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I am a college student getting my Computer Science degree. A lot of my fellow students really haven't done a lot of programming. They've done their class assignments, but let's be honest here those questions don't really teach you how to program.

I have had several other students ask me questions about how to parse things, and I'm never quite sure how to explain it to them. Is it best to start just going line by line looking for substrings, or just give them the more complicated lecture about using proper lexical analysis, etc. to create tokens, use BNF, and all of that other stuff? They never quite understand it when I try to explain it.

What's the best approach to explain this without confusing them or discouraging them from actually trying.

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2  
One of the best books I ever purchased was "Writing Compilers and Interpreters" (by Ronald Mak). I've never actually written a full-blown compiler, but it was a great example of breaking down a complex problem into manageable pieces. A bit over-kill for most, though. –  Daniel Pratt May 29 '10 at 0:00
    
@Daniel Pratt - +1. That was/is a great book, I learned a ton of stuff by working my way through it. –  user113476 May 29 '10 at 2:04
    
Parsing is the sintatic analysis part of the compilation process. It only determines if a specified input is valid or not. Is your question about it? Or about the more broad subject of language interpretation? –  Carlos Loth May 29 '10 at 2:07

6 Answers 6

up vote 10 down vote accepted

I'd explain parsing as the process of turning some kind of data into another kind of data.

In practice, for me this is almost always turning a string, or binary data, into a data structure inside my Program.

For example, turning

":Nick!User@Host PRIVMSG #channel :Hello!"

into (C)

struct irc_line {
    char *nick;
    char *user;
    char *host;
    char *command;
    char **arguments;
    char *message;
} sample = { "Nick", "User", "Host", "PRIVMSG", { "#channel" }, "Hello!" }
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+1 Interesting way of explaining a complicated term –  David Relihan May 29 '10 at 0:34
    
-1 You explained what a compilation process is. Parsing is a concept simpler than turning some kind of data into another. –  Carlos Loth May 29 '10 at 4:23
    
-1 Carlos is correct. Parsing is not turning data into anything else. Parsing is just the analysis of a sequence of characters (or tokens). Creating something from the analysis is a complete different thing. –  jpbochi May 31 '10 at 13:30
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On some existential level, every program is about turning one kind of data into another kind of data (isn't that the definition of a function?). I think a clearer way of expressing it would be to say that parsing is the process of assigning names to bits of input. In your example, you are assigning the name sample.message to the characters "Hello!". This is a necessary prerequisite to, but completely separate from, the task of assigning meaning to names -- e.g., what does sample.message mean, or what does it do? As Carlos points out, that becomes semantic analysis. –  Daniel Pryden Jun 9 '10 at 1:21

Parsing is the process of analyzing text made of a sequence of tokens to determine its grammatical structure with respect to a given (more or less) formal grammar.

The parser then builds a data structure based on the tokens. This data structure can then be used by a compiler, interpreter or translator to create an executable program or library.

alt text

If I gave you an english sentence, and asked you to break down the sentence into its parts of speech (nouns, verbs, etc.), you would be parsing the sentence.

That's the simplest explanation of parsing I can think of.

That said, parsing is a non-trivial computational problem. You have to start with simple examples, and work your way up to the more complex.

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+1 also, "To split a file or other input into bits of data that can be easily stored or manipulated. " - en.wiktionary.org/wiki/parse –  jball May 29 '10 at 0:01
    
In my LC-3 class, we had to write a program that would have the user input an instruction name (ADD, LD, JMP etc) and it would return the opcode. He called this an op-code parser. He never really explained what parsing even was. This kind of makes sense though! –  yuudachi May 29 '10 at 0:20
    
@Robert: -1 I think your definition is incorrect. Parse is the process of defining if an input belongs to a specified language, the formal name for it is sintatical analysis. –  Carlos Loth May 29 '10 at 2:02
    
@Carlos: Er...What? See my edit for the actual definition. –  Robert Harvey May 29 '10 at 2:04
    
@Robert: Your first sentence is still incorrect, the process of extract meaning of a text is semantic analysis, not parsing. –  Carlos Loth May 29 '10 at 2:25

What is parsing?

In computer science, parsing is the process of analysing text to determine if it belongs to a specific language or not (i.e. is syntactically valid for that language's grammar). It is an informal name for the syntactic analysis process.

For example, suppose the language a^n b^n (which means same number of characters A followed by the same number of characters B). A parser for that language would accept AABB input and reject the AAAB input. That is what a parser does.

In addition, during this process a data structure could be created for further processing. In my previous example, it could, for instance, to store the AA and BB in two separate stacks.

Anything that happens after it, like giving meaning to AA or BB, or transform it in something else, is not parsing. Giving meaning to parts of an input sequence of tokens is called semantic analysis.

What isn't parsing?

  • Parsing is not transform one thing into another. Transform A into B, is, in essence, what a compiler does. Compiling takes several steps, parsing is only one of them.
  • Parsing is not extract meaning from a text. Extract meaning from a text, is semantic analysis which is a step of the compiling process.

What is the simplest way to understand it?

I think the best way for understanding the parsing concept is to begin with the simpler concepts. The simplest one in language processing subject is the finite automaton. It is a formalism to parsing regular languages, such as regular expressions.

It is very simple, you have an input, a set of states and a set of transitions. Consider the following language built over the alphabet { A, B }, L = { w | w starts with 'AA' or 'BB' as substring }. The automaton below represents a possible parser for that language whose all valid words starts with 'AA' or 'BB'.

    A-->(q1)--A-->(qf)
   /  
 (q0)    
   \          
    B-->(q2)--B-->(qf)

It is a very simple parser for that language. You start at (q0), the initial state, then you read a symbol from the input, if it is A then you move to (q1) state, otherwise (it is a B, remember the remember the alphabet is only A and B) you move to (q2) state and so on. If you reach (qf) state, then the input was accepted.

As it is visual, you only need a pencil and a piece of paper to explain what a parser is to anyone, including a child. I think the simplicity is what makes the automata the most suitable way to teaching language processing concepts, such as parsing.

Finally, being a Computer Science student, you will study such concepts in-deep at theoretical computer science classes such as Formal Languages and Theory of Computation.

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Sorry, Carlos, but you got it wrong. Basically what you are saying is that parsing determines whether source code is C#, Visual Basic, or Java. That makes no sense, and it's not the purpose of parsing. –  Robert Harvey May 29 '10 at 3:02
    
I didn't say that. What I said is that a parsing is the process that determines if a program is sintatically valid (belongs to a language). –  Carlos Loth May 29 '10 at 3:12
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You could at least spell "syntactically" correctly. The Wikipedia article captures the essence of what parsing is pretty well. You should read it. –  Robert Harvey May 29 '10 at 3:17
    
Thanks for pointing it out, I'm not a native english speaker. But you already noted it. –  Carlos Loth May 29 '10 at 4:02
    
@Robert: I've already read the article again (after our exchange of ideas) and I continue with the same opinion. –  Carlos Loth May 29 '10 at 4:11

Have them try to write a program that can evaluate arbitrary simple arithmetic expressions. This is a simple problem to understand but as you start getting deeper into it a lot of basic parsing starts to make sense.

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Parsing is about READING data in one format so that you can use it to yours needs.

I think you need to teach them to think like this, so, this is the simplest way I can think of to explain parsing for someone new to this concept.

Generally, we try to parse data one line at a time because generally it is easier for humans to think this way, dividing and conquering, and also easier to code.

We call field to every minimun undivisible data. Name is field, Age is another field, and Surname is another field, for example.

In a line, we can have various fields. In order to distiguish them, we can delimite fields by separators or by the maximun length assign to each field.

For example: By separating fileds by comma

Paul,20,Jones

Or by space (Name can have 20 letters max, age up to 3 digits, Jones up to 20 letters)

Paul                020Jones               

Any of the before set of fields is called a record.

To separate between a delimited field record we need to delimit record. A dot will be enough (though you know you can apply CR/LF).

A list could be:

Michael,39,Jordan.Shaquille,40,O'neal.Lebron,24,James.

or with CR/LF

Michael,39,Jordan
Shaquille,40,O'neal
Lebron,24,James

You can say them to list 10 nba (or nlf) players they like. Then, they should type them according to a format. Then make a program to parse it and display each record. One group, can make list in a comma-separated format and a program to parse a list in a fixed size format, and viceversa.

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-1 Converting data from one format to another is compilation. –  Carlos Loth May 29 '10 at 2:51
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My answer is meant to be practical to beginners. To ease their learning. Later, they can tackle more aspects, like syntax analysis, parsing, grammars, etc... –  user347594 May 29 '10 at 4:56
    
Parsing is not about converting anything. Parsing is just reading. Misuse of concepts will lead to more confusion later. –  jpbochi May 31 '10 at 13:25

Parsing to me is breaking down something into meaningful parts... using a definable or predefined known, common set of part "definitions".

For programming languages there would be keyword parts, usable punctuation sequences...

For pumpkin pie it might be something like the crust, filling and toppings.

For written languages there might be what a word is, a sentence, what a verb is...

For spoken languages it might be tone, volume, mood, implication, emotion, context

Syntax analysis (as well as common sense after all) would tell if what your are parsing is a pumpkinpie or a programming language. Does it have crust? well maybe it's pumpkin pudding or perhaps a spoken language !

One thing to note about parsing stuff is there are usually many ways to break things into parts.

For example you could break up a pumpkin pie by cutting it from the center to the edge or from the bottom to the top or with a scoop to get the filling out or by using a sledge hammer or eating it.

And how you parse things would determine if doing something with those parts will be easy or hard.

In the "computer languages" world, there are common ways to parse text source code. These common methods (algorithims) have titles or names. Search the Internet for common methods/names for ways to parse languages. Wikipedia can help in this regard.

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