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I'm developing an interpreter and I have some questions to it.

I recently saw a small C interpreter that used a very simple struct like the below for all its objects/values in the language:

struct Object
{
    ubyte type;
    ubyte value;
};

This struct can hold strings, integers, bools and lists (I think) used in the language the interpreter is working with.

  • How can you get this Object struct to hold all these types?
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3  
are you sure that value is ubyte? –  Nick Dandoulakis May 29 '10 at 10:16

2 Answers 2

How can you get this Object struct to hold all these types?

It doesn't hold the value it just holds IDs/references to the values which are stored somewhere else.

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Most likely, it's done like sbi suggests, so the interpreter's struct would look more like:

struct Object
{
    ubyte type;
    void* value;
};

The actual value would be allocated somewhere on the heap, and when the object was constructed, the interpreter would note the type in ubyte type. Later, functions would note the type using object.type and alias the value to that type, or just assume that it was the correct type, like this:

useObjectAsString(Object toUse) 
{
    char* data = (char*)toUse.value;
}

If you just have a few types you want to implement, you could also try using a union.

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