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I have a couple of queries related to Cache-Control.

If I specify Cache-Control max-age=3600, must-revalidate for a static html/js/images/css file, with Last Modified Header defined in HTTP header:

  1. Does browser/proxy cache(like Squid/Akamai) go all the way to origin server to validate before max-age expires? Or will it serve content from cache till max-age expires?
  2. After max-age expiry (that is expiry from cache), is there a If-Modified-Since check or is content re-downloaded from origin server w/o If-Modified-Since check?
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2 Answers 2

a) If the server includes this header:

Cache-Control "max-age=3600, must-revalidate"

it is telling both client caches and proxy caches that once the content is stale (older than 3600 seconds) they must revalidate at the origin server before they can serve the content. This should be the default behavior of caching systems, but the must-revalidate directive makes this requirement unambiguous.

b) The client should revalidate. It might revalidate using the If-Match or If-None-Match headers with an ETag, or it might use the If-Modified-Since or If-Unmodified-Since headers with a date.

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5  
To me the protocol is a bit ambiguous here, but in practice I have found that must-revalidate means it must revalidate regardless of max-age. –  ColinM Mar 15 '12 at 0:44
2  
@ColinM, What do you mean? must-revalidate means it must revalidate only when max-age is reached no? –  Pacerier Aug 25 '13 at 7:20
    
Behavior seems to vary across browsers. I believe Firefox uses ColinM's interpretation, but in some recent work I'm finding that others (e.g. Chrome) apparently do not. –  Joe Mabel Oct 21 '13 at 19:09
3  
I'm calling "citation needed" on this answer. There seems to be some debate on whether it's accurate. –  andrewrk Nov 24 '13 at 2:31
4  
According to RFC2616[1], "When the must-revalidate directive is present in a response received by a cache, that cache MUST NOT use the entry after it becomes stale to respond to a subsequent request without first revalidating it with the origin server" This means that the official spec agrees with the answer, and not with @ColinM. w3.org/Protocols/rfc2616/rfc2616-sec14.html#sec14.9.4 –  andrewrk Nov 24 '13 at 2:40

a. Look at the ‘Stats’ tab on this page and see what happens.

b. After expiration the browser will check at the server if the file is updated. If not, the server will respond with a 304 Not Modified header and nothing is downloaded.

You can check this behaviour yourself by looking at the ‘Net’ panel in Firebug or similar tools. Just re-enter the URL in the address bar and compare the number of HTTP requests with the number of requests when your cache is empty.

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