality. In my experience getting better locality is almost always the biggest win.

General process:

  • Learn to love the Disassembly View in your debugger, or have your build system generate the intermediate assembly files (.s) if at all possible. Keep an eye on changes or for things that look egregious -- even without familiarity with a given instruction set architecture, you should be able to see some things fairly clearly! (I sometimes check in a series of .s files with corresponding .cpp/.c changes, just to leverage the lovely tools from my SCM to watch the code and corresponding asm change over time.)
  • Get a profiler that can watch your CPU's performance counters, or can at least guess at cache misses. (AMD CodeAnalyst, cachegrind, vTune, etc.)

Some other specific things:

  • Understand strict aliasing. Once you do, make use of restrict if your compiler has it. (Examine the disasm here too!)
  • Check out different floating point modes on your processor and compiler. If you don't need the denormalized range, choosing a mode without this can result in better performance. (It sounds like you've already done some things in this area, based on your discussion of rounding modes.)
  • Definitely avoid allocs: call reserve on std::vector when you can, or use std::array when you know the size at compile-time.
  • Use memory pools to increase locality and decrease alloc/free overhead; also to ensure cacheline alignment and prevent ping-ponging.
  • Use frame allocators if you're allocating things in predictable patterns, and can afford to deallocate everything in one go.
  • Do be aware of invariants. Something you know is invariant may not be to the compiler, for example a use of a struct or class member in a loop. I find the single easiest way to fall into the correct habit here is to give a name to everything, and prefer to name things outside of loops. E.g. const int threshold = m_currentThreshold; or perhaps Thing * const pThing = pStructHoldingThing->pThing; Fortunately you can usually see things that need this treatment in the disassembly view. This also helps with debugging later (makes the watch/locals window behave much more nicely in debug builds)!
  • Avoid writes in loops if possible -- accumulate first, then write, or batch a few writes together. YMMV, of course.

WRT your std::priority_queue question: inserting things into a vector (the default backend for a priority_queue) tends to move a lot of elements around. If you can break up into phases, where you insert data, then sort it, then read it once it's sorted, you'll probably be a lot better off. Although you'll definitely lose locality, you may find a more self-ordering structure like a std::map or std::set worth the overhead -- but this is really dependent on your usage patterns.

share|improve this answer
    
Very detailed. You should mention using a deque as the base of the priority queue. It behaves better than vector for reallocation yet has much of the vector behavior otherwise. –  Matthieu M. May 29 '10 at 15:01
1  
@Matthieu: I admit some prejudice against deque; I often work on hardware that has slow modulus. The iterators are heavy compared to vector. While deque has constant time insertion/removal of elements at the beginning of the sequence (in addition to end as with vector), implementations I've seen do poorly (worse than vector) at the middle. It might be worth it if you often insert elements that sort to the front. pop seems to map to pop_front; deque probably improves consumption. Should probably profile for the specific case! –  leander May 30 '10 at 19:03

Is there any benefit to replacing STL containers/algorithms with hand-rolled ones?
I would only consider this as a last option. The STL containers and algorithms have been thoroughly tested. Creating new ones are expensive in terms of development time.

Along similar lines, for std::vectors whose needed sizes are unknown but have a reasonably small upper bound, is it profitable to replace them with statically-allocated arrays?
First, try reserving space for the vectors. Check out the std::vector::reserve method. A vector that keeps growing or changing to larger sizes is going to waste dynamic memory and execution time. Add some code to determine a good value for an upper bound.

I've found that dynamic memory allocation is often a severe bottleneck, and that eliminating it can lead to significant speedups. As a consequence I'm interesting in the performance tradeoffs of returning large temporary data structures by value vs. returning by pointer vs. passing the result in by reference. Is there a way to reliably determine whether or not the compiler will use RVO for a given method (assuming the caller doesn't need to modify the result, of course)?
As a matter of principle, always pass large structures by reference or pointer. Prefer passing by constant reference. If you are using pointers, consider using smart pointers.

How cache-aware do compilers tend to be? For example, is it worth looking into reordering nested loops?
Modern compilers are very aware of instruction caches (pipelines) and try to keep them from being reloaded. You can always assist your compiler by writing code that uses less branches (from if, switch, loop constructs and function calls).

You may see more significant performance gain by adjusting your program to optimize the data cache. Search the web for Data Driven Design. There are many excellent articles on this topic.

Given the scientific nature of the program, floating-point numbers are used everywhere. A significant bottleneck in my code used to be conversions from floating point to integers: the compiler would emit code to save the current rounding mode, change it, perform the conversion, then restore the old rounding mode --- even though nothing in the program ever changed the rounding mode! Disabling this behavior significantly sped up my code. Are there any similar floating-point-related gotchas I should be aware of?
For accuracy, keep everything as a double. Adjust for rounding only when necessary and perhaps before displaying. This falls under the optimization rule, Use less code, eliminate extraneous or deadwood code.

Also see the section above about reserving space in containers before using them.

Some processors can load and store floating point numbers either faster or as fast as integers. This would require gathering profile data before optimizing. However, if you know there is minimal resolution, you could use integers and change your base to that minimal resolution . For example, when dealing with U.S. money, integers can be used to represent 1/100 or 1/1000 of a dollar.

One consequence of C++ being compiled and linked separately is that the compiler is unable to do what would seem to be very simple optimizations, such as move method calls like strlen() out of the termination conditions of loop. Are there any optimization like this one that I should look out for because they can't be done by the compiler and must be done by hand?
This an incorrect assumption. Compilers can optimize based on the function's signature, especially if the parameters correctly use const. I always like to assist the compiler by moving constant stuff outside of the loop. For an upper limit value, such as a string length, assign it to a const variable before the loop. The const modifier will assist the Optimizer.

There is always the count-down optimization in loops. For many processors, a jump on register equals zero is more efficient than compare and jump if less than.

On the flip side, are there any techniques I should avoid because they are likely to interfere with the compiler's ability to automatically optimize code?
I would avoid "micro optimizations". If you have any doubts, print out the assembly code generated by the compiler (for the area you are questioning) under the highest optimization setting. Try rewriting the code to express the compiler's assembly code. Optimize this code, if you can. Anything more requires platform specific instructions.

Optimization Ideas & Concepts

1. Computers prefer to execute sequential instructions.
Branching upsets them. Some modern processors have enough instruction cache to contain code for small loops. When in doubt, don't cause branches.

2. Eliminate Requirements
Less code, more performance.

3. Optimize designs before code Often times, more performance can be gained by changing the design versus changing the implementation of the design. Less design promotes less code, generates more performance.

4. Consider data organization Optimize the data.
Organize frequently used fields into substructures. Set data sizes to fit into a data cache line. Remove constant data out of data structures.
Use const specifier as much as possible.

5. Consider page swapping Operating systems will swap out your program or task for another one. Often times into a 'swap file' on the hard drive. Breaking up the code into chunks that contain heavily executed code and less executed code will assist the OS. Also, coagulate heavily used code into tighter units. The idea is to reduce the swapping of code from the hard drive (such as fetching "far" functions). If code must be swapped out, it should be as one unit.

6. Consider I/O optimizations (Includes file I/O too).
Most I/O prefers fewer large chunks of data to many small chunks of data. Hard drives like to keep spinning. Larger data packets have less overhead than smaller packets.
Format data into a buffer then write the buffer.

7. Eliminate the competition
Get rid of any programs and tasks that are competing against your application for the processor(s). Such tasks as virus scanning and playing music. Even I/O drivers want a piece of the action (which is why you want to reduce the number or I/O transactions).

These should keep you busy for a while. :-)

share|improve this answer
  1. Use of memory buffer pools can be of great performance benefit vs. dynamic allocation. More so if they reduce or prevent heap fragmentation over long execution runs.

  2. Be aware of data location. If you have a significant mix of local vs. global data you may be overworking the cache mechanism. Try to keep data sets in close proximity to make maximum use of cache line validity.

  3. Even though compilers do a wonderful job with loops, I still scrutinize them when performance tuning. You can spot architectural flaws that yield orders of magnitude where the compiler may only trim percentages.

  4. If a single priority queue is using a lot of time in its operation, there may be benefit to creating a battery of queues representing buckets of priority. It would be complexity being traded for speed in this case.

  5. I notice you didn't mention the use of SSE type instructions. Could they be applicable to your type of number crunching?

Best of luck.

share|improve this answer

Here is a nice paper on the subject.

share|improve this answer

About STL containers.

Most people here claim STL offers one of the fastest possible implementations of the container algorithms. And I say the opposite: for the most real-world scenarios the STL containers taken as-is yield a really catastrophic performance.

People argue about the complexity of the algorithms used in STL. Here STL is good: O(1) for list/queue, vector (amortized), and O(log(N)) for map. But this is not the real bottleneck of the performance for a typical application! For many applications the real bottleneck is the heap operations (malloc/free, new/delete, etc.).

A typical operation on the list costs just a few CPU cycles. On a map - some tens, may be more (this depends on the cache state and log(N) of course). And typical heap operations cost from hunders to thousands (!!!) of CPU cycles. For multithreaded applications for instance they also require synchronization (interlocked operations). Plus on some OSs (such as Windows XP) the heap functions are implemented entirely in the kernel mode.

So that the actual performance of the STL containers in a typical scenario is dominated by the amount of heap operations they perform. And here they're disastrous. Not because they're implemented poorly, but because of their design. That is, this is the question of the design.

On the other hand there're other containers which are designed differently. Once I've designed and written such containers for my own needs:

http://www.codeproject.com/KB/recipes/Containers.aspx

And it proved for me to be superior from the performance point of view, and not only.

But recently I've discovered I'm not the only one who thought about this. boost::intrusive is the container library that is implemented in the manner similar to what I did then.

I suggest you try it (if you didn't already)

share|improve this answer

Is there any benefit to replacing STL containers/algorithms with hand-rolled ones?

Generally, not unless you're working with a poor implementation. I wouldn't replace an STL container or algorithm just because you think you can write tighter code. I'd do it only if the STL version is more general than it needs to be for your problem. If you can write a simpler version that does just what you need, then there might be some speed to gain there.

One exception I've seen is to replace a copy-on-write std::string with one that doesn't require thread synchronization.

for std::vectors whose needed sizes are unknown but have a reasonably small upper bound, is it profitable to replace them with statically-allocated arrays?

Unlikely. But if you're using a lot of time allocating up to a certain size, it might be profitable to add a reserve() call.

performance tradeoffs of returning large temporary data structures by value vs. returning by pointer vs. passing the result in by reference.

When working with containers, I pass iterators for the inputs and an output iterator, which is still pretty general.

How cache-aware do compilers tend to be? For example, is it worth looking into reordering nested loops?

Not very. Yes. I find that missed branch predictions and cache-hostile memory access patterns are the two biggest killers of performance (once you've gotten to reasonable algorithms). A lot of older code uses "early out" tests to reduce calculations. But on modern processors, that's often more expensive than doing the math and ignoring the result.

A significant bottleneck in my code used to be conversions from floating point to integers

Yup. I recently discovered the same issue.

One consequence of C++ being compiled and linked separately is that the compiler is unable to do what would seem to be very simple optimizations, such as move method calls like strlen() out of the termination conditions of loop.

Some compilers can deal with this. Visual C++ has a "link-time code generation" option that effective re-invokes the compiler to do further optimization. And, in the case of functions like strlen, many compilers will recognize that as an intrinsic function.

Are there any optimization like this one that I should look out for because they can't be done by the compiler and must be done by hand? On the flip side, are there any techniques I should avoid because they are likely to interfere with the compiler's ability to automatically optimize code?

When you're optimizing at this low level, there are few reliable rules of thumb. Compilers will vary. Measure your current solution, and decide if it's too slow. If it is, come up with a hypothesis (e.g., "What if I replace the inner if-statements with a look-up table?"). It might help ("eliminates stalls due to failed branch predictions") or it might hurt ("look-up access pattern hurts cache coherence"). Experiment and measure incrementally.

I'll often clone the straightforward implementation and use an #ifdef HAND_OPTIMIZED/#else/#endif to switch between the reference version and the tweaked version. It's useful for later code maintenance and validation. I commit each successful experiment to change control, and keep a log (spreadsheet) with the changelist number, run times, and explanation for each step in optimization. As I learn more about how the code behaves, the log makes it easy to back up and branch off in another direction.

You need a framework for running reproducible timing tests and to compare results to the reference version to make sure you don't inadvertently introduce bugs.

share|improve this answer

If I were working on this, I would expect an end-stage where things like cache locality and vector operations would come into play.

However, before getting to the end stage, I would expect to find a series of problems of different sizes having less to do with compiler-level optimization, and more to do with odd stuff going on that could never be guessed, but once found, are simple to fix. Usually they revolve around class overdesign and data structure issues.

Here's an example of this kind of process.

I have found that generalized container classes with iterators, which in principle the compiler can optimize down to minimal cycles, often are not so optimized for some obscure reason. I've also heard other cases on SO where this happens.

Others have said, before you do anything else, profile. I agree with that approach except I think there's a better way, and it's indicated in that link. Whenever I find myself asking if some specific thing, like STL, could be a problem, I just might be right - BUT - I'm guessing. The fundamental winning idea in performance tuning is find out, don't guess. It is easy to find out for sure what is taking the time, so don't guess.

share|improve this answer

here is some stuff I had used:

  • templates to specialize innermost loops bounds (makes them really fast)
  • use __restrict__ keywords for alias problems
  • reserve vectors beforehand to sane defaults.
  • avoid using map (it can be really slow)
  • vector append/ insert can be significantly slow. If that is the case, raw operations may make it faster
  • N-byte memory alignment (Intel has pragma aligned, http://www.intel.com/software/products/compilers/docs/clin/main_cls/cref_cls/common/cppref_pragma_vector.htm)
  • trying to keep memory within L1/L2 caches.
  • compiled with NDEBUG
  • profile using oprofile, use opannotate to look for specific lines (stl overhead is clearly visible then)

here are sample parts of profile data (so you know where to look for problems)

 * Output annotated source file with samples
 * Output all files
 *
 * CPU: Core 2, speed 1995 MHz (estimated)
--
 * Total samples for file : "/home/andrey/gamess/source/blas.f"
 *
 * 1020586 14.0896
--
 * Total samples for file : "/home/andrey/libqc/rysq/src/fock.cpp"
 *
 * 962558 13.2885
--
 * Total samples for file : "/usr/include/boost/numeric/ublas/detail/matrix_assign.hpp"
 *
 * 748150 10.3285

--
 * Total samples for file : "/usr/include/boost/numeric/ublas/functional.hpp"
 *
 * 639714  8.8315
--
 * Total samples for file : "/home/andrey/gamess/source/eigen.f"
 *
 * 429129  5.9243
--
 * Total samples for file : "/usr/include/c++/4.3/bits/stl_algobase.h"
 *
 * 411725  5.6840
--

example of code from my project

template<int ni, int nj, int nk, int nl>
inline void eval(const Data::density_type &D, const Data::fock_type &F,
                 const double *__restrict Q, double scale) {

    const double * __restrict Dij = D[0];
    ...
    double * __restrict Fij = F[0];
    ...

    for (int l = 0, kl = 0, ijkl = 0; l < nl; ++l) {
        for (int k = 0; k < nk; ++k, ++kl) {
            for (int j = 0, ij = 0; j < nj; ++j, ++jk, ++jl) {
                for (int i = 0; i < ni; ++i, ++ij, ++ik, ++il, ++ijkl) {
share|improve this answer
    
Your point about std::map is interesting. Are there better standard-library alternatives (hash_map, if available?) or do you recommend rolling your own? –  user168715 May 28 '10 at 21:35
    
@user well, in my case key was pair of integers and size was known ahead of time. so replaced map with 2d array of pointers and kept actual values in static array. in my case, that improved performance by roughly 20 percent. I cannot really recommend either, since it do not know your problem domain. –  Anycorn May 28 '10 at 21:39
    
hash_map vs map depends on the number of keys. If you have a very large number of keys, then a hash is a better idea, but if it's just a few, then a map would offer better performance. Also, I believe that a hash_map may offer better cache coherence, so as normal profile. Just for reference, both VS and GCC offer a hash_map extension, and I think that VS's is drag/drop replacement with std::map. –  Puppy May 28 '10 at 21:57
1  
Can you clarify what you mean by "templates to specialize innermost loop bounds"? –  Drew Hall May 29 '10 at 1:42
    
@Drew i put code snippet to explain –  Anycorn May 29 '10 at 5:15

And I think the main hint anyone could give you is: measure, measure, measure. That and improving your algorithms.
The way you use certain language features, the compiler version, std lib implementation, platform, machine - all ply their role in performance and you haven't mentioned many of those and no one of us ever had your exact setup.

Regarding replacing std::vector: use a drop-in replacement (e.g., this one) and just try it out.

share|improve this answer

How cache-aware do compilers tend to be? For example, is it worth looking into reordering nested loops?

I can't speak for all compilers, but my experience with GCC shows that it will not heavily optimize code with respect to the cache. I would expect this to be true for most modern compilers. Optimization such as reordering nested loops can definitely affect performance. If you believe that you have memory access patterns that could lead to many cache misses, it will be in your interest to investigate this.

share|improve this answer

Is there any benefit to replacing STL containers/algorithms with hand-rolled ones? In particular, my program includes a very large priority queue (currently a std::priority_queue) whose manipulation is taking a lot of total time. Is this something worth looking into, or is the STL implementation already likely the fastest possible?

The STL is generally the fastest, general case. If you have a very specific case, you might see a speed-up with a hand-rolled one. For example, std::sort (normally quicksort) is the fastest general sort, but if you know in advance that your elements are virtually already ordered, then insertion sort might be a better choice.

Along similar lines, for std::vectors whose needed sizes are unknown but have a reasonably small upper bound, is it profitable to replace them with statically-allocated arrays?

This depends on where you are going to do the static allocation. One thing I tried along this line was to static allocate a large amount of memory on the stack, then re-use later. Results? Heap memory was substantially faster. Just because an item is on the stack doesn't make it faster to access- the speed of stack memory also depends on things like cache. A statically allocated global array may not be any faster than the heap. I assume that you have already tried techniques like just reserving the upper bound. If you have a lot of vectors that have the same upper bound, consider improving cache by having a vector of structs, which contain the data members.

I've found that dynamic memory allocation is often a severe bottleneck, and that eliminating it can lead to significant speedups. As a consequence I'm interesting in the performance tradeoffs of returning large temporary data structures by value vs. returning by pointer vs. passing the result in by reference. Is there a way to reliably determine whether or not the compiler will use RVO for a given method (assuming the caller doesn't need to modify the result, of course)?

I personally normally pass the result in by reference in this scenario. It allows for a lot more re-use. Passing large data structures by value and hoping that the compiler uses RVO is not a good idea when you can just manually use RVO yourself.

How cache-aware do compilers tend to be? For example, is it worth looking into reordering nested loops?

I found that they weren't particularly cache-aware. The issue is that the compiler doesn't understand your program and can't predict the vast majority of it's state, especially if you depend heavily on heap. If you have a profiler that ships with your compiler, for example Visual Studio's Profile Guided Optimization, then this can produce excellent speedups.

Given the scientific nature of the program, floating-point numbers are used everywhere. A significant bottleneck in my code used to be conversions from floating point to integers: the compiler would emit code to save the current rounding mode, change it, perform the conversion, then restore the old rounding mode --- even though nothing in the program ever changed the rounding mode! Disabling this behavior significantly sped up my code. Are there any similar floating-point-related gotchas I should be aware of?

There are different floating-point models - Visual Studio gives an fp:fast compiler setting. As for the exact effects of doing such, I can't be certain. However, you could try altering the floating point precision or other settings in your compiler and checking the result.

One consequence of C++ being compiled and linked separately is that the compiler is unable to do what would seem to be very simple optimizations, such as move method calls like strlen() out of the termination conditions of loop. Are there any optimization like this one that I should look out for because they can't be done by the compiler and must be done by hand?

I've never come across such a scenario. However, if you're genuinely concerned about such, then the option remains to do it manually. One of the things that you could try is calling a function on a const reference, suggesting to the compiler that the value won't change.

One of the other things that I want to point out is the use of non-standard extensions to the compiler, for example provided by Visual Studio is __assume. http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/1b3fsfxw(VS.80).aspx

There's also multithread, which I would expect you've gone down that road. You could try some specific opts, like another answer suggested SSE.

Edit: I realized that a lot of the suggestions I posted referenced Visual Studio directly. That's true, but, GCC almost certainly provides alternatives to the majority of them. I just have personal experience with VS most.

share|improve this answer

The STL priority queue implementation is fairly well-optimized for what it does, but certain kinds of heaps have special properties that can improve your performance on certain algorithms. Fibonacci heaps are one example. Also, if you're storing objects with a small key and a large amount of satellite data, you'll get a major improvement in cache performance if you store that data separately, even if it means storing one extra pointer per object.

As for arrays, I've found std::vector to even slightly out-perform compile-time-constant arrays. That said, its optimizations are general, and specific knowledge of your algorithm's access patterns may allow you to optimize further for cache locality, alignment, coloring, etc. If you find that your performance drops significantly past a certain threshold due to cache effects, hand-optimized arrays may move that problem size threshold by as much as a factor of two in some cases, but it's unlikely to make a huge difference for small inner loops that fit easily within the cache, or large working sets that exceed the size of any CPU cache. Work on the priority queue first.

Most of the overhead of dynamic memory allocation is constant with respect to the size of the object being allocated. Allocating one large object and returning it by a pointer isn't going to hurt much as much as copying it. The threshold for copying vs. dynamic allocation varies greatly between systems, but it should be fairly consistent within a chip generation.

Compilers are quite cache-aware when cpu-specific tuning is turned on, but they don't know the size of the cache. If you're optimizing for cache size, you may want to detect that or have the user specify it at run-time, since that will vary even between processors of the same generation.

As for floating point, you absolutely should be using SSE. This doesn't necessarily require learning SSE yourself, as there are many libraries of highly-optimized SSE code that do all sorts of important scientific computing operations. If you're compiling 64-bit code, the compiler might emit some SSE code automatically, as SSE2 is part of the x86_64 instruction set. SSE will also save you some of the overhead of x87 floating point, since it's not converting back and forth to 80-bit values internally. Those conversions can also be a source of accuracy problems, since you can get different results from the same set of operations depending on how they get compiled, so it's good to be rid of them.

share|improve this answer

If you work on big matrices for instance, consider tiling your loops to improve the locality. This often leads to dramatic improvements. You can use VTune/PTU to monitor the L2 cache misses.

share|improve this answer

One consequence of C++ being compiled and linked separately is that the compiler is unable to do what would seem to be very simple optimizations, such as move method calls like strlen() out of the termination conditions of loop. Are there any optimization like this one that I should look out for because they can't be done by the compiler and must be done by hand?

On some compilers this is incorrect. The compiler has perfect knowledge of all code across all translation units (including static libraries) and can optimize the code the same way it would do if it were in a single translation unit. A few ones that support this feature come to my mind:

  • Microsoft Visual C++ compilers
  • Intel C++ Compiler
  • LLVC-GCC
  • GCC (I think, not sure)
share|improve this answer

i'm surprised no one has mentioned these two:

  • Link time optimization clang and g++ from 4.5 on support link time optimizations. I've heard that on g++ case, the heuristics is still pretty inmature but it should improve quickly since the main architecture is laid out.

    Benefits range from inter procedural optimizations at object file level, including highly sought stuff like inling of virtual calls (devirtualization)

  • Project inlining this might seem to some like very crude approach, but it is that very crudeness which makes it so powerful: this amounts at dumping all your headers and .cpp files into a single, really big .cpp file and compile that; basically it will give you the same benefits of link-time optimization in your trip back to 1999. Of course, if your project is really big, you'll still need a 2010 machine; this thing will eat your RAM like there is no tomorrow. However, even in that case, you can split it in more than one no-so-damn-huge .cpp file

share|improve this answer

If you are doing heavy floating point math you should consider using SSE to vectorize your computations if that maps well to your problem.

Google SSE intrinsics for more information about this.

share|improve this answer

Here is something that worked for me once. I can't say that it will work for you. I had code on the lines of

switch(num) {
   case 1: result = f1(param); break;
   case 2: result = f2(param); break;
   //...
}

Then I got a serious performance boost when I changed it to

// init:
funcs[N] = {f1, f2 /*...*/};
// later in the code:
result = (funcs[num])(param);

Perhaps someone here can explain the reason the latter version is better. I suppose it has something to do with the fact that there are no conditional branches there.

share|improve this answer
    
Single step it at the assembly language level. That will tell you if the compiler was able to turn the switch statement into a jump table or just a bunch of if statements. –  Mike Dunlavey May 29 '10 at 4:03

My current project is a media server, with multi thread processing (C++ language). It's a time critical application, once low performance functions could cause bad results on media streaming like lost of sync, high latency, huge delays and so.

The strategy i usually use to grantee the best performance possible is to minimize the amount of heavy operational system calls that allocate or manage resources like memory, files, sockets and so.

At first i wrote my own STL, network and file manage classes.

All my containers classes ("MySTL") manage their own memory blocks to avoid multiple alloc (new) / free (delete) calls. The objects released are enqueued on a memory block pool to be reused when needed. On that way i improve performance and protect my code against memory fragmentation.

The parts of the code that need to access lower performance system resources (like files, databases, script, network write) i use separate threads for them. But not one thread for each unit (like not 1 thread for each socket), if so the operational system would lose performance while managing a high number of threads. So you can group objects of same classes to be processed on a separate thread if possible.

For example, if you have to write data to a network socket, but the socket write buffer is full, i save the data on a sendqueue buffer (which shares memory with all sockets together) to be sent on a separate thread as soon as the sockets become writeable again. At this way your main threads should never stop processing on a blocked state waiting for the operational system frees a specific resource. All the buffers released are saved and reused when needed.

After all a profile tool would be welcome to look for program bottles and shows which algorithms should be improved.

i got succeeded using that strategy once i have servers running like 500+ days on a linux machine without rebooting, with thousands users logging everyday.

[02:01] -alpha.ip.tv- Uptime: 525days 12hrs 43mins 7secs

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.